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Travel Advisory July 31, 2023

Ethiopia - level 3: reconsider travel.

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Reconsider travel to Ethiopia due to  sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, crime, communications disruptions, terrorism and kidnapping in border areas .

Do Not Travel To:

  • Tigray Region and border with Eritrea due to  sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and crime .
  • Afar-Tigray   border areas  due  to sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and crime .
  • Amhara Region due to  sporadic violent conflict and civil unrest .
  • Gambella and Benishangul Gumuz Regions due to  crime, kidnapping, ethnically motivated violence, and sporadic violent conflict
  • Oromia Region – Specific areas due to sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and ethnically motivated violence.
  • Southern Nations and National People (SNNP) Region due to  sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and ethnically motivated violence.
  • Border area with Somalia due to  terrorism, kidnapping, and landmines .
  • Border areas with Sudan, and South Sudan due to  crime, kidnapping, civil unrest, and sporadic violent conflict.
  • Border areas with Kenya due to the potential for  terrorism and ethnically motivated violence.

The security situation in Addis Ababa is stable. However, there is sporadic violent conflict and civil unrest in other areas of Ethiopia, and the security situation may deteriorate without warning. The U.S. Embassy is unlikely to be able to assist with departure from the country if the security situation deteriorates. Due to sporadic violent conflict and civil unrest throughout parts of Ethiopia, travel by U.S. government personnel is routinely assessed for additional restrictions. Please see information on  What the Department of State Can and Can't Do in a Crisis .

U.S. officials have limited ability to provide services to U.S. citizens outside of Addis Ababa and have very limited consular access to U.S. citizens detained by Ethiopian authorities. The government of Ethiopia has previously restricted or shut down internet, cellular data, and phone services before, during, and after civil unrest. These restrictions impede the U.S. Embassy’s ability to communicate with and provide consular services to U.S. citizens in Ethiopia.

Please contact the Embassy’s American Citizen Services Unit at  [email protected]  for further assistance.

Read the  country information page  for additional information about travel to Ethiopia.

If you decide to travel to Ethiopia:

  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by U.S. citizens/Westerners/foreign travelers.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report for Ethiopia .
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest  Travel Health Information  related to your travel.

Tigray Region and Border with Eritrea – Do Not Travel

Due to sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and crime, the Tigray Region and the border with Eritrea are restricted for travel by U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts. Border roads with Eritrea are closed and conditions at the border may change with no warning.

Afar-Tigray Border Area – Do Not Travel

Due to sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and crime, the Afar-Tigray border area is restricted for travel by U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Amhara Region – Do Not Travel 

Due to sporadic violent conflict and civil unrest, the Amhara Region is currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Gambella Region – Do Not Travel

Due to crime, kidnapping, the potential for ethnically motivated violence, and sporadic violent conflict, the Gambella Region is restricted for travel by U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Benishangul Gumuz Region – Do Not Travel

Due to crime, kidnapping, the potential for ethnically motivated violence and sporadic violent conflict, the Benishangul Gumuz Region   is restricted for travel by U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Oromia Region – Specific Areas – Do Not Travel

Due to sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and ethnically motivated violence, the following zones in Oromia are restricted for travel by U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts: the entirety of Horro-Guduru Wollega, East Wollega, West Wollega, Kelem Wollega, Illubabor, and Bale. Other areas in Oromia include portions of North, West, and Southwest Shewa to the immediate north and west of Addis Ababa; the Boset and Fentale woredas of East Shewa zone between Welenchiti and Awash; portions of the Borena zone surrounding Bule Hora; and portions of Guji zone to the east of Bule Hora.

Southern Nations and National People (SNNP) Region – Specific Areas – Do Not Travel

Due to sporadic violent conflict, civil unrest, and ethnically motivated violence the following towns and areas in SNNP are restricted for travel by U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts: Gedeo, Konso zones and the Amaro and Derashe special woredas.

Border Area with Somalia – Do Not Travel

Terrorists maintain a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting a risk of cross-border attacks and kidnappings. Landmines are present in this region. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas with Somalia, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Border Areas with Sudan and South Sudan – Do Not Travel

Crime, kidnapping, the potential for ethnically motivated violence, and sporadic violent conflict exist near the Ethiopian borders with Sudan and South Sudan. This includes but is not limited to the Nuer Zone and the Jore Woreda of the Agnuak Zone in the Gambela region, and the Pawe, Guba, Dangur, Dibati, and Bulen woredas, and the Metekel zone in the Benishangul Gumuz Region. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas of Sudan and South Sudan, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Border Areas with Kenya – Do Not Travel

Terrorists, particularly Al-Shabaab, maintain a presence in this area, and ethnically motivated violence has been reported. This includes but is not limited to the Borena zone and surrounding areas. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas with Kenya, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Visit our website for advice if you decide to  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Yes (www.evisa.gov.et)

Yellow fever certificate required if traveling from a country with risk of yellow fever transmission; recommended for all areas in Ethiopia except Afar and Somali regions.

1,000 ETB for all travelers; 1000 USD or other foreign currency equivalent if person resides in Ethiopia; 3,000 USD or other foreign currency equivalent if person is not residing in Ethiopia. Excess currency may be confiscated.

1,000 ETB (4,000 ETB if travelling to Djibouti) and 3,000 USD or other foreign currency equivalent.

Embassies and Consulates

U.s. embassy addis ababa.

Entoto Street PO Box 1014 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Telephone: +251-11-130-6000 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: 011-130-6000 Fax: +251-11-124-2435 and +251-11-124-2419 Email: [email protected]

Destination Description

Learn about the U.S. relationship to countries around the world.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Please visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page more information on entry/ exit requirements related to COVID-19 in Ethiopia. 

Requirements for Entry:

  • World Health Organization (WHO) card with yellow fever vaccination if coming from country with risk of yellow fever transmission ( countries with risk of YF transmission )

Visas:  All U.S. citizens are required to obtain a visa to legally enter Ethiopia.  Do not travel to Ethiopia unless you have an approved e-Visa. Travelers without a valid visa will be denied entry. To avoid any disruption to your travel print and carry a copy of your e-Visa with you.  Please, visit  https://www.evisa.gov.et/visa/apply  to apply for an e-Visa before traveling to Ethiopia.  Contact the  Embassy of Ethiopia  for the most current visa information. Overseas inquiries about visas should be made at the nearest Ethiopian embassy or consulate.

The Ethiopian Immigration and Citizenship Service strictly enforces immigration regulations and expects all foreign nationals to be in the country under legal status. There is a daily fine if you overstay your visa.  This fine must be paid in full in U.S. dollars at immigration in order to obtain an exit visa and be permitted to depart the country.

Foreign Currency Restrictions:

  • Visitors to Ethiopia, including transit passengers who do not plan to exit Bole International Airport, may hold up to a maximum of 1,000 ETB per trip to and from Ethiopia. Persons residing in Ethiopia can enter with 1,000 USD or other foreign currency equivalent. Persons not residing in Ethiopia can enter with 3,000 USD or other foreign currency equivalent. Travelers must declare all foreign currency exceeding the above limits.
  • Residents of Ethiopia may not hold foreign currency for more than 30 days after declaring it. Nonresidents may hold foreign currency for the duration of their visa.
  • When departing Ethiopia, nonresidents carrying more than the equivalent of 3,000 USD in foreign currency and residents carrying any amount of foreign currency must produce a valid bank document or foreign currency customs declaration that is less than 30 days old.
  • These regulations are strictly enforced, and failure to comply will likely result in the confiscation of excess or undeclared currency.

Ivory, Animal Skins, Souvenirs, Precious Stones and Minerals, Antiques/Artifacts:

  • Travelers transporting ivory may be detained, imprisoned, or fined and the ivory may be confiscated.
  • Souvenirs that are copies of antiques or religious artifacts require a proper receipt and may still be confiscated.
  • Export permits processed by the Export Section of the airport customs office are required for antiques, including religious artifacts, Ethiopian crosses, and animal skins and other wildlife parts. Contact the Ethiopian Wildlife Conservation Authority for a permit.
  • There are limits on the amount of precious stones and minerals that can be exported for personal use. Check with local authorities.
  • Contact the Ethiopian Ministry of Revenue s if you have any questions about exports.
  • See our Customs and Import Restrictions information sheet .

Electronics:

  • Laptop computers and video equipment intended for anything other than personal use must be declared upon arrival and departure.
  • Some recording devices may require special customs permits. If these items are being used for work, you should contact the Ethiopian Embassy  before you travel.
  • The U.S. Embassy cannot assist with obtaining permits or the return of confiscated equipment.

HIV/AIDS: The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Ethiopia. Please verify this with the Ethiopian Embassy before you travel.

Find information on  dual nationality ,  prevention of international child abduction  and  customs regulations  on our websites.

Safety and Security

Terrorism: Al-Qa’ida and its regional affiliate, Somalia-based al-Shabaab, maintain a presence throughout East Africa. In late 2020, Ethiopian security officials announced the arrest of al-Shabaab and ISIS members who were accused of planning attacks in Addis Ababa and other parts of Ethiopia. Current information indicates that terrorist organizations continue to plan terrorist attacks against U.S. citizens and Western targets and interests in East Africa, as well as against high-profile targets within those countries that contribute troops to the African Union Mission in Somalia, including Ethiopia.

Terrorist groups and those inspired by such organizations are intent on attacking U.S. citizens abroad. Terrorists are increasingly using less sophisticated methods of attack – including knives, firearms, and vehicles – to more effectively target crowds. Frequently, their aim is unprotected or vulnerable targets, such as: 

  • High-profile public events (sporting contests, political rallies, demonstrations, holiday events, celebratory gatherings, etc.) 
  • Hotels, clubs, and restaurants frequented by tourists 
  • Places of worship 
  • Schools 
  • Parks 
  • Shopping malls and markets 
  • Public transportation systems (including subways, buses, trains, and commercial flights)

For more information, see our  Terrorism  page.

Civil Unrest: Ethiopia has experienced sporadic and spontaneous civil unrest throughout the country, some of which has ended in violence. During such episodes, the Ethiopian government often curtails or limits mobile telecommunications, internet access, and social media. If this happens, you may be unable to contact family and friends or emergency services. The U.S. Embassy does not provide internet access to private individuals.

U.S. government personnel must request permission for personal and official travel outside of Addis Ababa and are required to carry personnel tracking devices and, in some cases, satellite phones.

U.S. government personnel may not take personal trips to:

  • All national border regions of Ethiopia
  • Gambella (except Gambella City)
  • Benishangul Gumuz (except Assosa City)
  • Some areas in western and southern parts of Oromia region
  • Tigray region
  • Amhara region

U.S. government personnel may only travel to Gambella City and Assosa City by plane. 

Western areas of Oromia: Wollega zones that include Kellem Wollega, West Wollega, Horro-Guduru Wollega and parts of East Wollega have reported civil unrest including fighting involving armed groups.

Southern areas of Oromia: West Guji zone has reported civil unrest including fighting involving armed groups.

Ethiopia’s Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region (SNNPR): Civil unrest in the region, particularly in Bench Sheko Zone and Konso Special Woreda, has resulted in deaths, looting, and the burning of buildings.

Border with Kenya: There have been numerous incidents of inter-ethnic conflict reported near the border areas with Kenya, as well as attacks attributed to the Oromo Liberation Army (OLA or OLF-Shane). Criminal activity in this border area remains a concern.

Tigray and Border with Eritrea: Due to conflict in the region, Tigray and the border with Eritrea are currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel. Due to the current situation in Tigray, the border roads with Eritrea are closed. Conditions at the border may change with no warning.

Border with South Sudan (Gambella Region): The security situation in the region is volatile. Sporadic inter-ethnic clashes are common along the western border area with South Sudan. Past tribal conflict between Anyuak, Nuer, and Highlanders resulted in numerous casualties. As with other border areas, landmines and criminal activity remain a concern.

Border with Sudan: There have been numerous incidents of armed clashes reported near the border area between Sudan and Ethiopia over disputed land.

Somali Region (eastern Ethiopia): Al-Shabaab maintains a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting risk of cross-border attacks and kidnapping. As with other border areas, landmines and criminal activity remain a concern. U.S. government personnel may not take personal trips to the Somali region.

Afar: Violent crime, including the armed assault of foreigners, has occurred in the Danakil Depression in Afar. While recent reports may indicate the Danakil Depression area is safe for tourism, please note that tourism was previously targeted for attacks in 2007, 2012, and 2017. It is not recommended to use the Mekelle route to this or other tourist sites in the Afar region due to the current situation in the Tigray region. Travelers should remain alert for changing conditions and the potential for criminal activity in these areas. Travel to areas bordering Tigray is not recommended due to conflict in that region. Additionally, ethnic conflicts between Afar and Somalis in the southern border areas of Afar have been reported.

Amhara: As a result of the Tigray conflict, tensions continue to exist along the Amhara-Tigray regional border, with occasional clashes including gunfire. Ethnic violence has been reported. While attacks are mostly related to inter-ethnic disputes and foreigners have not been targeted, attacks can occur at any time with the risk of being caught in violence. If you are travelling in the area, monitor local media and follow the advice of local authorities.

Crime in Addis Ababa: Pickpocketing, purse snatching, theft from vehicles and other petty crimes are common in Addis Ababa. Theft of passports is common in Bole International Airport, including inside the airport terminal and during airport transfers. Thieves are active throughout the city at all times, particularly on Bole Road, in the Piazza, the Merkato, and other areas frequented by tourists and foreigners. Violent robberies have also occurred in this area, with victims stabbed or beaten. Further, a number of violent robberies on hikers in Entoto Park, Yeka Park (behind the British Embassy), and the Guellele Botanical Gardens in Addis Ababa have been reported.

Safety Precautions:

  • Review your personal safety and security posture, remain vigilant, and exercise caution when visiting prominent public places and landmarks where westerners gather on a routine or predictable basis.
  • Avoid unattended baggage or packages left in any location, including in taxis.
  • Monitor consular messages.
  • Avoid travel outside of major towns, particularly along border areas (Kenya, Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan, and South Sudan).
  • Avoid walking alone.
  • Do not display cash and valuable personal property.
  • Secure your valuables and travel documents.
  • Drive with doors locked and windows closed or rolled up enough at all times to prevent theft while stopped in traffic.

Demonstrations  occur frequently. They may take place in response to political or economic issues, on politically significant holidays, and during international events.

  • Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and possibly become violent.
  • Avoid areas around protests and demonstrations.
  • Check local media for updates and traffic advisories.

International Financial Scams:  See the  Department of State  and the  FBI  pages for information.

Victims of Crime: U.S. citizen victims of crime in Addis Ababa should contact the Addis Ababa Police at 011-111-1011 or 991 from your local cell phone and may call the U.S. Embassy at 011-130-6000/6911. Crimes occurring outside of Addis Ababa should be reported to the Ethiopian Federal Police at 011-126-4359/4377. Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crime.

See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .

We can: 

  • Help you find appropriate medical care
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police 
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent 
  • Provide general information regarding the victim’s role during the local investigation and following its conclusion 
  • Provide a list of local attorneys
  • Provide our information on  victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution 
  • Help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport 

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact the Embassy for assistance. 

Tourism:  The tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities do not commonly occur. Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the host government or by recognized authorities in the field. In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in/near major cities. First responders are generally unable to access areas outside of major cities and to provide urgent medical treatment. U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance. See our webpage for more  information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Please note that in the event you are arrested and then released on bail, standard practice is that the police will retain foreign passports pending a final hearing. Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities, prior to practicing or operating a business.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website. 

Photography: It is illegal to take pictures of government buildings, military installations, police/military personnel, and key infrastructure such as roads, bridges, dams, and airfields. If you are caught photographing prohibited sites, you could be fined, your photographic equipment could be confiscated, and you could be detained and/or arrested. As a general practice, you should avoid taking pictures of individuals without their clear consent.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our  webpage  for further information.

Phone Service: Cellular phones are the main method of communication in Ethiopia; other telephone service is unreliable, and landlines are nearly non-existent. Cell phones brought into Ethiopia must be registered with the Ethiopian Revenue and Customs Authority. Phones can be registered either at Bole International Airport or at any Ethio Telecom shop. SIM cards are available for local purchase from Ethio Telecom, but will only work with phones that have been registered. As noted, cell phone access may be cut off without warning.

Currency: The Ethiopian Birr (ETB) is the currency of Ethiopia and, with the exception of international hotel bills, payment for commercial transactions in any other currency is illegal. Credit cards are accepted at only a few outlets in Addis Ababa. Foreign currency may only be exchanged legally at banks.

Ethiopian Refugee Camps: All access to refugee camps must be preapproved by the UNHCR and Ethiopian government. You may be detained and deported if you attempt to gain access without proper permissions.

Calendar: The Ethiopian calendar is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia. Some Ethiopians set their clocks differently than is standard practice elsewhere, resulting in significant time differences. Double check bookings and appointments to avoid confusion.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report  – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report  – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad  

LGBTI Travelers: Consensual same-sex sexual activity between adults is illegal and punishable by imprisonment under the law. There have been periodic detentions and interrogations of some LGBTI persons, and alleged physical abuse. Ethiopians do not generally publicly identify themselves as LGBTI due to severe societal stigma. There are some reports of violence against LGBTI individuals; reporting is limited due to fear of retribution, discrimination, or stigmatization. There is no law prohibiting discrimination against LGBTI persons and some LGBTI activists have reported being followed and at times fearing for their safety. Outside the major international hotels, same-sex couples may be unable to share a room. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights Report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: See The Ethiopian Center for Disability and Development guidebook with information on accessible hotel accommodations and transportation (including the new Addis Ababa metro). Persons with disabilities have limited access to transportation, communication, accommodations, and public buildings. There are few sidewalks and no curb-cuts, and most buildings lack functioning elevators. Landlords are required to give persons with disabilities preference for ground floor apartments.

Students: See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers: Domestic violence, including spousal abuse, is pervasive. Domestic violence and rape cases often are delayed significantly and given low priority. Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is illegal, but the prohibition is not actively enforced. Many women and girls have undergone FGM/C. It is much less common in urban areas. See our travel tips for Women Travelers .

Natural Disasters: Ethiopia’s geographic location in the western escarpment of the Great Rift Valley and the Horn of Africa increases its vulnerability to natural disasters, including flooding (and related landslides) during the summer rainy season, drought, and seismic events.

Consult the  CDC website for Ethiopia  prior to travel.

For emergency services in Ethiopia, dial the following numbers:

  • Addis Ababa Police Commission Emergency: 991/922
  • Fire (Addis Ababa): 939
  • Traffic Police (Addis Ababa): 945
  • Ambulance (Ethiopian Red Cross Society in Addis Ababa): 907

Medical care is extremely limited and health care facilities are only adequate for stabilization and emergency care. There is a shortage of physicians and other qualified medical personnel, as well as medical supplies, including, but not limited to, respirators, oxygen, and medications.  Emergency, ambulance, and psychiatric services are also limited. All care providers, both public and private, require payment or a cash deposit in Ethiopian birr before treatment is performed.

Ambulance services are not present throughout the country or are unreliable in most areas except Addis Ababa. Ambulances are also not generally staffed with trained paramedics and often have little or no medical equipment. Injured or seriously ill travelers may prefer to take a taxi or private vehicle to the nearest major hospital rather than wait for an ambulance.

The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa will not pay medical bills.   Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas. Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance. Some clinics will require payment prior to service or prior to checkout.

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See the Embassy webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. Visit the  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  for more information on the type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas. It is strongly recommended that you obtain supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

Always carry your prescription medication in its original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. If the quantity of drugs exceeds that which would be expected for personal use, a permit from the Ministry of Health is required. Check with the Ethiopian Food and Drug Administration (EFDA) at +251-11-552-41-22 or *8484* to ensure the medication is legal in Ethiopia. 

Altitude:   Many cities in Ethiopia, including Addis Ababa, are at high altitude. Be aware of the symptoms of altitude sickness and take precautions before you travel.  Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about  travel to high altitude locations .

The following diseases are prevalent in Ethiopia:

  • Diarrheal diseases 
  • Cholera 
  • Hepatitis A 
  • Malaria 
  • Measles 
  • Meningitis 
  • Polio 
  • Rabies 
  • Schistosomiasis 
  • Tuberculosis 
  • Yellow Fever

Vaccinations:  Ensure you are up to date on all  vaccinations  recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Note that when traveling to certain other countries from Ethiopia, proof of Yellow Fever vaccination may be required. 

Further health information:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Air Quality:  Visit  AirNow Department of State  for information on air quality at U.S. Embassies and Consulates.

The U.S. Embassy maintains a list of  doctors and hospitals but does not endorse or recommend any specific medical provider or clinic. 

Travel and Transportation

U.S. government officials and their families are advised to travel between major cities by air. They are prohibited from using inter- or intra-city bus transportation and travelling by road outside urban areas at night.

Road Conditions and Safety: Traffic accidents occur regularly in Addis Ababa and throughout the country. Roads are ill maintained, inadequately marked, and poorly lit. Excessive speed, erratic driving habits, pedestrians, stray animals, and lack of vehicle maintenance pose other hazards. Travel with other vehicles outside of cities during daylight hours only, due to the threat of roadside bandits, and be sure to carry additional fuel, a spare tire, and provisions. Professional roadside assistance service is not available.

Traffic Laws: You will need an Ethiopian driver’s license to drive in Ethiopia. In order to obtain an Ethiopian’s driver’s license, you will need an authenticated copy of your U.S. driver’s license. For more information on authentication, visit the Department of State’s Office of Authentications . The Embassy does not authenticate U.S. driver’s licenses. Use of cell phones while driving is prohibited. Use of seat belts is required. It is illegal to give money to beggars who approach vehicles stopped in traffic.

Accidents: In the event of an automobile accident, remain inside the vehicle and wait for police. It is illegal to move your vehicle before a police officer arrives. If a hostile mob forms or you feel your safety is in danger, however, leave the scene and proceed directly to the nearest police station to report the incident.

Public Transportation: Public transport is unregulated and unsafe. Avoid all travel by public transportation and hire private transport from a reliable source. Buses are in poor mechanical condition and are often filled well beyond capacity.

While taxis are available in Ethiopia, most do not meet U.S. safety standards. In Addis Ababa, green and yellow metered taxis are generally newer and in better condition than other taxis. The hiring of private transportation from a reliable source and/or use of hotel provided transportation is recommended.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Ethiopia’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Ethiopia’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page .

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in Ethiopia .  For additional IPCA-related information, please see the  International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA )  report.

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ethiopia travel cdc

News / Press Releases

Ethiopia Updates Travel Advisory: African Union COVID-19 Pass Now Required for Entry and Exit

ethiopia travel cdc

Download PDF:   Ethiopia Travel Advisory – AU COVID-19 Pass Now Required for Entry and Exit

ethiopia travel cdc

2 June 2021

Emergency Response and Preparedness

Central Africa , Eastern Africa , Northern Africa , Southern Africa , Western Africa

AMSP , AVATT , Africa , AfricanUnion , COVID19 , COVID19Africa , COVID19Vaccine , Coronavirus , Digital , Disease , Health , Logistics , Medical , Medtech , Pandemic , Tech , Vaccination , Vaccines

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About travel and border health service

Globalization and technology have made the world more connected than ever. Human mobility is a complex and dynamic phenomenon that has been attributed to amplify the spread of infectious diseases.

If you are not prepared, international travel can be hazardous to your health. The first step in preparing for international travel is to consult with a travel health service center. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that travelers consult with a travel health professional at least 2 weeks before departure.

The Travel and Border Health Service Directorate at Ethiopian Public Health Institute ensures the existences of the recommended International Health Regulation (IHR-2005) principles concerning travel-related diseases of public health interest.

Travel Health Services include

  • Consultation : The health professionals will assess your individual needs taking into account each destination on your itinerary, personal medical needs and so on. Based on WHO latest information issued, the health professionals will provide a personal recommendation.
  • Recommended vaccine : Not a must to have but taking a vaccination recommended and this include the majority of travel vaccines.
  • Required vaccines : These are required by a country for entry in order to protect the health of their citizens form travelers who may import the disease. Yellow fever, meningitis and polio are the most common required vaccines.

Information For Travellers

What is cholera.

Cholera is an acute bacterial intestinal infection caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholera O1 or O139. The disease often causes profuse watery diarrhea, vomiting, circulatory collapse, and shock. Many infections are associated with milder diarrhea or have no symptoms at all but if left untreated severe cholera cases up to 50% can be deadly.

Cholera is endemic to 50 countries primarily found in South and Southeast Asia and Africa but currently, other destinations including countries in the Caribbean and Middle East have active Cholera Transmission.

As the bacteria can be found in fresh and salty water the infections are mostly acquired from untreated drinking water or the feces of an infected person. Other common vehicles include raw or undercooked food, especially fish and shellfish.

People who do not follow hand washing recommendations, and/or do not use latrines or other sanitation systems are at increased risk for infection. Travelers with the greatest risk for exposure & infection are those going to endemic or outbreak areas, humanitarian aid workers, refugees and internally displaced people.

What are the symptoms of cholera Infection?

Infection is often mild or asymptomatic, but severe cholera occurs in about 10% of cholera episodes and is characterized by profuse watery diarrhea, described as rice-water stools, often accompanied by nausea and vomiting that can rapidly lead to severe dehydration, and death within hours.

Apart from clinical diagnosis laboratory confirmation is made using numerous diagnostic methods including rapid diagnostic tests and RT-PCR.

Timely rehydration therapy is the basis of cholera treatment with oral rehydration solution and, if necessary intravenous fluids and electrolytes. Antibiotics will also reduce fluid requirements and duration of illness and are indicated in conjunction with rehydration treatment.

Travelers most importantly should follow the way to prevent cholera infection by practicing safe food and water handling precautions and frequent hand washing.

Cholera is a vaccine-preventable disease and generally, routine vaccination is not recommended for travelers if you are not at the greatest risk for exposure & infection (i.e., humanitarian aid workers, going to endemic or outbreak areas, and health care workers in direct contact with cases) and currently, no country or territory requires vaccination against cholera as a condition for entry.

Useful tips

  • Cholera is an acute watery diarrheal disease with a high fatality if left untreated.
  • Choler is endemic in South and Southeast Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the island of Hispaniola.
  • Travelers who consistently observe safe food, water, sanitation, and hand hygiene precautions have virtually no risk of infection
  • Cholera is a vaccine-preventable disease.
  • While in Ethiopia, for any inquiries please call toll-free 8335 or visit  https://ephi.gov.et/travel-health-service/

Marburg virus disease

What is Marburg virus disease?

Marburg virus disease (MVD) is a rare but severe hemorrhagic fever caused by the Marburg virus, members of the filovirus family.

Marburg virus was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, Germany and in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia). The first people infected had been exposed to Ugandan imported African green monkeys or their tissues while conducting research. That same year, an American traveller developed MVD after returning to the US from Uganda and recovered. Both travellers had visited a well-known cave inhabited by fruit bats in a national park.

The reservoir host of Marburg virus is a type of cave-dwelling fruit bat native to Africa called the Egyptian rousette bat. Bats infected with Marburg virus do not show obvious signs of illness. Primates (including people) can become infected with Marburg virus, which can cause serious illness or death. Many past outbreaks started with male mine workers in bat-infested mines and then spread within their communities.

What are the symptoms of MVD?

After an incubation period of 2-21 days, symptom onset is sudden and marked by fever, chills, headache, myalgia (Muscle pain) and non-itchy rash. Severe watery diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, nausea and vomiting can begin on the third day. Symptoms become increasingly severe and can include jaundice, inflammation of the pancreas, severe weight loss, delirium, shock, liver failure, massive hemorrhaging, and multi-organ dysfunction.

Clinical diagnosis of Marburg virus disease (MVD) can be difficult, as early nonspecific manifestation of the disease may mimic other infectious diseases such as malaria, typhoid fever and meningitis or viral haemorrhagic fevers that may be endemic in the area (such as Ebola). Confirmation is made using numerous diagnostic methods including RT-PCR.

Prevention and treatment of MVD

Preventive measures against Marburg virus infection include avoiding fruit bats and sick non-human primates and precautions to prevent the secondary transmission (person-to-person) including wearing of personal protective equipment’s (PPEs). Better awareness can lead to earlier and stronger precautions against the spread of Marburg virus.

Currently there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments approved for MVD. However, supportive care including rehydration with oral or intravenous fluids and treatment of specific symptoms, improves survival.

  • MVD is preventable disease, but it kills in a short time.
  • MVD is a disease that can easily be transmitted from person to person through contact with the body fluids of an infected person.
  • MVD can be prevented by washing hands regularly with soap and water.
  • Report any suspected cases of MVD to the nearest health facility
  • While in Ethiopia , for any inquire please call toll free 8335 or visit https://ephi.gov.et/travel-health-service/

Ebola Viral disease

What is Ebola virus disease (EVD) 

Ebola virus disease is a deadly hemorrhagic disease caused by Virus called Ebola virus. The disease often causes high fever and bleeding from various body holes. The current outbreaks of Ebola viral disease in Uganda is caused by species  Sudan Ebolavirus disease. O utbreaks by the species of Sudan virus first reported in southern Sudan in June 1976, since then seven outbreaks, four in Uganda and three in Sudan have been reported.

The virus is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as fruit bats, chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, forest antelope or porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest. The virus then spreads through human-to-human transmission via direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with either blood or body fluids of a person who is sick with or has died from EVD or objects that have been contaminated with body fluids (like blood, feces, vomit) from a person sick with EVD or the body of a person who died from EVD.

The incubation period ranges from 2 to 21 days. People infected with Sudan virus cannot spread the disease until they develop symptoms, and they remain infectious as long as their blood contains the virus.

What are the symptoms of Ebola?

Symptoms of EVD can be sudden and include fever, fatigue, muscle pain, headache, and sore throat later followed by vomiting, diarrhea, rash, symptoms of impaired kidney and liver function. In some cases, the patient might present both internal and external bleeding (for example, bleeding from the gums, or blood in the stools).

The diagnosis of EVD can be difficult, as early nonspecific manifestation of the disease may mimic other infectious diseases such as malaria, typhoid fever and meningitis. Confirmation is made using numerous diagnostic methods including RT-PCR.

Prevention and treatment of EVD

Supportive care – rehydration with oral or intravenous fluids – and treatment of specific symptoms improve survival.

There are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of Sudan virus disease.

  • Ebola is preventable disease, but it kills in a short time.
  • Ebola is a disease that can easily be transmitted from person to person through contact with the body fluids of an infected person.
  • Ebola can be prevented by washing hands regularly with soap and water.
  • Report any suspected cases of Ebola to the nearest health facility

What is mPox (Monkey pox)?

mPox is a viral zoonosis disease (Animal origin) caused by infection with mPox virus. Previously mPox occurs in central and West Africa but the current outbreak is occurring around the world in areas where mPox is not usually found.

The mode of transmission is Human-to-human to animal-to-human transmission. Human-to-human transmition occurs from close contact with respiratory secretions and skin lesions of an infected person or recently contaminated objects. Transmission can also occur via the placenta from mother to fetus or during close contact during and after birth.

Animal-to-human transmission can occur by bite or scratch of infected animals and from direct contact with the blood or other bodily fluids and lesions of infected animals.

Symptoms of mPox

People infected with mPox develop a rash that can look like pimples or blisters and the rash may be painful or itchy, similar to those seen in the past in smallpox patients, although it is clinically less severe.

The symptoms of mPox can include Fever, Headache, Muscle and back pain, swollen lymph nodes, Chills, Exhaustion and Respiratory symptoms (e.g. sore throat, nasal congestion, or cough). The illness typically lasts from 6 to 13 days but can range from 5 to 21 days.

Who is at risk?

Anyone in close contact with a person with mPox can get it and should take steps to protect themselves.

Prevention and treatment Measures

There is no specific vaccine and treatment developed for mPox but some clinical studies demonstrated that Smallpox vaccine is about 85% effective in preventing the disease.

Travelers can  protect themselves  against infection by taking the following steps.

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact including kissing, hugging, or having sex with people who have a rash that looks like mPox.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer; especially before eating or touching your face and after you use the bathroom.
  • In Central and West Africa, avoid contact with animals that can spread mPox virus, usually rodents and primates.
  • If you have symptoms of MPox or had close contact with someone who has mPox, talk to your healthcare provider.
  • If you have symptoms, do not travel until you recover or confirm you do not have mPox.

Yellow Fever

What is yellow fever ?

Yellow fever (YF) is a serious illness caused by the YF virus. YF is usually passed on to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. YF can vary from a flu-like illness that gets better on its own over several days to a severe illness with fever, jaundice (turning yellow), bleeding and organ failure. There is no specific medicine to treat YF. Up to 5% of infected people will die if they are not treated immediately.

Occurrence of YF disease?

The disease in Africa and Latin America in 44 countries. It causes with a estimation of 200,000 illnesses and up to 30,000 deaths, and the data shows the YF proved to be found in some places in our country.

The main symptoms of yellow fever

Many people do not experience symptoms, but when these do occur, the most common are:

  • Muscle pain with prominent backache,
  • Loss of appetite, and
  • Nausea or vomiting.

A small percentage of patients, however, enter a second phase, more toxic phase within 24 hours of recovering from initial symptoms. High fever returns and several body systems are affected, usually the liver and the kidneys. In this phase people are likely to develop jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes, hence the name ‘yellow fever’), dark urine and abdominal pain with vomiting. Bleeding can occur from the mouth, nose, eyes or stomach.

How to Prevent?

  • Wearing long -sleeved shirts and
  • Insect repellents,
  • The travelers should have the vaccine at least 10 days before you travel
  • The vaccine provides lifelong protection

Note: Travelers to YF areas should do both things

What is the Treatment ?

A person who feels the above symptoms should immediately go to the health center and get the necessary professional advice and examination. If a person infected with yellow fever does not get early diagnosis and medical help, it can lead to death.

  • Take the vaccine before Travel
  • Any persons with high fever and yellow eyes should seek to a health facility as they may have yellow fever; Notify the nearest health office or governing body immediately.

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Zika Travel Information

This page is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being updated. The content below shows the page as it was on May 15, 2024. For the latest Zika risk map, visit Countries and Territories at Risk for Zika .

Check this page for the most up-to-date information before you make travel plans.

Note:  The information on this page is for travelers to  international destinations and US territories . For information on Zika in US states, visit  Zika in the US . For the most current information about Zika virus, please visit  CDC’s Zika website .

Search for a place by name or zoom and click on the map to see CDC's travel recommendations for Zika. Follow the links in the pop-up message to learn more.

PDF version of the map  (printable)

Zika Travel Recommendations by Traveler Type and Country Category

Know before you go! Zika continues to be a problem in many parts of the world. There is no vaccine to prevent infection. Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected  Aedes  species mosquito ( Ae. aegypti  and  Ae. albopictus ). Zika can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Infection during pregnancy can cause certain birth defects.

Your decision to delay or cancel travel is personal and complex. In making this decision, consider your travel destination and your ability to protect yourself from mosquito bites. CDC recommends that pregnant women and couples planning a pregnancy within the next 3 months consult with a health care provider in making this decision.

Recommendations for US Residents Traveling Abroad

1 These countries have a potential risk of Zika, but we do not have accurate information on the current level of risk. As a result, detection and reporting of new outbreaks may be delayed.

2 Because  Aedes aegypti  mosquitoes (the mosquitoes that most commonly spreads Zika) are present in these countries, Zika has the potential to be present, along with other mosquito-borne infections. Detection and reporting of cases and outbreaks may be delayed.

3 No  Aedes aegypti  mosquitoes (the mosquitoes that most commonly spreads Zika) have been reported in these countries. However, other  Aedes  species mosquitoes have been known to spread Zika, and these may be present.

Areas with Zika outbreaks (red areas):

Areas with current or past transmission but no Zika outbreak (purple areas):   American Samoa, Angola, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Bonaire, Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curacao, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Easter Island, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, Gabon, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mexico, Montserrat, New Caledonia, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Saba, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Senegal, Singapore, Sint Eustatius, Sint Maarten, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos, Uganda, United States (Continental US), United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam

Areas with mosquitoes but no reported Zika cases (yellow areas):  Afghanistan,  Australia, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Brunei, Chad, China, Christmas Island, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, East Timor, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Georgia, Ghana, Guam, Liberia, Madagascar, Madeira Islands, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Niger, Niue, Northern Mariana Islands, Oman, Pakistan, Russia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Taiwan, Tanzania, The Gambia, Togo, Tokelau, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uruguay, Wallis and Futuna, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Areas with no mosquitoes that spread Zika (green areas):   Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Azores, Bahrain, Belarus, Belgium, Bermuda, Bosnia and Herzegovina, British Indian Ocean Territory, Bulgaria, Canada, Canary Islands, Chile, Cocos Islands, Comoros, Corsica, Croatia, Crozet Islands, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Eswatini, Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Finland, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kerguelen Islands, Kosovo, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Malta, Mauritius, Mayotte, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norfolk Island, North Korea, North Macedonia, Norway, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Saint Helena, Saint Paul and New Amsterdam Islands, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, San Marino, São Tomé and Principe, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Vatican City, Wake Island, Western Sahara

Technical note : Because of variations in laboratory and surveillance capacity internationally, data are not available to define levels of risk. CDC, the World Health Organization, and the European CDC have jointly reviewed the scientific literature.

  • Pregnant Women
  • Couples Trying to Become Pregnant
  • Visiting Friends or Family in an Area with Zika
  • US Citizens and Residents Living in Areas with Ongoing Zika Virus Transmission
  • Zika: For Healthcare Providers  on CDC's Zika site
  • Zika  in CDC Yellow Book
  • Clinical Guidance for Healthcare Providers Caring for Pregnant Women
  • Update: Interim Guidance for Preconception Counseling and Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus for Men with Possible Zika Virus Exposure — United States, August 2018

Travelers can prevent Zika

Infographic: Travelers Can Protect Themselves from Zika

Zika travel brochure

Zika: A Guide for Travelers (5-page brochure)

Zika: Una guía de los CDC para los viajeros

Zika infographics for travelers

Empaca para prevenir el Zika (video en español)

CDC Travelers' Health on Facebook

CDC Travelers' Health on Twitter

Get Email Updates

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  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
  • Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
  • You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link.
  • CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.

CDC Yellow Book

Yellow Fever

  • Requirements: Required if traveling from a country with risk of YF virus transmission and ≥9 months of age, including transit >12 hours in an airport located in a country with risk of YF virus transmission. 1
  • Recommendations:
  • Recommended for all travelers ≥9 months of age, except as mentioned below.
  • Generally not recommended for travelers whose itinerary is limited to the Afar and Somali Provinces (Map 2-13 ).
  • Areas with malaria: All areas below 2,500 m (8,202 ft), except none in the city of Addis Ababa (Map 2-14 ).
  • Drug resistance 3 : Chloroquine.
  • Malaria species: P. falciparum 60%–70%, P. vivax 30%–40%, P. malariae and P. ovale rare.
  • Recommended chemoprophylaxis: Atovaquone-proguanil, doxycycline, mefloquine, or tafenoquine. 4

Map 2-13. Yellow fever vaccine recommendations in Ethiopia1

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ethiopia travel cdc

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad
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Warnings and insurance

ethiopia travel cdc

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office ( FCDO ) provides advice about risks of travel to help British nationals make informed decisions. Find out more about FCDO travel advice .

Areas where FCDO advises against travel

Your travel insurance could be invalidated if you travel against FCDO advice. Consular support may be limited where FCDO advises against travel.

International border areas 

FCDO advises against all travel within:  

  • 20km of the border with Sudan 
  • 10km of the border with South Sudan 
  • 100km of the Ethiopian border with Somalia and Kenya in Ethiopia’s Somali region, and within 30km of the Ethiopian border with Somalia in Fafan zone, except the border town and crossing at Wajale, and the principal road between Jijiga and Wajale 
  • 10km of the border with Kenya, except for principal roads and towns 
  • 10km of the border with Eritrea 

Tigray region 

FCDO  advises against all travel to the Tigray region west of the Tekeze river and within 10km of the internal border with Amhara region.

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the remainder of the Tigray region except the towns and connecting roads of Mekelle:

  • southward to Maychew
  • northwards to Adigrat
  • west and north-westward to Abiy Addi, Adwa and Shire
  • eastward to Abala on the Tigray-Afar border

Amhara region 

FCDO advises against all travel to Amhara region. 

Afar region 

FCDO advises against all travel to areas of Afar region within:  

Gambella region 

FCDO advises against all travel to Gambella region. 

Oromia region 

FCDO advises against all travel to these areas of Oromia region:  

  • within 10km of the border with Kenya, except for principal roads and towns 
  • north of (but not including) the A4 road in West Shewa zone 
  • south and west of (but not including) the A3 road in North Shewa zone  
  • West Wollega zone (including the main Addis Ababa to Gambella road), East Wollega zone, Kellem Wollega and Horo Gudru Wollega  

FCDO  advises against all but essential travel to:

  • all of East Shewa zone except the Addis to Adama Expressway and 10km either side of the expressway between Addis Ababa and Bishoftu.
  • the A4 road between Addis Ababa and Cheliya, except for the section in in the Finfine special zone.
  • all of North Shewa Zone
  • West Guji and Guji zones

Somali Regional State 

FCDO advises against all travel to within: 

  • 100km of the Ethiopian border with Somalia and Kenya in Ethiopia’s Somali region  
  • 30km of the Ethiopian border with Somalia in Fafan zone, except the border town and crossing at Wajale, and the principal road between Jijiga and Wajale 

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to:  

  • the Siti zone 
  • the Nogob (previously Fik) 
  • Jarar (previously Degehabur) 
  • Shabelle (previously Gode) 
  • Korahe and Dollo (previously Warder) 
  • areas of Liben and Afder zones more than 100km from the Somalia and Kenya borders 

Central, Southern, Sidama and South West regions (formerly SNNPR) 

FCDO advises against all travel: 

  • within 10km of the borders with South Sudan and Kenya 

Benishangul-Gumuz region 

FCDO advises against all travel to these areas of Benishangul-Gumuz region: 

  • within 20km of the border with Sudan 
  • the Metekel zone and Maokomo special zone 

FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the rest of Benishangul-Gumuz region. 

Find out more about why FCDO advises against travel to these regions .

Before you travel 

No travel can be guaranteed safe. Read all the advice in this guide as well as support for British nationals abroad which includes:  

  • general advice on preparing for travel abroad and reducing risks 
  • information for women, LGBT+ and disabled travellers 

Follow and contact FCDO travel on Twitter , Facebook and Instagram . You can also sign up to get email notifications when this travel advice is updated.

Travel insurance 

If you choose to travel, research your destinations and get appropriate travel insurance . Insurance should cover your itinerary, planned activities and expenses in an emergency.  

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  • How It Spreads
  • Where Malaria Occurs
  • World Malaria Day 2024
  • Clinical Guidance: Malaria Diagnosis & Treatment in the U.S.
  • Clinical Features
  • Clinical Testing and Diagnosis
  • Malaria Risk Assessment for Travelers
  • Choosing a Drug to Prevent Malaria
  • How to Report a Case of Malaria
  • Public Health Strategy
  • Malaria's Impact Worldwide
  • Communication Resources

Every April 25, CDC joins the global community to highlight malaria, a serious parasitic disease spread to humans by a certain type of mosquito, Anopheles . Malaria remains a leading cause of preventable illness and death in the world.

world malaria day

CDC’s World Malaria Day Materials

World malaria day 2024: dear colleague letter.

ethiopia travel cdc

April 25, 2024

Dear Colleagues:

Today marks World Malaria Day, a day set aside to highlight the need for continued investment and sustained commitment to eliminate malaria. Malaria is a life-threatening disease spread to humans by Anopheles mosquitoes. It continues to be a cause of preventable illness and death in the world, resulting in nearly 249 million cases and 608,000 deaths across 85 countries in 2022. Africa bears the largest burden of malaria cases and deaths, with children and pregnant women being disproportionately affected. Children under five make up approximately 80% of malaria deaths in Africa, and malaria in pregnancy can lead to severe health consequences, including maternal and neonatal deaths.

Malaria also poses a threat domestically. There are nearly 2,000 cases of malaria reported each year, mostly due to international travel. However, last year, for the first time in 20 years, the United States experienced cases of locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria. Experts in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria sprang into action, supporting early detection and a prompt response. With our state and local partners in the lead, CDC acted as a technical co-pilot, strengthening public health capacity. Public health teams working together was essential in limiting further local spread beyond the 10 cases across four states (Florida, Texas, Maryland, and Arkansas), serving as an important reminder that a global problem can quickly become a local one.

CDC’s priority is to protect health and improve lives, and since 1946, CDC has been a global leader in malaria prevention and control. We have led the development of many of the gold-standard malaria vector surveillance and control methods that are used around the world today. CDC co-implements the President’s Malaria Initiative, which is led by the United States Agency for International Development. CDC also provides technical recommendations to the U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator, as well as in-country expertise, driving progress toward malaria elimination. These efforts have contributed to preventing at least 2.1 billion malaria cases and 11.7 million malaria deaths since 2000, but threats remain.

Threats, including drug and insecticide resistance, invasive mosquito species, severe weather events, and limitations with rapid diagnostic tests, pose ongoing challenges to eliminating malaria. This year's World Malaria Day theme, "Accelerating the Fight Against Malaria for a More Equitable World,” highlights the importance of action in addressing malaria Thus, CDC and our global partners must work together to develop new interventions and support public health innovations to quickly address these threats. Recently, CDC developed a new rapid, cost-effective test for detecting an invasive malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi. This mosquito, unlike other malaria vectors, is resistant to many key insecticides, thrives in urban areas, and is starting to spread across parts of Africa. This novel tool can be used in resource-limited settings, allowing us to detect this emerging threat early, closely monitor its spread, and support rapid response. Developing such innovative tools supports global efforts to combat malaria and demonstrates CDC’s expertise and unwavering commitment to staying ahead of emerging threats.

As we reflect on these accomplishments and the progress made, let us recommit ourselves to the goal of eliminating malaria and working together to overcome these challenges and end this preventable disease. Together, we can make a tangible difference in protecting the health and improving the lives of millions affected by malaria and contribute to a healthier, more resilient world.

Thank you for your ongoing dedication and partnership in this vital work.

Dr. Cohen CDC Director

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World Malaria Day Feature 2024: Leading with Malaria Control Innovation in Mind

Every April 25, CDC joins the global community to highlight malaria, a serious parasitic disease spread to humans by a certain type of mosquito, Anopheles . Malaria remains a leading cause of preventable illness and death in the world. In 2022 , there were approximately 249 million malaria cases and 608,000 malaria deaths in 85 countries. Malaria disproportionately impacts women and young families, with children under five making up approximately 80% of malaria deaths and pregnant women facing severe health outcomes. Africa carries the largest burden, accounting for approximately 94% (233 million) malaria cases and 95% (580,000) malaria deaths.

CDC continues to be a global leader in malaria work, with our state-of-the-art insectary and entomology labs providing a platform for innovative research to address malaria's threat. This past summer, a team from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM)'s Entomology Branch created an innovative, simple, and accessible loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for molecular identification of the invasive malaria vector Anopheles stephensi.

The team, led by molecular biologist Cristina Rafferty, included two interns from Summer 2023 through the Public Health Entomology for All (PHEFA) program :

  • JeNiyah Scaife
  • Gloria Raise

Understanding Anopheles stephensi (The threat)

Anopheles stephensi ( An. stephensi ) is a malaria vector native to South Asia but has since spread to Africa and poses a huge threat to the malaria landscape. In Africa, An. stephensi was first detected in Djibouti, a country that was on the cusp of malaria pre-elimination status in 2012 with only 27 presumed or confirmed cases. In 2020, malaria cases had reached more than 73,000, with many believing it was due to An. stephensi . On the African continent, the vector has also been detected in Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, and more recently Nigeria and Ghana. If the spread continues, estimates predict it could put an additional 126 million people per year at risk of malaria, mostly in peri-urban/urban areas.

An. stephensi is also different from typical African malaria vectors; it's both urban and peri-urban as opposed to typical rural vectors, has different feeding behaviors, can breed in man-made containers, and is not seasonal, thus having the potential to transmit malaria year-round. It is also resistant to common insecticides. These attributes make the most common malaria vector interventions (e.g., indoor residual sprays and insecticide-treated nets) less effective against An. stephensi.

Access to fast and accurate molecular tools is integral in confirming the presence of An. stephensi in new locations. This is because it can be difficult to distinguish from other vectors morphologically. Up until now, there were no easily accessible molecular tools to rapidly detect invasions of An. stephensi, leading to significant challenges to early detection as it continues to spread across Africa.

Creating an accessible assay (The tech)

This past summer, CDC's team created a rapid colorimetric loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for An. stephensi species identification, referred to as the CLASS assay. The team worked tirelessly rearing mosquitoes, conducting DNA extraction, analyzing PCRs and gels, and testing with different reagent concentrations at different times and temperatures. The team kept accessibility and field-friendliness at the forefront when designing the assay. Teams utilizing this assay do not need a full molecular laboratory nor highly trained molecular biologists to interpret the assays, which addresses major barriers that currently exist in the field.

Creating innovative tools to detect malaria vectors such as An. stephensi is key to global malaria control and elimination. Utilizing the CLASS assay will not only help with early detection and accurate identification of An. stephensi, but also further informs researchers on the changing malaria landscape and how to best prepare and rapidly respond.

A pre-print describing the CLASS assay is available now. Malaria programs have started to pilot the CLASS assay in countries, including Kenya, Ghana, Ethiopia, and Tanzania. The countries are using the assay for screening in the field, with additional follow up as necessary. The CDC team will gather valuable feedback from countries, further informing researchers about its use.

Gloria Raise, currently a senior at New Jersey Institute of Technology, works in the lab and pipets during the PHEFA internship.

Investing in a diverse entomology workforce (The team)

Two PHEFA interns, JeNiyah Scaife and Gloria Raise, under the mentorship of molecular biologist Cristina Rafferty, conducted much of the lab work that supported optimizing the CLASS assay. PHEFA, a joint program between the Entomological Society of America (ESA) and CDC, aims to expand and diversify the pool of scholars interested in and entering the public health entomology field. Scaife and Raise attend undergraduate institutions that take deliberate steps to recruit, enroll, and retain students from underrepresented populations. They both completed a rigorous application and interview process before being selected by DPDM. Though the students were rising seniors majoring in forensic science, they each wanted to learn more about entomology.

"[...] a lot of people don't even know what entomology is; there's very few schools that have an entomology program, so I guess the aim of the program is to show that there is entomology connected with public health [...] it kind of shows what the power of entomology can have, and the impact it can have on people's health and lives," says Raise.

In addition to learning more about the field, the direct experience was invaluable. "I learned more in 10 weeks than I've learned in an entire semester at school," says Scaife. "As far as using some of the instruments in the lab, I feel more confidently when it comes to running PCRs, or using the thermal cycler, or running a gel; I feel like I know it like the back of my hand. I looked forward to going to the lab every morning to see what we could get done throughout the day or something new I was going to learn." Exuding pride, Rafferty, who mentored these students, said, "not only did they help to change the course of how the world can detect An. stephensi, but they also gave me hope in there being a more diverse and ready public health entomology workforce."

JeNiyah Scaife, currently a senior at Fayetteville State North Carolina, works in the lab during the PHEFA internship.

As malaria continues to evolve as a global threat to human health, we must continue to invest in innovative approaches to detect, prevent, control, and one day, eliminate it. These approaches require diverse and inclusive thinking. Efforts like PHEFA interns working to optimize and develop the CLASS assay is a keystone example of why such methods are paramount in public health. DPDM is proud to have talented individuals with diverse backgrounds and experiences contributing to innovative work that improves how CDC can address emerging public health threats, ultimately protecting the lives and livelihoods of the most vulnerable.

Malaria Fact Sheets and Infographics

Malaria social media cards.

Malaria is a serious disease caused by a parasite that infects the Anopheles mosquito. You get malaria when bitten by an infective mosquito.

For Everyone

Health care providers, public health.

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  1. Ethiopia

    CDC recommends that travelers going to certain areas of Ethiopia take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. ... If your travel plans in Ethiopia include outdoor activities, take these steps ...

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    Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC's specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Ethiopia. Last Update: Reissued with update to the Travel Advisory level and risk indicators.

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    Review the Country Security Report for Ethiopia. U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler's Checklist. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. Tigray Region and Border with Eritrea - Do Not Travel

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    For travel to the United States on a temporary basis, including tourism, temporary employment, study and exchange. Read More. ... (CDC) is a trusted partner tackling some of the region's most challenging public health problems. CDC Ethiopia builds the capacity of the country's laboratories, health facilities and communities to detect ...

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    The Department of State revised its Travel Advisory for Ethiopia on June 7, 2021. The Department continues to advise travelers not to travel to Ethiopia due to COVID-19. ... Visit the CDC's webpage on Travel and COVID-19. Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans. Be aware of your surroundings.

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    Please visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page more information on entry/ exit requirements related to COVID-19 in Ethiopia.. Requirements for Entry: Passport; Visa; World Health Organization (WHO) card with yellow fever vaccination if coming from country with risk of yellow fever transmission (countries with risk of YF transmission)Visas: All U.S. citizens are required to obtain a visa to legally ...

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    According to the GOE, 36.8 million people have completed their vaccine series. The GOE has 15.1 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines available including AstraZeneca, J&J, Sino Pharm, and Pfizer for vaccination of adults age 18 years and over including U.S. citizens resident in Ethiopia. Pfizer is also available for adolescents age 12-17 years old.

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  14. Ethiopia Travel Advisory December 14, 2021

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  17. World Malaria Day 2024

    Malaria programs have started to pilot the CLASS assay in countries, including Kenya, Ghana, Ethiopia, and Tanzania. The countries are using the assay for screening in the field, with additional follow up as necessary. The CDC team will gather valuable feedback from countries, further informing researchers about its use.

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