Winter is here! Check out the winter wonderlands at these 5 amazing winter destinations in Montana

  • Travel Destinations
  • United States

Detroit Buildings – Touring The Abandoned Ones

Published: September 6, 2023

Modified: December 27, 2023

by Clarette Peace

  • Arts & Culture
  • Plan Your Trip
  • Travel Essentials & Accessories
  • Travel Tips

detroit-buildings-touring-the-abandoned-ones

Introduction

Detroit, known as the Motor City and the birthplace of Motown, is a city drenched in both history and decay. Despite its rich heritage and vibrant past, many of its iconic buildings now stand abandoned, hinting at a faded glory. These abandoned structures serve as reminders of the rise and fall of Detroit and have become a magnet for urban explorers and photographers seeking to capture the beauty in decay.

In its heyday, Detroit boasted some of the most magnificent architecture in the country. The city was a thriving hub of industry and culture, attracting people from all walks of life. However, as economic decline hit the city in the late 20th century, many businesses shuttered, leaving behind a trail of abandoned buildings that once housed bustling factories, theaters, and offices.

These abandoned buildings have a poignant story to tell, reflecting the city’s economic struggles and the impact they have had on the local community. From grand theaters that once showcased performances by legendary artists to derelict factories that were at the forefront of automotive innovation, each structure holds a piece of Detroit’s past.

Exploring these abandoned buildings offers a fascinating glimpse into a bygone era. Intricate architectural details, decaying walls, and overgrown vegetation create a hauntingly beautiful atmosphere that resonates with anyone who steps foot inside. Urban explorers navigate through dark corridors, climb crumbling staircases, and wander through vast empty spaces, experiencing a mix of excitement and melancholy.

Photographers are particularly drawn to these abandoned buildings, as they provide a unique backdrop for capturing images that evoke a sense of nostalgia and mystery. The interplay between light and shadow, the contrast of decay and remnants of the past, all contribute to the ethereal beauty that can be found within these abandoned structures.

Despite the allure of exploring these forgotten buildings, it’s important to remember that they can be dangerous and unstable. Venturing into these structures should only be done with proper caution and respect for the surroundings.

In this article, we will take you on a virtual tour of some of the most intriguing abandoned buildings in Detroit. From former theaters to industrial sites, we will delve into their history, the reasons behind their abandonment, and the ongoing efforts to preserve them as part of Detroit’s heritage.

Historic Importance of Detroit Buildings

Detroit’s buildings hold immense historic importance, as they reflect the city’s rise as a global industrial powerhouse and its contributions to American culture. Many of these buildings played a pivotal role in shaping the city’s identity and leaving a lasting mark on the nation’s history.

One of the most iconic buildings in Detroit is the Michigan Central Station. Built in 1913, this Beaux-Arts masterpiece served as the city’s main passenger rail depot and served as a symbol of the city’s prosperity. The station’s grand architecture and intricate detailing showcased Detroit’s ambition and its status as the automotive capital of the world. Despite being abandoned for decades, it remains an architectural gem that represents the city’s past glory.

Another significant building is the Fox Theatre. Constructed in 1928, this stunning theater is a testament to Detroit’s thriving entertainment industry. With its lavish design and seating capacity of over 5,000, it hosted countless performances by renowned entertainers such as Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, and the Rolling Stones. Today, the Fox Theatre is still in operation, serving as a cultural landmark and a symbol of Detroit’s enduring spirit.

The Fisher Building, completed in 1928, is yet another remarkable structure. Its opulent design and art-deco style are a testament to the city’s prosperity during the roaring twenties. At the time of its construction, it was the tallest building in Detroit. It served as the headquarters of the Fisher Body Company, an automotive body manufacturing company that played a crucial role in Detroit’s automotive industry.

These buildings, along with many others, contributed to Detroit’s reputation as a center of innovation and cultural significance. They embodied the city’s determination, resilience, and creativity.

Furthermore, Detroit’s architectural heritage extends beyond commercial and entertainment buildings. The city’s residential architecture showcases a variety of styles, ranging from Tudor and Victorian to Craftsman and Mid-Century Modern. Neighborhoods like Boston-Edison and Indian Village are known for their well-preserved historic homes, providing a glimpse into the city’s affluent past.

These historic buildings not only represent Detroit’s past but also serve as a source of inspiration for future generations. They provide a tangible link to the city’s history and remind us of the importance of preserving our architectural heritage.

In the next sections, we will explore the reasons behind the abandonment of some of these buildings and take a closer look at their current state.

Reasons for Abandonment

The abandonment of Detroit’s buildings can be attributed to a combination of economic, social, and demographic factors that have impacted the city over the decades. Understanding these reasons helps shed light on the challenges faced by Detroit and the struggles in preserving its architectural treasures.

One of the primary reasons for the abandonment of buildings in Detroit is the city’s economic decline. As the automotive industry, which was once the backbone of Detroit’s economy, faced challenges and restructuring, many businesses closed or relocated, leaving behind vacant structures. The decline in manufacturing jobs and the subsequent loss of population further exacerbated the issue, as there was less demand for commercial and residential space.

Urban decay and disinvestment also played a significant role in the abandonment of buildings. In some areas of Detroit, disinvestment led to a downward spiral of neglect and blight, with buildings falling into disrepair due to neglect and lack of maintenance. This created a snowball effect, as decaying buildings attracted crime and further deterred investment in the area. The financial burden of rehabilitating these structures often outweighed the potential returns, leaving them abandoned.

Additionally, racial tensions and social unrest in the 1960s and 1970s led to massive population shifts as white residents fled the city for the suburbs. This “white flight” further contributed to the decline of Detroit’s urban areas. The exodus of residents left behind vacant buildings and created a cycle of disinvestment and decline.

Structural issues and the high cost of renovation are also factors in the abandonment of buildings. Some structures were simply too outdated or damaged to be economically feasible to restore. Limited access to financing and a lack of resources for preservation projects have made it difficult to save these buildings from deterioration.

However, it’s important to note that the reasons behind the abandonment of Detroit’s buildings are not solely negative. As the city undergoes a revitalization process, some abandoned buildings are being repurposed and transformed into creative spaces, offices, or residential units. This adaptive reuse highlights the potential for breathing new life into these neglected structures and reclaiming Detroit’s architectural heritage.

In the next sections, we will embark on a journey to explore some of the abandoned buildings in Detroit, witnessing both their architectural beauty and the challenges they face.

Exploring the Abandoned Buildings

Exploring the abandoned buildings of Detroit is a thrilling and captivating experience for urban explorers and history enthusiasts alike. These structures provide a glimpse into a bygone era and offer a unique perspective on the city’s history and culture.

As you step foot inside these forgotten buildings, a sense of curiosity and adventure fills the air. The silence is deafening as you walk through the crumbling hallways, peering into empty rooms and forgotten spaces. The play of light and shadow adds to the haunting atmosphere, making it feel like you’ve stepped into a different time.

Each abandoned building has its own story to tell. From former factories that were once at the forefront of innovation to abandoned theaters that hosted lively performances, the history of Detroit is etched into the walls of these dilapidated structures.

One of the most popular sites for urban exploration is the Packard Automotive Plant. Once a symbol of Detroit’s automotive dominance, this massive complex now stands in ruins, showcasing the stark contrast between its glorious past and present decay. Walking through its sprawling ruins is a mesmerizing experience, as you witness the remnants of the assembly lines, the graffiti on the walls, and the quiet echoes of a once-thriving industry.

Another intriguing building is the Michigan Central Station. Its grandeur and architectural beauty are still evident, despite years of neglect. As you explore its crumbling interiors, you can’t help but imagine the hustle and bustle of thousands of travelers passing through its halls. The abandoned ticket counters, waiting rooms, and platforms stand as a haunting reminder of the city’s transportation history.

While exploring these buildings, it’s important to remember that safety should be a top priority. Many abandoned structures are in a state of disrepair, with hazards such as unstable floors, falling debris, and broken windows. It is advisable to wear appropriate protective gear and to explore with a group or a knowledgeable guide.

Photographers also flock to these abandoned buildings to capture the beauty in decay. The contrast between the intricate architectural details and the ravages of time creates a compelling visual narrative. The peeling paint, cracked walls, and overgrown vegetation add a layer of texture and depth to the photographs, telling a story of abandonment and resilience.

Exploring the abandoned buildings of Detroit not only offers a glimpse into the city’s past but also emphasizes the importance of protecting and preserving these architectural treasures. They are a testament to the city’s history, and efforts to restore and revitalize them contribute to the ongoing revitalization of Detroit as a whole.

Now, let’s delve into the specifics of some of the most captivating abandoned buildings in Detroit, witnessing their haunting beauty and learning about their unique histories.

Building 1: [Name of the First Abandoned Building]

[Name of the First Abandoned Building], located in the heart of Detroit, stands as a stark example of the city’s architectural heritage and its struggles with abandonment. This iconic structure embodies the rise and fall of Detroit, with its faded grandeur and a haunting beauty that continues to captivate visitors and urban explorers.

The building, constructed in [year], was once a thriving [description of the building’s original purpose]. It played a significant role in the city’s [historical, cultural, or economic significance]. However, as economic challenges and population decline hit Detroit, the building fell into disrepair and was ultimately abandoned.

Despite its current state of neglect, the building still exudes a sense of faded grandeur and architectural beauty. As you venture inside, you are immediately struck by the remnants of its former glory. The ornate detailing, crumbling walls, and vestiges of its original purpose evoke a sense of nostalgia and curiosity.

Exploring the various floors and rooms, you can almost hear echoes of the past, imagining the bustling activity and vibrant life that once filled the space. The corridors, now covered in graffiti and dust, were once frequented by [description of the people who used the building]. The empty rooms, now inhabited only by debris and scraps, were once the stage for [description of the building’s past activities or events].

Photographers are particularly drawn to [Name of the First Abandoned Building] due to its captivating decay. The interplay of light and shadows, the peeling paint, and the intricate details provide a unique backdrop for capturing poignant and evocative images. The building’s haunting beauty is a testament to the passage of time and the resilience of its architectural design.

Efforts to revitalize and preserve [Name of the First Abandoned Building] have been ongoing. Community organizations, along with passionate individuals, are working tirelessly to raise awareness and secure the necessary resources for its restoration. These efforts not only aim to restore the building to its former glory but also provide an opportunity to breathe new life into the surrounding neighborhood.

Visiting [Name of the First Abandoned Building] is not only an opportunity to witness its captivating beauty but also a chance to connect with the history and soul of Detroit. It serves as a reminder of the city’s past triumphs and struggles and ignites a sense of hope for its future.

As we continue our journey through Detroit’s abandoned buildings, let’s now turn our attention to [Name of the Second Abandoned Building], another remarkable structure that stands as a testament to the city’s rich heritage.

Building 2: [Name of the Second Abandoned Building]

[Name of the Second Abandoned Building], located in [location] in Detroit, is a striking testament to the city’s architectural past and a haunting reminder of its present struggles. Once a thriving [description of the building’s original purpose], this abandoned structure now stands as a captivating and enigmatic relic of Detroit’s history.

Constructed in [year], [Name of the Second Abandoned Building] served as a [description of its original use or significance]. It played a significant role in the local community, embodying the spirit of [historical, cultural, or economic significance]. However, as economic challenges and shifting landscapes impacted Detroit, the building gradually fell into disrepair and was ultimately left abandoned.

As you step inside [Name of the Second Abandoned Building], you can’t help but be struck by the stark contrast between its decaying state and the remnants of its former grandeur. The faded colors, crumbling walls, and broken windows are a testament to the passage of time. Yet, amidst the decay, hints of its architectural beauty can still be found, begging to be admired and appreciated.

Exploring the various rooms and hallways of [Name of the Second Abandoned Building], you’ll discover remnants of its past. Each corner holds a story, providing glimpses into the daily lives and rich history of the building’s inhabitants. Perhaps you’ll stumble upon discarded artifacts, faded documents, or faded photographs, offering a window into the building’s vibrant past.

Photographers are often drawn to [Name of the Second Abandoned Building] due to the beauty found in its decay. The play of light and shadow, the textures of peeling paint and weathered surfaces, create a captivating canvas for capturing thought-provoking images. Each photograph becomes a visual dialogue between the building’s past and present, documenting its gradual transformation over time.

Efforts to preserve and revitalize [Name of the Second Abandoned Building] have gained momentum. Community organizations, local preservationists, and dedicated individuals are working tirelessly to raise awareness and funds for its restoration. Their commitment to preserving the building’s architectural and historical significance serves as a beacon of hope for Detroit’s revitalization.

Visiting [Name of the Second Abandoned Building] allows you to witness the dichotomy of Detroit’s past and present. It is an opportunity to reflect on the challenges faced by the city while embracing the potential for revitalization and the preservation of its architectural heritage.

As we continue our exploration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings, we will now turn our attention to [Name of the Third Abandoned Building], an intriguing structure that tells yet another fascinating story of the city’s past.

Building 3: [Name of the Third Abandoned Building]

[Name of the Third Abandoned Building], nestled in [location] in Detroit, is a captivating example of the city’s architectural legacy and the impact of urban decay. This remarkable structure, left abandoned and forgotten, serves as a poignant reminder of both Detroit’s illustrious past and its current challenges.

Constructed in [year], [Name of the Third Abandoned Building] was originally designed to serve as a [description of its original purpose]. At the time of its construction, it stood as a symbol of progress and prosperity in Detroit. However, as economic hardships and shifting industries plagued the city, the building fell into disuse and was ultimately abandoned.

Stepping inside [Name of the Third Abandoned Building], one is immediately struck by the eerie yet captivating aura that fills the space. The cracked walls, broken windows, and remnants of its former inhabitants all contribute to its haunting beauty. As you explore its echoing hallways and vacant rooms, it’s as if time stands still, allowing you to witness the contrasts between its faded grandeur and the encroaching decay.

The architectural details of [Name of the Third Abandoned Building] still manage to evoke a sense of awe and admiration. From intricate moldings and ornate window frames to the remnants of its once-grand entrance, these elements speak volumes about the craftsmanship and artistic vision that existed when the building was thriving.

Beneath the layers of neglect, the building holds echoes of its past occupants and the activities that once brought life to its halls. Imagining the bustling energy of [Name of the Third Abandoned Building] during its prime is both captivating and bittersweet. The remnants of machinery, forgotten artifacts, and worn signage provide a glimpse into its unique history and the stories of those who once occupied the space.

Photographers are drawn to [Name of the Third Abandoned Building] for its rich visual tapestry of decay. The interplay of light and shadow, the juxtaposition between decaying elements and the remnants of its past grandeur, present endless opportunities for capturing powerful and thought-provoking images. Each photograph becomes a testament to the building’s resilience and a reflection of the changing urban landscape.

Efforts have been made to save and repurpose [Name of the Third Abandoned Building]. Community organizations and preservation advocates recognize its cultural and historical significance, working diligently to raise awareness and secure the resources necessary for its restoration. These efforts demonstrate the ongoing commitment to preserving and celebrating Detroit’s architectural heritage.

Visiting [Name of the Third Abandoned Building] is an opportunity to witness the layers of history intertwined with the challenges faced by post-industrial cities like Detroit. It serves as a reminder of the importance of preserving these architectural treasures as tangible links to the city’s past, while also inspiring hope for a brighter future.

As our exploration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings continues, let us now turn our attention to [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building], another enchanting structure that unveils the city’s fascinating narratives.

Building 4: [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building]

[Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building], located in [location], stands as a captivating symbol of Detroit’s architectural heritage and its struggles with abandonment. This remarkable structure, now left abandoned and forgotten, carries with it a rich history and a unique story that adds to the fabric of the city.

[Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building] was constructed in [year] and was originally designed to [description of its original purpose]. In its prime, it played a significant role in the community, reflecting the aspirations and dreams of Detroit’s residents. However, as economic challenges and shifting demographics swept through the city, the building gradually fell into disrepair, eventually becoming abandoned.

Exploring [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building] unveils a world frozen in time. The decaying walls, broken windows, and remnants of its past life create an atmosphere that is both haunting and intriguing. As you venture through its crumbling corridors and vacant rooms, you can’t help but feel a connection to the building’s former existence.

The architectural details of [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building] are a testament to the craftsmanship of a bygone era. Intricate moldings, ornate ceilings, and carefully crafted cornerstones transport visitors back to a time when every detail was meticulously planned and executed. Despite the signs of decay, the building’s inherent beauty still shines through.

Throughout its abandoned spaces, whispers of the building’s history echo. Traces of its original purpose can be found, such as machinery, faded signage, or remnants of products that were once manufactured or sold within its walls. Each discovery fuels the imagination and paints a picture of the activity and vibrancy that once filled the building.

Photographers are drawn to [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building] for its captivating visual elements. The play of light and shadows, the juxtaposition of decay and remnants of the past, offer infinite opportunities for capturing compelling images. Each photograph tells a story, conveying a sense of nostalgia and a deep appreciation for the building’s unique character.

Efforts to preserve and repurpose [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building] are gaining momentum. Preservation societies, community advocates, and passionate individuals are working tirelessly to raise awareness and secure the resources needed for its restoration. Their dedication reflects a commitment to honoring Detroit’s architectural heritage and reviving neglected spaces.

Visiting [Name of the Fourth Abandoned Building] is not only a journey into the past, but also an opportunity to reflect on the challenges faced by cities like Detroit. It highlights the importance of preserving these architectural treasures, which are not only physical structures but also repositories of memories and stories that help shape the city’s identity.

Let us now turn our attention to [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building], another captivating structure that showcases Detroit’s architectural legacy and the power of preservation.

Building 5: [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building]

[Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building], located in the heart of Detroit, represents both the city’s architectural heritage and the challenges it faces with abandoned structures. This captivating building, now left to decay, holds stories of Detroit’s past and serves as a reminder of the importance of preservation.

[Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building] was constructed in [year] and originally served as a [description of its original purpose]. It played a significant role in the community, contributing to the vibrancy and culture of the city. However, as Detroit experienced economic hardships and shifting industries, the building was left neglected and ultimately abandoned.

Entering [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building], you will be greeted by a mix of awe and melancholy. The worn-out walls, shattered windows, and remnants of its former function present a visual journey through time. Each room holds a piece of the building’s history, whispering stories of the people and activities that once populated the space.

The architectural details within [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building] bear witness to the craftsmanship of a bygone era. Ornate columns, intricate moldings, and elegant facades reflect the pride that went into designing and constructing the building. Although weathered by time, these features still exude a sense of grace and beauty.

Exploring the various floors and chambers of [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building], you might come across remnants of its past life. Discarded items, vintage advertisements, and faded signs evoke a sense of nostalgia and provide glimpses into the building’s former function. Each discovery adds to the intricate tapestry of history woven within its walls.

[Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building] has also become a source of inspiration for photographers. The contrast between the decaying elements and the remains of its architectural splendor offers an opportunity for capturing evocative and thought-provoking images. The interplay of light and shadow accentuates the building’s haunting charm, while the textures and details tell a visual story of the passage of time.

Efforts to preserve and revitalize [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building] are underway. Dedicated individuals, community organizations, and preservation enthusiasts are working tirelessly to raise awareness and secure the necessary resources for its restoration. Their commitment to preserving the building’s cultural and historical significance reflects a shared appreciation for Detroit’s architectural heritage.

Visiting [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building] allows us to witness the layers of history and the challenges faced by once-proud structures in Detroit. It serves as a reminder that these abandoned buildings, despite their current state, still hold immense value and potential. The revitalization of buildings like [Name of the Fifth Abandoned Building] not only preserves a piece of Detroit’s past but also contributes to the revitalization and renewal of the city.

Now, let us proceed to explore [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building], another compelling structure that showcases the unique narratives of Detroit’s architectural landscape.

Building 6: [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building]

[Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building], situated in [location], stands as a captivating testament to the architectural history of Detroit. This abandoned structure, with its faded grandeur and haunting presence, offers a glimpse into the city’s past while reflecting the challenges faced by its neglected buildings.

Originally constructed in [year], [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building] was once a vibrant [description of its original purpose]. It played a significant role in the fabric of the community, contributing to the cultural, social, or economic identity of Detroit. However, as economic hardships and demographic shifts unfolded, the building gradually lost its purpose and succumbed to abandonment.

Entering [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building], one is immediately struck by the juxtaposition of its dilapidated state and the remnants of its former glory. The worn-out floors, peeling paint, and broken windows create an atmosphere that is both haunting and captivating. Each step through its corridors and rooms unearths hints of its past significance.

The architecture of [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building] showcases the ingenuity and craftsmanship of its time. From the intricate detailing to the grand architectural elements, the building’s design evokes a sense of awe and appreciation. Despite the passage of time, the underlying beauty of the structure can still be felt.

Exploring [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building], you may come across artifacts and remnants that offer a glimpse into its former life. Papers, furniture, or other discarded items provide clues about the people and activities that once animated the space. These remnants ignite the imagination and allow for a deeper connection with the building’s history.

Photographers are drawn to [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building] for its unique visual appeal. The contrast between decay and architectural splendor, the interplay of light and shadow, create an opportunity to capture powerful and evocative images. Each photograph captures the essence of a structure suspended in time, revealing the beauty within abandonment.

Despite its current state, [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building] has not been forgotten. Preservation initiatives, community efforts, and the dedication of individuals aiming to honor Detroit’s architectural heritage have been set in motion. The goal is to raise awareness and secure the resources necessary for the building’s restoration, preserving its historical and cultural value.

A visit to [Name of the Sixth Abandoned Building] offers a window into the past while highlighting the possibilities for rejuvenation and renewal in Detroit. It serves as a reminder of the importance of preserving architectural treasures and nurturing the spirit of restoration, ensuring that the legacy of these buildings continues to inspire future generations.

As we conclude our exploration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings, it is clear that these structures hold immense historical, architectural, and cultural significance. They stand as a testament to the city’s past, present challenges, and future potential. By honoring and preserving these buildings, Detroit can continue to celebrate its rich heritage while fostering a thriving and renewed urban landscape.

Thank you for joining us on this journey through Detroit’s abandoned buildings, where the remnants of the past intertwine with the hope for a vibrant future.

Preservation Efforts

Preservation efforts in Detroit are a testament to the city’s commitment to honoring its architectural heritage and revitalizing its abandoned buildings. These initiatives are driven by passionate individuals, community organizations, and preservation societies who recognize the value of preserving Detroit’s unique history and cultural identity.

One notable organization leading the charge is the Detroit Historic District Commission (DHDC). The DHDC works closely with property owners, architects, and community members to ensure that historically significant buildings are protected and preserved. They provide guidance on restoration projects, review permits, and enforce preservation standards to maintain the architectural integrity of Detroit’s heritage sites.

Another prominent entity is the Detroit Preservation Network (DPN), a coalition of organizations and individuals dedicated to protecting and promoting Detroit’s architectural treasures. The DPN organizes educational programs, conducts research, and advocates for the preservation of important buildings. Through their efforts, they raise awareness about the value of these structures and mobilize support for their restoration and adaptive reuse.

Private investors have also played a crucial role in preserving Detroit’s abandoned buildings. In recent years, there has been a surge in interest from developers and entrepreneurs who recognize the untapped potential of these structures. By acquiring and repurposing abandoned buildings, they breathe new life into the city, transforming them into vibrant spaces for living, working, and cultural activities.

One success story of preservation and revitalization is the renovation of the Detroit Masonic Temple. Once facing the threat of demolition, this historic landmark was saved through the efforts of community groups and private funding. The restoration process restored its stunning architecture and brought the building back to life as a venue for concerts, events, and community gatherings.

In addition to large-scale restoration projects, grassroots initiatives have emerged to preserve smaller, neighborhood-focused structures. Local neighborhood groups, like the Boston-Edison Historic District, Indian Village, and Corktown Neighborhoods, actively engage in preserving and promoting the historical integrity of their communities. Through their tireless efforts, these neighborhoods retain their unique character and architectural charm.

Preservation efforts in Detroit also extend beyond physical restoration. It involves educating the public, fostering a sense of pride in the city’s heritage, and encouraging ongoing maintenance and care of historic properties. By showcasing the stories and significance of these buildings, Detroit can inspire a renewed appreciation for its architectural treasures.

While challenges still exist, such as the high cost of restoration and limited resources, the preservation movement in Detroit continues to gain momentum. The collaborative efforts of individuals, organizations, and government entities are instrumental in ensuring the survival and revival of the city’s abandoned buildings.

By preserving these architectural gems, Detroit not only safeguards its past but also cultivates a more vibrant and sustainable future. The restored buildings contribute to economic revitalization, attract tourism, and serve as iconic landmarks that celebrate the city’s rich heritage. Through these ongoing preservation efforts, Detroit embraces its architectural legacy and reclaims its place as a city of enduring beauty and historic significance.

As we conclude our exploration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings, we leave with a sense of hope and optimism, knowing that the dedication to preservation will continue to shape the future of the city.

Thank you for joining us on this journey through Detroit’s abandoned buildings and the preservation efforts that are working towards a brighter future.

The abandoned buildings of Detroit hold a captivating allure, symbolizing the city’s rich history, challenges, and potential for revitalization. These structures, with their faded grandeur and haunting beauty, serve as tangible reminders of the rise and fall of Detroit’s industrial prowess. Exploring these buildings allows us to witness the layers of history and the profound impact that economic decline and societal shifts have had on the city.

From magnificent theaters that once hosted legendary performances to abandoned factories that were once at the forefront of innovation, each building tells a story of Detroit’s past. The architectural details, remnants of past activities, and interplay of light and shadow evoke a sense of awe and nostalgia, connecting us to the city’s vibrant history.

Preservation efforts in Detroit demonstrate a shared dedication to safeguarding and revitalizing these architectural treasures. Organizations, preservation societies, and community initiatives work tirelessly to raise awareness, secure funding, and find creative solutions for restoration and adaptive reuse. The commitment to preserving these buildings not only honors Detroit’s past but also contributes to the city’s ongoing revitalization.

By repurposing abandoned buildings, Detroit has the opportunity to breathe new life into these spaces. Through renovations, these structures can once again become vibrant hubs of creativity, commerce, and community engagement. The preservation and adaptive reuse of these buildings are essential steps toward a more thriving and sustainable urban landscape.

Exploring the abandoned buildings of Detroit is not just about admiring their beauty in decay, but also about reflecting on the broader narrative of urban transformation, economic cycles, and the resilience of communities. These buildings remind us of the vital role that architecture plays in our collective memory and the importance of preserving our cultural heritage.

As we conclude our journey through Detroit’s abandoned buildings, we partake in a renewed sense of hope for the city. Detroit’s architectural legacy stands as a testament to its history, creativity, and strength. Through preservation efforts, Detroit can preserve its past while shaping a vibrant future, where these buildings can inspire and serve as anchors for community revitalization.

Embracing the beauty, challenges, and potential of Detroit’s abandoned buildings encourages us to appreciate the layers of history, to honor the perseverance of the community, and to envision a future where the city thrives once again. As the city continues its journey of revitalization, these abandoned buildings serve as poignant reminders that the story of Detroit is far from over.

Thank you for joining us on this exploration through Detroit’s abandoned buildings, where the echoes of the past intertwine with the aspirations for a vibrant and resilient future.

TouristSecrets

  • Privacy Overview
  • Strictly Necessary Cookies

This website uses cookies so that we can provide you with the best user experience possible. Cookie information is stored in your browser and performs functions such as recognising you when you return to our website and helping our team to understand which sections of the website you find most interesting and useful.

Strictly Necessary Cookie should be enabled at all times so that we can save your preferences for cookie settings.

If you disable this cookie, we will not be able to save your preferences. This means that every time you visit this website you will need to enable or disable cookies again.

abandoned detroit tour

7 Incredible Abandoned Buildings In Detroit

Want to check out some of the cool abandoned building around Detroit? Here's a few different locations you may want to check out!

Secret Detroit

Have you ever heard of urban exploring? It’s a subculture of people who love exploring old, abandoned buildings. Why is this even popular? Well, there are a lot of urban explorers who are interested in the historical significance of old buildings. Others are all about documenting what they find. Though a few of the properties on this list are perfectly legal to check out, others were just too interesting not to include. Explore them with caution or research from afar!

Grande Ballroom

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Matt Gabs (@mattgabsguitar)

This boarded-up building on Grand River Ave has an impressive nightlife legacy spanning almost half a century. Designed in 1928 by Detroit architect Charles N. Agree in an Art Deco style, the building was originally a jazz dancehall with a unique “floating” floor that raised revelers up on springs, giving the illusion of weightlessness. In the 1950s, the jazz ensembles gave way to bands as the Grande Ballroom became a dance club. This era was less successful, in part due to its alcohol-free policy, and the club was turned into a roller-skating rink and temporarily, to a storage facility. In 1966, the Grande Ballroom reopened as a rock venue, and quickly became a standby of the local psychedelic and garage rock scene. It played host to iconic acts like the Velvet Underground and Pink Floyd alongside local up-and-comers until its final closure in 1972. In the years since, the building has fallen into disrepair, though intrepid explorers continued to sneak in to see its iconic dancefloor. Today, it’s near-impossible to get in, but fascinating to witness knowing the history the building has witnessed.

Find it at 8952 Grand River, Detroit, MI 48204.

Abundant Life Christian Center

Just over a half mile away from the Grande Ballroom, the Abundant Life Christian Center also dates back to the early 1900s. Dedicated in 1918, it was once the Calvary Presbyterian Church. Throughout the 20th century, attendance dwindled due to changing neighborhood demographics and Calvary Presbyterian moved out of the building. Just before the turn of the century, the building was converted to the Abundant Life Christian Center and later, The Greater Faith for Deliverance Church. In 2009, a fire swept through the building and it was left abandoned. Since then, explorers have taken the pews and stained glass, only the shell of the former church. As of Feburary 2021, the building appears to be accessible , but proceed with caution.

Find it at 8240 Grand River Ave, Detroit, MI 48204.

Packard Automotive Plant

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Joe (@photosbyjoeyd)

This abandoned automotive plant is noteworthy based on sheer size: it’s one of the largest abandoned buildings in the world, spanning over 40 acres. Between 1903 and 1911, it was a cutting-edge auto production facility, and it remains a relic of the automotive industry that earned Detroit the Motor City nickname. Designed by the iconic Detroit architect Albert Kahn, it also epitomizes the industrial architecture of the time. In the years since, it’s become a popular photoshoot spot for urban explorers. There are also plans in the works for the property to be revamped as a mixed use development, though a timeline on these plans has yet to be released.

Find it at 5815 Concord St, Detroit, MI 48211.

St. Agnes Church and School

View this post on Instagram A post shared by MEGAN IRIS ACREE (@irisacree)

At the time this stately Gothic church was being built, there were barely any other houses in the area. However, the bishop John Foley, who let the Detroit Catholic Archdiocese, knew the city well and predicted its growth. When the church opened in 1924, the area had become densely populated. In its heyday, the church had an impressive parish and Catholic girl’s school attached to it. However, a police raid on a drinking establishment in the area incited years of civil unrest that left much of the neighborhood burned. Attendance numbers at the church fell and the building was put up for sale, but never sold. As the building stood abandoned, prospecting explorers disassembled the organ and took many of the church’s decorations. What remains stands as a bittersweet and haunting reminder of the community the church once fostered and the ever-changing character of its neighborhood.

Find it at LaSalle Gardens & Rosa Parks Blvd, Detroit, MI 48206.

Giant Cow Head

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Fernández Holley (@fdholley2016)

Though this abandoned ice cream shop isn’t quite the architectural marvel like some of the other buildings on this list, it has one defining feature: the giant cow head that surveys the landscape from its roof. The small building below was once the Ira Wilson & Sons Dairy building. It got a little TLC with a fresh coat of paint when was featured in the movie 8 Mile, but has remained abandoned and for sale since.

Find it at 13099 Mack Ave, Detroit, MI 48215.

Michigan Theatre

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Kyle Dill (@kylemdill)

This one isn’t quite abandoned — in fact, it’s now an incredibly beautiful parking lot. When the Michigan Theatre first opened in 1926, Detroit was at the height of its industrial heyday. The impressive 4,000 seat theatre became a downtown movie-going institution. When the television entered people’s homes, the theatre struggled to compete and finally closed in 1967. After the initial closure, it temporarily served as a supper club, concert venue, and porn cinema before ultimately being abandoned in 1975. While investigating the building for eventual demolition, workers determined that the adjacent tower was structurally dependent on the Michigan Theatre building and alternate plans had to be made. The building’s shell was turned into a parking garage, which still reveals fragments of its former glory to those who park inside.

Find it (and park there) at 238 Bagley St, Detroit, MI 48226.

Vanity Ballroom

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Brian Zabowski (@brianzphotography)

Much like the Grande Ballroom, the Vanity Ballroom was a popular music venue throughout the twentieth century. Opened in 1929, it had a vast 5,000 square-foot dance floor that once played host to Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman. Most notably, the unique interior featured Aztec-inspired decorations in a warm southwestern color palette. It briefly closed between 1958 and 1964, after which it became a garage-rock venue and later, a Caribbean-themed club. The Vanity Ballroom is now on the National Register of Historic Places, but nevertheless has had its share of scavengers. However, the site is not entirely abandoned: realtor Leroy Burgess currently owns the building and has expressed interest in restoring it.

Find it at 1024 Newport St, Detroit, MI 48215.

abandoned detroit tour

TYPE IN YOUR SEARCH AND PRESS ENTER

FREAKTOGRAPHY

Abandoned Detroit

a church in abandoned detroit

A trip to visit Abandoned Detroit is one that every Urban Explorer or adventurous photographer should experience at least once.

Detroit, the city that was once one of the most prosperous and fastest growing cities in the United States is now a shell of its former self.

Abandoned Churches, Abandoned High Schools, Abandoned Hospitals, theaters, houses and luxury hotels.

My first trip to Detroit was in April 2014 when I experienced a whirlwind day where we visited a cathedral, a former theater, a concert hall, a luxury hotel a recently abandoned church and a high school.  I returned in March 2015 and visited an abandoned  automotive factory, two abandoned churches and a high school, then again in May 2016 to visit more churches, high schools, houses and more.

Wikipedia states :

The city of Detroit, in the U.S. state of Michigan, has gone through a major economic and demographic decline in recent decades. The population of the city has fallen from a high of 1,850,000 in 1950 to 677,116 in 2015, kicking it off the top 20 of US cities by population for the first time since 1850.

However, the city has a combined statistical area of 5,318,744 people, which currently ranks 12th in the United States. Local crime rates are among the highest in the United States (despite this, the overall crime rate in the city has seen a decline during the 21st century, and vast areas of the city are in a state of severe urban decay.

In 2013, Detroit filed the largest municipal bankruptcy case in U.S. history, which it successfully exited on December 10, 2014. Poverty, crime, and urban blight in Detroit continue to be ongoing problems. Nonetheless, poverty is improving; median household income is rising, criminal activity is decreasing by 5% annually,and the city’s blight removal project is making progress in ridding the city of all abandoned homes that cannot be rehabilitated.

2014 Detroit Urban Exploration Trip

Abandoned Detroit

2015 Detroit Urban Exploration Trip

Urban Exploring and Abandoned Photography by Freaktography, Urban Exploring Photography enthusiast from Ontario Canada

2016 Detroit Urban Exploration Trip

An Abandoned House in Detroit Michigan, Photography, URBAN EXPLORATION, abandoned, abandoned house in detroit, abandoned photography, abandoned places, creepy, decay, derelict, detroit, detroit abandoned house, freaktography, haunted, haunted places, urban exploration photography, urban explorer, urban exploring

2018 Detroit Urban Exploration Trip

Photography, URBAN EXPLORATION, abandoned, abandoned detroit, abandoned detroit cathedral, abandoned detroit church, abandoned detroit michigan, abandoned detrout school, abandoned photography, abandoned places, creepy, decay, derelict, detroit, detroit abandoned, freaktography, haunted, haunted places, urban exploration photography, urban explorer, urban exploring

5 thoughts on “Abandoned Detroit”

' src=

What beautiful architecture. How sad and tragic that it has fallen into disrepair. I am an amature photographer. I find old buildings and architecture fascinating. I live in WA state and found an old church and cemetary that is abandoned. The cemetary is on the historical registry but I can’t find anything on the church. Would you have any advice as to how to find more information about it. Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you Karen

' src=

i lived in canada and those thing dosent exist here,its a modern tragedy that hit a city liked detroit,i hoped that the good lord would blrssed the people of detroit.today nobody is responsible for this huge mess.sad and tragic.

' src=

I would Love to save one of these place if I had the money too.

' src=

It looks like Detroit was hit by an asteroid or atom bomb.

' src=

I would love to have a organized tour.? ?

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Uncovering 10 Interesting Abandoned Buildings In Detroit

These detroit abandoned buildings are perfect for urbex.

Photo of Husein Gradasevic

Since the 1960s the city of Detroit, Michigan has gone through a huge demographic and economic decline in recent decades.

With much of the steel and automotive industries in Detroit closing down, many residents were forced to move away to find better-paying jobs.

In the wake of the population decline, thousands of abandoned buildings in Detroit have been left behind to be reclaimed by nature.

Urban explorers from all over the world routinely visit our city to explore its famous abandoned buildings. Some take urbex tours , most prefer to do the exploring themselves.

If you were to visit the outskirts of Detroit you’d find nothing but decaying factories, deserted churches, and long-forgotten hospitals all of which still stand tall and mighty despite their crumbling exteriors.

If you’re an urban explorer or photographer in the Detroit area looking for abandoned places near you to explore, in this article I’ll share with you a handful of explore-worthy abandoned buildings that should be on your radar.

Best Abandoned Buildings in Detroit

1. st agnes church.

abandoned church in detroit

This long-standing Catholic church, located at 7601 Rosa Parks Blvd,  was once a place of worship for thousands of families in Detroit.

At its peak, the church had 3 priests, 22 nuns, and over 150 students in the school adjacent to the church. For over 50 years St Agnes church flourished successfully, but things would change for the worse.

A police raid that took place in an after-hours establishment that was close to the church went wrong. The tension between the police and the locals grew into mass civil unrest.

Most of the buildings near the church were burned and badly destroyed. Remarkably, St Agnes church went relatively unharmed, but the community did not fully recover.

By 1985, the church saw less than 150 families attending worship at the church. The decline in attendants and the high cost of operations is what lead to its eventual closure.

In the 90s the church was set to be sold but the deal went to hell and the church was never sold. Since then it’s been sitting completely empty and forgotten. Vandals have stripped the church of any valuables.

2. Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church

abandoned church in Detroit

The origins of the Woodward Ave Presbyterian Church can be traced back all the way to 1907.

The church had a very modest beginning. A group of residents would meet in the basement of the home of a prominent member of the neighborhood.

After a while, the group started floating the idea of starting a church to serve the growing Presbyterian families moving into the area. A wealthy member donated a parcel of land to build the church on.

In 1911 what rose along Woodward Avenue was considered at the time a masterpiece of modern English Gothic design.

The church was designed with 2 square towers overseeing a gabled entrance carved in beautiful stone. Custom stained glass and precious stones were placed all over the church.

The church was constructed for a total of $100,00 ($2.6 million in today’s currency). At its height, the Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church served as a place of worship for well over 1,000 families.

It included many different recreational and educational facilities such as a school wing where young students would meet.

In the late 70, membership at the church would reach its lowest in years. Attempts to save the church from closing down were made but in the end, were unsuccessful.

In 1993, the last reverend would step down and retired leaving the church with no leader. Since the 90s the Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church would be abandoned.

Attempts to demolish it have been made but constant delays and high costs have stagnated any demolition plans. This church is on many explorers’ lists of abandoned places in Detroit to visit.

3. Detroit Children’s Zoo / Belle Isle Zoo

For many years the zoo attracted thousands of attendants from all over the country. It housed tens of different animals both rare and common.

Monkeys, snakes, bears, tigers, and its most noteworthy was the herd of fallow deer that were native to the area but endangered.

In the 1980s Detroit’s Children’s Zoo went through an architectural theme change to bring in more visitors. The change failed and the zoo slowly fell victim to corruption and economic woes.

When it closed, the animals were shipped to different zoo’s all over the country. Most ended up in Indiana , but some made it as far as Washington. With time, the zoo was left empty and has been slowly being reclaimed by nature.

Attempts to revive the zoo were made in 2004, but the plans were scrapped and funds instead went to build an entirely new zoo.

4. Detroit Public School Book Depository

Detroit urbex

If you’re looking to do some urban exploration Detroit has many amazing places, like this one. Before the Detroit public school district took over the building, the book depository was a warehouse used by the post office.

In the mid-1900s the main post office was moved to a different more spacious building.

The Detroit public school district moved into the building to use it as a warehouse to store books and employee/student records.

In March of 1987, the depository building caught fire due to a possible arsonist. The fire caused millions of dollars in damage to school supplies and appliances.

Employees of the depository were forced to move into a new building until the depository was fixed, but that never happened.

In 2009 the building gained a bad reputation when a dead body was found in a flooded elevator shaft nearly covered in ice.

Local urban explorers, photographers, and graffiti artists have ventured into the building for years. Attempts to renovate have been made but are ongoing. Likely to never see any change.

Today it sits as one of the coolest abandoned places in Detroit to explore.

5. Trenton McLouth Steel Plant

famous abandoned detroit buildings

As Detroit’s automobile production began ramping up in the early 1900s, the need for locally produced steel led to the creation of the Trenton Mclouth Steel Plant.

Owned and operated by Donald B. McLouth, a serial steel mill owner in the Detroit area.

The Trenton McLouth plant, located at 1491 W Jefferson Trenton MI 48183 , would go on to provide an uninterrupted supply of steel for Detroit’s growing automotive companies.

Several upgrades were made to the plant to expand capacity over the years. By 1962, McLouth employed over 3,000 workers but steel demand was on a steady decline.

The decline in steel demand and the fact that steel production is a dirty process that was damaging its environment led to its downfall.

By 1982 a wave of steel plants closing rolled through the area of Detroit. In 1995 McLouth steel plant would file for bankruptcy after years of profit loss and the high cost of maintenance.

The McLouth Steel Plant has been completely empty for nearly 2 decades. Most of its heavy machinery was removed before closing.

6. American Motors Corporation Headquarters

Abandoned AMC Headquarter building

Here is another famous abandoned building Detroit is home to. Built in 1927, the 1.5 million-square-foot building started its life as a Kelvinator appliance factory.

The building was used to manufacture commercially available household refrigeration systems. During WW2 the factory was tasked with building helicopters for the army.

Over 250 helicopters were finished at the plant and also tested in a small airfield outback. The American Motors Company took possession of the factory in 1954.

AMC began to handle many different product lines from companies it had acquired. By 1960 AMC was producing and selling an estimated half a million cars per year from this factory.

In the early 1970s, AMC announced they would be moving operations to a new facility. This left thousands of workers unemployed and thousands more left the city due to rampant unemployment in the area.

It was sold in 2010 to a private businessman, Terry Williams, that was then arrested in 2012 for running an illegal automotive chop shop.

The building was seized by the government and has remained empty and abandoned since.

Today, the former AMC headquarters stands tall and mighty, a crumbling beacon of when Detroit was the main source of the US automotive industry.

7. The Brester-Wheeler Recreation Center

abandoned detroit building

The Brewster-Wheeler Recreation Center got its start as a public library in its early days. Today it is one of the key abandoned buildings in Detroit to explore.

The library was opened in 1913 to serve impoverished children and adults in the slum immigrant neighborhoods outside of downtown.

The patronage at the library never reached expected levels and in May of 1928, the 11-year-old library was put up for sale.

On October 28th, 1929 the library was converted into an auditorium with seating and a stage for live performances.

It was renamed the Brewster-Wheeler Recreation Center and ran several rec programs including billiards, boxing, track, tennis, drama, dancing, and music classes.

World-famous boxer, Joe Louis, would get his early training in this very same center. In the 1930s, the area around the community center would see significant changes.

Federally funded housing projects for poor citizens would be built all around the center. Lack of maintenance and policing by the city officials would result in a decline in quality of life throughout the projects.

An increase in crime, drug use, and prostitution in the area would displace many residents.

Keeping the Brewster-Wheeler Center open was a challenge as the center relied on donations from its alumni to stay open.

Budget cuts year after year from the city and the low attendance is what would ultimately cause the center to close its doors in 2006. Since its closure, the center has been stripped of any valuables it contained.

Graffiti taggers have covered almost every inch of the building and several small fires would destroy parts of the upper floor of the building. The future of the Brewster-Wheeler is uncertain.

8. Fisher Body Plant 21

forgotten fisher factory in urbex

The Fisher Body Plant 21, located at 6051 Hastings St, Detroit, MI , was built in 1919 on Piquette Street in Detroit to meet the growing demands of the auto industry.

The plant served to turn out Buick and Cadillac bodies and focused on the stamping process of the build.

By 1920 Fisher was producing so many high-quality automotive body parts for several car companies including Cadillac, Ford, Hudson, and other big names.

A series of violent worker strikes would take place in the 1930s but things would calm down as the worker’s demands were met.

Like many automotive companies during the second world war, Fisher Body Plant 21 would stop producing auto body parts and instead focus on manufacturing components for planes, anti-aircraft guns, tanks, and many other materials.

After WW2, the plant would go back to stamping and assembling parts for buses and limousines. In 1982 General Motors announced it would close Fisher Body Plant 21 and move production to a new plant in Flint .

The plant was abandoned in 1984 but reopened in 1990 as an industrial painting factory. That didn’t last long as in 1993 the new owners filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the plant for good.

In 2008 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began remediation work and removed several hazardous materials from the plant.

Asbestos, lead waste, cyanide, and thallium were all materials found and removed from the plant. If you decided to explore this plant, remember to wear a mask !

9. Northville Psychiatric Hospital

abandoned hospital in detroit

In the early 1940s, Michigan’s network of mental health hospitals was extremely overcrowded and inadequate.

A new mental hospital was needed to serve the needs of the mentally ill patients in the area.

An existing hospital for the ‘feeble children’ was taken over and renovated to serve as the new Northville Psychiatric Hospital for the mentally ill in 208 Lakewood St, Detroit, MI 48215.

The NSH consisted of 20 buildings in total. In its time it was lauded as one of the best psychiatric facilities in the country when it opened.

Patients suffering from varying degrees of mental illnesses would be treated in this hospital. The NHS itself was mostly self-sufficient.

It has its own kitchen, laundry, gym, movie theaters, swimming pool, and even a bowling alley.

All of the hospitals were also powered by a steam plant that supplied electricity and heat through a network of underground tunnels.

In the early days of Northville , doctors would pioneer the use of art and music as a way to treat ill patients. Patients would learn to play musical instruments, act in theater plays, study mechanics, economics, etc.

Due to budget cuts and severe overcrowding at Northville, doctors would begin relying more on drugs and sedatives to treat patients.

Northville Psychiatric Hospital was built to house 650 patients at a time. At its peak, over 1200 patients were living here. The Detroit News channel would call living conditions at the hospital ‘Appaling’ and ‘Sad’.

Some patients had to sleep in the halls and gym as rooms were not available. Assault, theft, racism, neglect, and rape were all common among the patients. several patients died while being treated at this hospital.

In 2003 the Northville hospital was finally closed. Two of the buildings were demolished but several still stand to this day.

Fences have been placed all around the property but that hasn’t deterred explorers from having a look inside. Today, the Northville Hospital is among some of the most popular abandoned buildings in Detroit to explore.

10. Continental Motors / Aluminum Plant

abandoned factory in detroit

The Continental Motors company began when founding engineer, Ross Judson, invented a 2-cylinder engine.

As the engine grew in popularity, a second plant was constructed to cater to growing demand. A new plant was constructed along Jefferson Avenue on the east side of Detroit in 1911.

This new plant had the capacity to produce 20-22,000 thousand engines per year. For years Continental Motors dominated the automobile engine market supply.

They supplied motors to over 120 different manufacturers in Detroit alone. In 1930 the Continental Motors plant began producing aircraft engines and quickly became a major supplier for small aircraft manufacturers.

The Great Depression nearly wiped them out of business but they managed to stay afloat until the second world war came along.

In 1939, the plant stopped producing auto engines and instead worked on tank engines to supply the army. In order to test the tank engines, Continental Motors company decided to build a testing room on the north side of the plant.

Control rooms with blast-proof glass and super thick concrete rooms allowed the engineers to test the tank engines at full power.

In the post-war years, Continental Motors would see a drastic decline in engine demand. The company was sold in 1951 and it ran for 10 years before finally closing down. Parts of the plant have been demolished but still stand to this day.

Explore These Abandoned Buildings in Detroit Before They’re Gone

Whether you’re a photographer or an urban explorer, the many abandoned buildings Detroit has to offer will not disappoint.

The long history of economic hardships in Detroit ended with millions of residents fleeing the area and leaving thousands of abandoned buildings behind. Today some places in Detroit have become no-go zones with hundreds of houses and buildings left behind and deserted.

For many years, urban explorers have ventured into the famous city of Detroit to marvel at its decaying beauty. The owners of detroiturbex.com are some of them. For more abandoned buildings in Detroit, be sure to check them out.

Related Posts:

  • These Abandoned Places In Maryland All Have An…
  • Uncovering The Coolest Abandoned Places In Alabama
  • Uncovering Some of the Coolest Abandoned Places in Orlando
  • Uncovering Some of the Coolest Abandoned Places In Tampa, FL
  • 7 Types of People You're Likely To Encounter Inside…
  • Is It Illegal To Enter Abandoned Buildings?

facebook pixel

A Visual Tour Through Detroit's Historical Ruins

abandoned detroit tour

Detroit, the famous Motor City, has experienced one of the most significant declines in population and industry across America. Between 2000 and 2010, the city lost 25% of its population, with its ranking dropping from the 10th down to the 18th largest city in the USA. In spite of this turbulent time for the city, Detroit is home to a wealth of history and culture that deserves to be seen. The Culture Trip celebrates the city’s forgotten spots. With its initial expansion and following decline, a big part of Detroit’s infrastructure remains unused, making some areas of the city real ghost spots. But far from being eerie, this presents an opportunity to encounter unexpected gems around almost every corner.

Woodward presbyterian church.

Woodward Presbyterian Church is one of Detroit ‘s most beautiful abandoned gems. Its impressive English-Gothic style architecture dating back to early 20th century gives it a unique identity. The site has been abandoned since 2010, but renovation work started in 2014, so this grandiose church might soon be restored to its former glory.

abandoned detroit tour

Michigan’s National Theatre

abandoned detroit tour

Woods Cathedral Church

Woods Cathedral Church first opened as Visitation Catholic Church in 1925, and after closing in 1989 after financial difficulties, it re-opened as Woods Cathedral Church of God in Christ. After only 16 years in operation, it closed down again in 2005. The church was sold to a developer, and 11 years afterwards, is still abandoned with secured entry.

people cheering on a mountain

Become a Culture Tripper!

Sign up to our newsletter to save up to 500$ on our unique trips..

See privacy policy .

abandoned detroit tour

KEEN TO EXPLORE THE WORLD?

Connect with like-minded people on our premium trips curated by local insiders and with care for the world

Since you are here, we would like to share our vision for the future of travel - and the direction Culture Trip is moving in.

Culture Trip launched in 2011 with a simple yet passionate mission: to inspire people to go beyond their boundaries and experience what makes a place, its people and its culture special and meaningful — and this is still in our DNA today. We are proud that, for more than a decade, millions like you have trusted our award-winning recommendations by people who deeply understand what makes certain places and communities so special.

Increasingly we believe the world needs more meaningful, real-life connections between curious travellers keen to explore the world in a more responsible way. That is why we have intensively curated a collection of premium small-group trips as an invitation to meet and connect with new, like-minded people for once-in-a-lifetime experiences in three categories: Culture Trips, Rail Trips and Private Trips. Our Trips are suitable for both solo travelers, couples and friends who want to explore the world together.

Culture Trips are deeply immersive 5 to 16 days itineraries, that combine authentic local experiences, exciting activities and 4-5* accommodation to look forward to at the end of each day. Our Rail Trips are our most planet-friendly itineraries that invite you to take the scenic route, relax whilst getting under the skin of a destination. Our Private Trips are fully tailored itineraries, curated by our Travel Experts specifically for you, your friends or your family.

We know that many of you worry about the environmental impact of travel and are looking for ways of expanding horizons in ways that do minimal harm - and may even bring benefits. We are committed to go as far as possible in curating our trips with care for the planet. That is why all of our trips are flightless in destination, fully carbon offset - and we have ambitious plans to be net zero in the very near future.

abandoned detroit tour

See & Do

Gift the joy of travel this christmas with culture trip gift cards.

abandoned detroit tour

Guides & Tips

The benefits of booking a private tour with culture trip.

abandoned detroit tour

Everything You Need to Know About Booking a Private Culture Trip

abandoned detroit tour

How to Book a Private Tour with Culture Trip

abandoned detroit tour

How to Make the Most of Your Holiday Time if You're in the US

abandoned detroit tour

Travel With Culture Trip: Who Are Our Local Insiders?

abandoned detroit tour

The Best Solo Travel Tours in the US

abandoned detroit tour

5 Ski Resort Scenes You Can't Miss This Year

abandoned detroit tour

Travel in America: Top 5 Trip Ideas

abandoned detroit tour

The Best Couples Retreats in the USA

abandoned detroit tour

Top TRIPS by Culture Trip for Ticking Off Your Bucket List

abandoned detroit tour

Top Trips for Embracing Your Own Backyard

Culture trip spring sale, save up to $1,100 on our unique small-group trips limited spots..

abandoned detroit tour

  • Post ID: 597934
  • Sponsored? No
  • View Payload

urban exploration abandoned buildings detroit

abandoned detroit tour

Why Detroit

What happened to the city of Detroit?

Locations

Explore Locations

Abandoned buildings in and around Detroit.

Featured content

Featured Content

Detroit: Now and Then, an interactive look at the history of Detroit.

Facebook Share

Detroit Buildings

Detroit Buildings – Touring The Abandoned Ones

Detroit Buildings. What comes to mind? Eminem’s childhood home, the GM Renaissance Center, The Detroit Tigers Stadium? Perhaps it’s all and more. For me, it is the historic and abandoned buildings. The architectural marvels now lay in ruin, covered in graffiti, a shamble of their original glory.

We spent a long weekend in Detroit touring the abandoned buildings. As much as we like to explore on our own, I wanted to take a local tour because some of the buildings we wanted to view are in less than desirable locations; secondly, we are not experienced, urban explorers.

Detroit Buildings

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read our  disclosure and privacy policy  for more information.

Researching our options, I came across hundreds of photos by Jesse Welter, a local photographer fascinated with urbexing and Detroit’s architecture. I found Jesse’s website Motor City Photo Workshops , and realized that he offered tours. I don’t think you can do any better than take a trip like this with a local photographer that shares your passion. Four of us did this tour, which cost $75 a person and was one of the best seventy-five dollars ever spent.

Sadly, Jesse no longer offers the tour however, I will share alternative options below.

We did this tour before I had a blog. Sharing this experience has been on my to-do list for a while. I was recently re-motivated to write this after reading one of my favorite bloggers’ posts: A Work of Street Art: The Best Murals in Nashville . The murals reminded me of Detroit’s graffiti, which, while not the same, are both urban art forms.

Tour Companies Offering Tours of Detroit Buildings

Where to stay in detroit.

Dee Dee Martel and I took all the photographs for this post.

Michigan Central Station

An iconic train station, also known as Michigan Central Depot or MCS, was the tallest of all rail stations when it was constructed in 1913. This station was once a showpiece over the top marble floors, with galore bronze chandeliers and Corinthian columns. A masterpiece is worthy of comparison to Central Station in New York . You may recognize this station. It’s been featured in many films , and Eminem has shot Eminem shot music videos here as well. As rail travel began to decline, this station ultimately closed in 1998.

Detroit Buildings

Over the years, there has been much speculation about what would happen to Michigan Central Station. There was talk of an event venue, a shopping mall, and office buildings. On June 19 th, 2018, Ford Motor Company announced its long-rumored plan to buy the abandoned Michigan Central Station.

We could not enter the station, but you could still marvel at the beauty from the outside.

East Town Theater

This was a favorite for me; sadly, it can only be enjoyed through memories and photos. It was Demolished in Nov 2015.

Upon arrival, we were met by the local prostitute and the local crack head who was riding a toddler ‘s bike. Yes, a toddler’s bike! Both out and about enjoying the morning at 8 am. Visualize the scene in Friday where the oversized De Bo is riding Red’s bike. Now you have an idea of what this was like!

Detroit Buildings

The prostitute followed us all over, harmlessly sharing her version of the history of the theater while asking to be tipped. This quickly turned into full-on begging, which became annoying. She was shooed away and eventually left us to our exploration.

The Eastown Theatre opened in 1931, initially as a movie theater. It was converted to a rock venue in 1967, hosting some big names like Fleetwood Mac. In the ’90s, like many other Detroit Buildings, this one hosted some raves in the 90s. In 2010, most of the building was destroyed by a fire. The once fantastic dome ceiling is gone forever, traces remaining in crumbles below.

St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church

This church is an urban explorer’s dream! It’s got all the cliché elements. An old decrepit grand piano is staged on its side to create drama. For that perfect shot, random plastic flowers laid throughout, shoes and flowers aesthetically. Bibles galore and plenty of paperwork (including checks) give you a glimpse into its past. This church has been photographed many times, the grand piano’s main focal piece.

Detroit Buildings

Packard Automotive Plant

The graffiti lover’s paradise, this place is packed with graffiti, and some of it is very entertaining.  Though forewarning, this place is also full of vagrants, human feces, and urine, so watch your step!

Packard Automotive Plant occupies a whopping 3,500,000-square-foot on 40 acres. It was the heart of the automobile industry boom. Opening in 1903 and closing in 1958. During its abandonment, it’s been used for paintball, raves, scrapping, and shelter. In 2017, Arte Express began renovations.

Detroit Buildings

Crockett Technical High School

This one is exciting and sad. I say it’s unfortunate because it’s humongous, yet there is no sign of life. On several occasions, homes appear to be occupied, but otherwise, this area is like a no man’s land – totally deserted. At least it was when we toured it. This school is massive! During its heyday, it had 2,300 students, which was above the intended capacity.

If you get the chance to tour this school, a couple of things will resonate. The sheer size and desertion give your insight into what was. Imagine how many had to have lived in this area for a school of this size. Imagine if you can why they left. If you are unfamiliar with the city of Detroit’s struggle, now would be a good time to read about it.

Essentially, in 2013 Detroit became the city ever to  file for bankruptcy . This did not happen overnight nor in the 21st century. The demise started around 1950 with the decentralization of the auto industry and moving away from the city to the suburbs. From there, a trickle-down financial effect followed. This is a tremendously simplified summary. Many other factors contributed to a more profound decline, including government fraud, racism, and poor management of the city.

Detroit Buildings

Fisher Body Plant 21

Visiting this plant was a bonus! It was not on our original tour, nor had we heard of this particular plant. Much like the Packard Automotive Plant, this is a big plant but a fraction of the size. If you attempt this one, know there is a ton of staircase climbing. I can’t recall exactly how many flights, but after around about 16, everyone in our group except Brian quit. Much as we would have enjoyed the views from the roof, we were knackered!

The Fisher Body Plant was built in 1919 and is a whopping 3,700,000 square feet of floor space. This plant has got tons of original tracks in it. Well, it did when we toured it, and it still has the equipment, such as a floor cleaner!

Detroit Buildings

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality studied the Fisher Body Plant in 2004. The study found the plant full of hazards such as asbestos, lead waste, and other contaminants. So, if you do this one – I did tell you!

The problem is more related to the economic downturn in Southeast Michigan and the loss of good-paying jobs, which means low-class families aren’t able to afford the mortgages and taxes, so it’s cheaper to walk away from the structure than to keep it. 

Yes, hundreds of abandoned factories and warehouses dot the Motor City.

Originally known as the Chamber of Commerce Building, the steel-framed United Way Community Services Building (1895) at 1212 Griswold is Detroit’s oldest skyscraper.

Yes, redevelopment at Detroit’s former Hudson’s store is in progress. Bedrock broke ground for development in 2017. More than 10,200 tons of steel and 11,600 beams were used to create structural support for the building’s foundation, which is supported by 130-foot caissons.

In 2023, the Tower will reach its final height of 685 feet, making it the second tallest building in Detroit and the State of Michigan.

Closing Thoughts

I loved our time in Detroit and want to explore it again. There is an endless amount of buildings to explore, and several neighborhoods are making a comeback. For example, visit the mansions at Brush Park or Indian Village. Watch a basketball game. I went to the Ford Automobile, which was terrific. I was shocked at how fascinating this tour was. Or, go to Greenfield Village. Most importantly, if you visit, explore Detroit’s abandoned buildings. Lastly, don’t tour solo – here is a local to ensure you are safe.

Looking for more posts on buildings? Start here:

  • Ca’ d”ad’Zanhe Ringling Museum And Mansion
  • Inside Hohenschwangau Castle – The Mad Kings Childhood Home
  • Inside Neuschwanstein Castle – GermGermany’srytale Castle
  • Linderhof Palace – King LudwLudwig’sntry Retreat
  • The Breakers, Rhode Island
  • The Howey Mansion – Howey-in-the-Hills, Florida
  • Why You Should Visit Liechtenstein’s Castles

We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Share with others!

abandoned detroit tour

Nikki Webster is a travel writer who covers how to travel while grinding a day job without breaking the bank. Nikki is always in search of off-the-beaten-track experiences and unique stays. She is particularly fond of Florida and writes extensively about the state. She flies around 60,000 miles annually and has visited 74 countries, 50 states, and six continents. You can read all about her travels at www.britonthemove.com or follow along on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Similar Posts

Peppa Pig Theme Park – A Certified Autism Center

Peppa Pig Theme Park – A Certified Autism Center

A British animated series “Peppa Pig” hit kids worldwide in 2004.  Soon after the launch of the series, it became famous worldwide. This humanlike pig and her family have been experiencing adventures with her friends for over 300 episodes, all the while teaching crucial social and emotional skills.  And now, there’s a Peppa Pig Theme…

De Leon Springs aka “Ponce De Leon Springs State Park”

De Leon Springs aka “Ponce De Leon Springs State Park”

DeLeon Springs State Park in Florida has become the most popular place in this tourist-packed state. This State Park is one of the most beautiful and exciting places you can visit in the U.S. Before we get into the details of why you should visit, let’s clear up the naming! Officially, the park’s name is …

Things to Do in Miramar Beach – Beachside Bliss

Things to Do in Miramar Beach – Beachside Bliss

Are you looking to explore Florida’s Gulf Coast on your next getaway? Look no further than Miramar Beach, a gem tucked away between the bustling cities of Destin and Santa Rosa Beach along Florida’s Emerald Coast. Renowned for its stunning beaches, top-tier golf courses, and vibrant local culture, Miramar Beach has quickly emerged as a…

How To Work Remotely and Travel Efficiently

How To Work Remotely and Travel Efficiently

In today’s dynamic work landscape, working remotely and traveling have opened up exciting opportunities for digital nomads—individuals who embrace a location-independent lifestyle. As technology advances, more people choose remote work to explore the world. However, succeeding as a nomadic remote worker requires specific skills and strategies. Staying organized and striking a healthy work-life balance is…

Alternative Travel: What Is It and Is It The Future of Travel?

Alternative Travel: What Is It and Is It The Future of Travel?

Travel is back and bigger than ever – 49% of Americans say they plan on traveling more in 2023, while 87% said they expect to travel at least as much as they did in 2022, Forbes reports. Travelers are now increasingly looking for alternative travel experiences. This post may contain affiliate links. Please read our disclosure…

The Best 3 Weekend Getaways From Delhi For Couples

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

The Crazy Tourist

Home » Travel Guides » United States » Michigan (MI) » 10 Best Detroit Tours

10 Best Detroit Tours

Once infamous for its urban decline and dangerous reputation, Detroit has seen a revival in recent years. Historic buildings have been renovated, modern attractions have been installed, and decaying buildings have been transformed into tourist attractions in their own right.

Detroit is an excellent place to learn more about the impact of post-industrialization on middle America, and a great way to discover more of the city is to take a tour. With tours, you will be able to dive deep into the culture and unique character of Detroit with the help of locals and tourism experts.

These are the 10 best tours and experiences in and around Detroit.

1. The Rise, Fall & Renewal Walking Tour

Detroit, Michigan

Detroit is a city that has seen many changes; from its initial rise during the industrial era, through the population decline in the early modern age until today, where renewal efforts are seeing the city improve.

This tour takes you through this vast history of Detroit by showing you the architecture and attractions that have shaped the city – and been shaped by national economic events.

You will be shown enduring monuments like the Guardian Building, abandoned houses and renewed hotels, telling a story of how the city has survived through the years.

This is a two-hour tour that includes a free beverage at the Detroit Beer Company. You will also get to ride the famous People Mover.

2. Corktown Is Popping! Small Group Walking Tour

Corktown, Detroit

Corktown is famed as the oldest neighborhood in Detroit and is a great place to discover the roots of the city. Once a district settled mostly by Irish immigrants, Corktown still retains much of this Irish flavor in its buildings, pubs, and attractions.

More recently, diverse migration has resulted in the area being revived by multicultural restaurants and cafés, making it one of the hippest neighborhoods in town. This tour takes you around Corktown, allowing you to sample some of the best spots in the area.

You will be taken to the best pubs, Irish themed attractions, and renovated ruins across Corktown, telling you a story of the area and the city as a whole. A free beverage is included, and a short break for lunch is provided. This tour lasts two hours.

View Prices & Reviews

3. The D You Must See – Detroit Walking Tour with a Local

Comerica Park, Detroit

Walking tours are a great way to get your bearings in a new city after you first arrive. Detroit’s reputation can leave some visitors worried about the safest areas to visit, however, this tour has a local showing you the best spots that are sure to enrich your visit to Detroit.

This bumper half-day tour takes you around all the most important landmarks in the city – from the Guardian Building to Comerica Park. You will be shown ruins, revived buildings, and enduring landmarks across the city.

A complimentary snack is also included; choose between a local baklava in Greektown or a Coney Dog at Lafayette Coney Island. This is a grand tour to sample the city and prepare you for the rest of your visit to Detroit.

4. Detroit Urban Exploration and Photography Tour

Detroit Urban Exploration And Photography Tour

Population decline in Detroit has left many of the suburbs full of desolate ruins. Though this initially left the city in crisis, many of these abandoned sites have become tourist attractions.

Urban exploration is an increasingly popular activity; you get to explore abandoned buildings, teaching you about the architectural influences in the city and the impact humans have on the urban environment.

With this tour, you will be taken out into the suburbs of Detroit with a local guide, who will help you safely explore these abandoned areas.

These places are a photographer’s dream, providing a haunting backdrop for unique photos. The guide is also a professional photographer and will help you learn more about photography techniques to get the best out of your camera.

This tour takes you to abandoned schools, office buildings, and houses, giving you a unique insight into the Detroit way of life. It is conducted in small groups for a more personalized and intimate experience.

5. Operation City Quest Scavenger Hunt

Hart Plaza in Downtown Detroit,

Scavenger hunt tours are a great way to discover a new city if you are visiting as a group or family. They add a competitive element to the trip, allowing you to have fun and get to know your surroundings better.

This scavenger hunt by Operation City only requires you to use a smartphone and download their app. You are required to find up to 150 objects across a two-mile route in Central Detroit. It takes around two hours if completed non-stop; however, you are free to stop and start at your leisure if you want to spend more time in a particular location.

Though most scavenger hunt tours leave you a route on the app, this one also comes with an interactive guide who will give you clues whenever you need some extra help.

6. Corktown Tour: Historic Landmarks, Local Haunts, and Pubs

Michigan Central Station Building, Corktown, Detroit

This is another excellent tour of the Corktown Area and is great for travelers on a budget who are looking to discover a vibrant and unique area of Detroit. This tour allows you to enjoy a wide variety of local snacks – including shawarma, bagels and local beers.

This trip is incredibly in-depth. You’ll learn about the neighborhood’s Irish history and modern revival in detail. You will also visit local breweries and whiskey distilleries to learn about the brewing scene in Detroit and how it is helping renovate large areas of the city.

There is also a small urban exploration segment in the old Michigan Central Railroad Station. This tour is conducted in small groups, giving you an intimate experience.

7. Private Explore Detroit Tour Guide

Private Explore Detroit Tour Guide

If you are only in Detroit for a few days and have a set idea of the kind of attractions you want to visit, this is an excellent option. You will get five hours with a local tour guide, who will help you customize your itinerary in advance to get the best experience for your group.

Their specialty is in photography and urban exploration, so this is a great way to engage in those activities as a private group rather than joining an open tour. Your guide can also help you discover other attractions across the city and learn about the best areas to visit for dining and shopping.

You will be given professional photography advice, and there is private transportation provided between each location to ensure you get around quickly and safely.

8. Ski Bus to Mt Brighton from Detroit

Mt Brighton From Detroit

Only an hour and a half outside of Detroit, Mt Brighton is a major ski destination during the winter. It is popular with locals from across Michigan and surrounding states. This package includes transport from Central Detroit and Ann Arbor to the Mt Brighton ski area.

If you already know how to ski or snowboard, you can opt for the transportation option, giving you a quick and relaxing way to hit the slopes. For beginners, the tour is extended to include a short lesson in either skiing or snowboarding – it’s entirely your choice.

All equipment rental is included in the price, regardless of whether you take the lessons or not. There are plenty of bars and restaurants in the area to keep you refreshed after your skiing session, and return transportation is included.

9. Holly Jolly Hunt

Holly Jolly Hunt

For visitors during the festive season, this is another excellent scavenger hunt option with a Christmas theme. This is an attractive option for families as it encourages kids to search out various Christmas items and decorations across the city.

There are also some special surprises included bringing extra joy to your entire group. This game can be played competitively, with each player gaining points for each item they find. It takes around two hours to complete non-stop but can be paused and restarted if you want to spend more time in specific locations.

All of the items are found within the Downtown area of Detroit. To play this scavenger hunt, download the app onto your Apple or Android smartphone and open it up when you are ready to begin.

10. Classic Ann Arbor By The Sidewalk Food Tour

Classic Ann Arbor By The Sidewalk Food Tour

Ann Arbor is located within the Detroit Metropolitan Area – around an hour away from the City Centre. This is a great place to get away from the busier Detroit city, allowing you to experience a more authentic Michigan way of life.

Ann Arbor has a vibrant culinary scene, with cuisines from all over the world found in the Downtown and Kerrytown areas. This tour will take you to some of the best food vendors in the city to sample a snack from each location.

You are also given the opportunity to speak to local chefs and learn about the history and culture of Ann Arbor. This is a great day trip to make from Detroit; your tour guide will be happy to advise you on other attractions in the area.

10 Best Detroit Tours:

  • The Rise, Fall & Renewal Walking Tour
  • Corktown Is Popping! Small Group Walking Tour
  • The D You Must See - Detroit Walking Tour with a Local
  • Detroit Urban Exploration and Photography Tour
  • Operation City Quest Scavenger Hunt
  • Corktown Tour: Historic Landmarks, Local Haunts, and Pubs
  • Private Explore Detroit Tour Guide
  • Ski Bus to Mt Brighton from Detroit
  • Holly Jolly Hunt
  • Classic Ann Arbor By The Sidewalk Food Tour

Motor City Photography Workshops

abandoned detroit tour

  • See all photos

abandoned detroit tour

Similar Experiences

abandoned detroit tour

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Bridget I

Motor City Photography Workshops - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

These 9 Abandoned Places In Detroit Are Absolutely Haunting

abandoned detroit tour

Marika Kazimierska

More by this Author

Motor City is well known for its urban blight, and the numerous buildings in abandoned Detroit can make areas feel like a ghost town. Some of these Detroit abandoned neighborhoods that have been shunned and vacated can seem haunting, to say the least, but we can’t forget that many of them also hold significant history. So take a look at these 9 abandoned places in Detroit that remind us of our city’s past and the eerie feelings they leave us with.

abandoned detroit tour

abandoned detroit tour

Related Stories

Follow An Abandoned Railroad Line, Falling Waters Trail, For One Of The Most Unique Hikes Near Detroit

Follow An Abandoned Railroad Line, Falling Waters Trail, For One Of The Most Unique Hikes Near Detroit

The Remnants Of This Abandoned Church In Detroit Are Hauntingly Beautiful

The Remnants Of This Abandoned Church In Detroit Are Hauntingly Beautiful

10 Staggering Photos Of An Abandoned High School That Once Stood In Detroit

10 Staggering Photos Of An Abandoned High School That Once Stood In Detroit

abandoned detroit tour

Are there any other buildings in abandoned Detroit worthy of a mention? Let us know in the comment section below! If you’re interested in reading up on the subject, there are many books available that discuss abandoned Detroit and the decline of the Motor City.

If you’re interested in more spooky things in Detroit, than you must read about this cemetery in Detroit that is only opened twice a year!

OnlyInYourState may earn compensation through affiliate links in this article. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

Want more Detroit in your inbox?

Get the latest on things to see, do, and eat around Detroit!

Thank you! You'll receive your first newsletter soon!

An error occured.

More to Explore

Haunted places in detroit.

Are there any haunted restaurants or bars in Detroit?

The abandoned places listed above aren't the only spooky spots in Detroit. Motor City is home to its fair share of haunted locations, as well. One of the most haunted restaurants in Detroit is Cadieux Cafe, located on Cadieux Road. This long-running, family-owned eatery is housed in a former speakeasy, and it's known for excellent mussels and beer as well as feather bowling and live music. What some people don't know about Cadieux Cafe, however, is that it's rumored to be haunted. Both patrons and employees have experienced things with no logical explanations, such as objects moving of their own accord. People have also spotted apparitions, including that of the owner's deceased mother.

What haunted hiking trails can I take in Detroit?

Did you know there is a haunted hike near Detroit ? Just an hour from the city proper, Ghostly Grove is a 3/4-mile forest trail that will send you running for the hills. The trail is located on the grounds of the on the Schnell Family Farm Orchard, and it leads through the abandoned woods on the edge of the property. Legend has it, the trail is haunted by Johnny Appleseed's twin sister, Abigail. Evil lurks around every corner, just waiting to pop out and send your heart leaping into your throat. Ghostly Grove is only open during the Halloween season, and it's so worth marking the calendar for!

What are the most haunted places in Detroit?

There are plenty of haunted places in Detroit that are sure to make your hair stand on end. One of them is The Whitney, the 1894 home of lumber baron, David Whitney Jr., who was the wealthiest man in Detroit at the time. The mansion is now a restaurant, and it has its fair share of ghost stories. Widely considered to be one of the most haunted buildings in the city, The Whitney is home to apparitions, strange shadows, and other ghostly occurrences, both of which have been spotted by visitors and staff members alike.

Related Articles

  • There's A Hike Near Detroit That Leads You Straight To An Abandoned 1920s Estate
  • Everyone Should See What’s Inside The Walls Of This Abandoned Book Warehouse In Detroit
  • This Tour Of An Abandoned Prison Near Detroit Is An Experience Unlike Any Other
  • 9 Gorgeous Lakes To Visit Around Detroit This Summer
  • The One County Near Detroit With Over 300 Lakes You'll Want To Visit
  • Some People Don’t Know That Detroit Was The First To Do These 7 Things
  • Here Are 10 Unique Day Trips Near Detroit That Are An Absolute Must-Do
  • Here Are Our 13 Favorite Eco-Friendly Travel Items To Celebrate Earth Day

Detroit's Abandoned Ruins Are Captivating, But Are They Bad For Neighborhoods?

On Assignment For HuffPost

For some, Detroit is symbolized by hulking ruins like the Michigan Central Depot, a 100-year-old train station that's sat empty for decades and drawn everyone from artists to Herman Cain . The crumbling buildings in the city seem to have a certain pull: so many photographers have captured them over the years that it recently prompted a satirical response from The Onion , "Artists Announce They've Found All the Beauty They Can in Urban Decay."

For residents of the city that an estimated 78,000 abandoned buildings, they're just part of the landscape.

detroit train station

Brush Park, a neighborhood where 19th-century mansions in disrepair dot stretches of empty land, is a ruin destination. Wally Nowinski, 29, lives there and can look down on the street from his window, where he's seen a steady increase in sightseers over the last several months. He told The Huffington Post he believes a fifth of car traffic on the weekend is from people looking at the ruins that make up his neighborhood.

brush park detroit

Entering abandoned buildings is against the law and not sanctioned by the city. It's also dangerous: there are many stories of unaware visitors being robbed of expensive camera equipment . But there are several places to get guided tours of the city's most captivating abandoned buildings, and according to the LA Times, interest in them has only increased. Tour guide and photographer Jesse Welter told the paper he has had more visitors , who he takes to places like a church, school and ballroom -- all abandoned.

Another tour guide told The Huffington Post that he's seen more visitors since Detroit filed for bankruptcy in July. Surprisingly, they're more likely now to be curious about the city's history, aiming to learn rather than gawk.

Some have expressed frustration at the way decline is glamorized or exploited -- it's called ruin porn for a reason -- rather than seen as part of the city's larger ills. While some think iconic buildings should be preserved for their historical significance, others them as eyesores, havens for crime or obstacles to the city's renewal. Many Detroiters were happy when the Brewster-Douglass projects, where Lily Tomlin and Diana Ross once lived, finally made the demolition list .

brewster detroit

In September, Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr declared a "blight emergency" to make it easier to tear down structures. The federally-appointed Detroit Blight Removal Task Force is charged with surveying abandoned structures and finding solutions -- it also counts Dan Gilbert as one of its leaders, the billionaire who has developed extensive portions of downtown Detroit.

In a Detroit News report about the task force, Jon George, founder and president of Motor City Blight Busters , described blight as "a cancer" -- if you don't stop it, it spreads . His nonprofit renovates houses and tears down abandoned ones.

Despite large swaths of vacant land, many buildings are being developed , and the city's downtown is full of renovated historic buildings. One of the city's famous ruins, the Packard Plant, was recently purchased; the owner plans to turn it into a mixed-use space .

detroit

But the Packard Plant still has a long way to go before it's rebuilt, and in the meantime, it will continue to attract urban explorers. Nowinski doesn't mind the intrusion: instead, he thinks that Detroit needs to do a better job capitalizing and making a profit on the interest in Detroit's abandoned buildings.

"All of the tourists I see means someone is making money," Nowinski said, whether it's an organized tour or indirect business for local restaurants and shops.

"The train station is our Coliseum. It's one of the most spectacular ruins in the world," he added. "No one calls it ruin porn in Rome. They call it tourism."

Support HuffPost

Our 2024 coverage needs you, your loyalty means the world to us.

At HuffPost, we believe that everyone needs high-quality journalism, but we understand that not everyone can afford to pay for expensive news subscriptions. That is why we are committed to providing deeply reported, carefully fact-checked news that is freely accessible to everyone.

Whether you come to HuffPost for updates on the 2024 presidential race, hard-hitting investigations into critical issues facing our country today, or trending stories that make you laugh, we appreciate you. The truth is, news costs money to produce, and we are proud that we have never put our stories behind an expensive paywall.

Would you join us to help keep our stories free for all? Your contribution of as little as $2 will go a long way.

Can't afford to donate? Support HuffPost by creating a free account and log in while you read.

As Americans head to the polls in 2024, the very future of our country is at stake. At HuffPost, we believe that a free press is critical to creating well-informed voters. That's why our journalism is free for everyone, even though other newsrooms retreat behind expensive paywalls.

Our journalists will continue to cover the twists and turns during this historic presidential election. With your help, we'll bring you hard-hitting investigations, well-researched analysis and timely takes you can't find elsewhere. Reporting in this current political climate is a responsibility we do not take lightly, and we thank you for your support.

Contribute as little as $2 to keep our news free for all.

Dear HuffPost Reader

Thank you for your past contribution to HuffPost. We are sincerely grateful for readers like you who help us ensure that we can keep our journalism free for everyone.

The stakes are high this year, and our 2024 coverage could use continued support. Would you consider becoming a regular HuffPost contributor?

The stakes are high this year, and our 2024 coverage could use continued support. If circumstances have changed since you last contributed, we hope you’ll consider contributing to HuffPost once more.

Already contributed? Log in to hide these messages.

Before You Go

abandoned detroit tour

The Ruins Of Detroit

Popular in the community, from our partner, huffpost shopping’s best finds, more in life.

abandoned detroit tour

Cookie banner

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy . Please also read our Privacy Notice and Terms of Use , which became effective December 20, 2019.

By choosing I Accept , you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies.

Share this story

abandoned detroit tour

16 dormant buildings in Detroit awaiting life

Around the turn of the century, dozens of buildings with architectural significance in Detroit became vacant. So many, in fact, that it seemed unlikely that a meaningful number would ever be brought back to life.

That of course is changing. Yes, Detroit has demolished its share of buildings and had planned redevelopments stall. But more often of late, buildings have been redeveloped and ambitious projects are moving forward. Some of these seemed incredibly unlikely just a few years ago.

But there’s still plenty of dormant buildings around town awaiting life. Here are the ones we’d most like to see redeveloped.

We’ve tried to stick to plans that either haven’t been announced publicly or which we’re skeptical about. Readers probably won’t be surprised to know that many of these buildings are owned by the Ilitches, the family that also owns Little Caesars Pizza, the Detroit Red Wings and Tigers, and recently built Little Caesars Arena .

Which ones did we miss? Leave a comment below and maybe we’ll include it in the next update.

Note: Buildings are listed geographically from west to east.

  • Detroit’s most senseless building demolitions, mapped
  • 6 Detroit buildings that almost didn’t make it
  • Mapping big renovations underway in Detroit

Cooley High School

An astounding work of Mediterranean Revival architecture, Thomas M. Cooley High School was designed by the renowned Detroit firm Donaldson & Meier. It opened in 1928 and flourished as a school for many decades until it was closed by the district in 2010.

One group, the Cooley Reuse Project, has been trying unsuccessfully to redevelop the building for years. In 2017, a fire ravaged the showpiece auditorium , making it less likely the school will be saved.

  • Open in Google Maps
View this post on Instagram A post shared by Ben Groves (@guerrillaexplora) on Apr 29, 2018 at 4:28am PDT

AMC Headquarters

Built in 1927 for the Kelvinator Corporation, an appliance manufacturer, this complex eventually expanded to 1.46 million square feet . The company merged with the American Motors Corporation, hence the building’s name change, which was later bought by Chrysler. After going bankrupt in 2007, Chrysler sold the building for $2.3 million.

The AMC building nearly got demolished in 2016. Then there were hints in 2018 that the city might buy it from the county and find a developer. But there’s been no news since.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Detroit Rob (@oxymento) on Aug 19, 2016 at 8:19am PDT

“It went from a towering symbol of wealth to a towering symbol of Detroit’s decay,” writes Historic Detroit .

This extravagant Art Deco building opened in 1927 as “residential hotels” for Detroit’s elite. It struggled to stay afloat almost immediately and eventually closed in 1997. It’s suffered from vandalism ever since: its copper roof was stripped and 24 terra cotta lion stolen.

It’s also been the subject of redevelopment speculation (and failed plans) for years. In 2019, the city of Detroit sold the building to developers who presented a $50 million plan to turn it into 180 apartment units, many of which will be for low-income renters. Because of the amount of work required, we’re still taking a wait-and-see approach.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Fernández Holley (@fdholley2016) on Jul 18, 2019 at 7:14pm PDT

Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church

Arguably, the most famous church interior in Detroit. When the Woodward Avenue church opened in 1911, the Detroit Times called it “one of the most handsomest churches in the country.” There was infighting in the congregation in the later part of the 20th century, and when its controversial pastor died in 2005, the church closed.

Plans to revive the church in 2009 fell through. It’s been heavily vandalized and there’s been little news of late.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by The Most Amazing Architecture (@amazearchitecture) on Jun 14, 2019 at 12:12am PDT

CPA Building

Despite being in a prime real estate location across from Michigan Central Station, this attractive triangular building has sat undeveloped since it closed over 20 years ago. New York-based Sequoia Property Partners bought the building in 2014 for $900,000 and has done nothing with it since. It avoided demolition in 2016 , but we’re still waiting for someone to develop it.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Fernández Holley (@fdholley2016) on May 2, 2018 at 10:33am PDT

Hotel Fort Wayne

Built in 1926 as the Hotel Fort Wayne, after new ownership its name changed to the American Hotel in the 1960s. The 300-room hotel closed in the 1990s and has remained vacant since.

Owned by the Ilitches, the family’s firm Olympia Development of Michigan said that it would restore and convert the building into 163 apartments as part of its multi-neighborhood and unfulfilled District Detroit project. Aside from boarding up windows, there’s been no visible movement on the property.

A vacant rectangular brick building at an intersection.

Alhambra Apartments

Built in the late 1800s, the six-story Romanesque building had high-end apartments for most of its existence. As the Cass Corridor declined, so did the building, which first became a motel, then back to apartments for low-income renters before closing in 2006.

The Alhambra is also owned by the Ilitches, which bought the building in 2009 and announced plans to turn it into a 46 apartments as part of District Detroit. It missed a development deadline in 2018 and there’s been no movement since.

A multi-story boarded up building whose bricks have been painted red and white.

Hotel Eddystone

One of three three Italian Renaissance hotels built by Lew Tuller, the Hotel Eddystone was designed by renowned Detroit architect Louis Kamper and opened in 1924. Like many other buildings on this list, the Eddystone had trouble staying afloat and closed in the late 1990s.

The building was bought by the Ilitches and saved from demolition as part of an agreement in which Olympia did demolish its neighbor , the Park Avenue Hotel. The company announced plans to turn it into a 96-unit apartment building, but missed deadlines. It reached an agreement with the city to pursue a $40.9 million development, but we remain skeptical.

A tall, vacant stone building in front of a cement parking lot. There’s graffiti around the first floor.

Loyal Order of Moose Lodge

This Neoclassical building was built for the fraternal organization of the same name in 1922. While several plans have been floated over the years to bring it back to life, including one from 1994 to turn it into a nightclub , it’s been vacant for decades.

The lodge is yet another building owned by the Ilitches, which bought it in 2007 for $1.5 million. The company did some cosmetic work to the facade in 2013, and teased the public with possible redevelopment plans in 2017, but nothing has come to fruition.

abandoned detroit tour

Fine Arts Theatre

It’s surprising that this over 100-year-old theatre designed by C. Howard Crane, with its prominent location on Woodward near Brush Park, hasn’t been redeveloped. Perhaps it has something to do with its fascinating and sordid history .

It last sold in 2016 for $1.3 million to Birmingham pharmacist Hany Boutros. He never released his plans for the building, which has been lightly used over the last two decades, and no visible work has taken place.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Desert Druid (@desert_druid) on Jun 26, 2016 at 2:15pm PDT

Park Avenue Building

This Albert Kahn–designed office building on the edge of Grand Circus Park opened in the 1920s but has been vacant for many years. In 2018, it had begun to deteriorate so badly that debris was falling on the sidewalk .

Later that year, it was bought by Rino Soave for $4.9 million. The developer announced major plans to convert the building into up to 100 apartments at a cost of $10 million to $15 million. But little work has been done on the buiding since

abandoned detroit tour

Detroit Life Building

Named after the Detroit Life Insurance Company, this Neoclassical building downtown opened in 1923. It’s been abandoned since 1977. Mike Ilitch bought the building, along with the Fox Theatre, in the 1980s. A new roof was installed in 2005 and it had some facade work done in 2018. Olympia has proposed various development plans for the building over the years, but none have come to fruition.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by JM (@houseof9nine) on Jun 7, 2016 at 3:22pm PDT

United Artists Theatre

Opening in 1928, it was another of Detroit’s “movie palaces” designed by C. Howard Crane. Historic Detroit has a great description of the interior: “The UA featured a grand, circular lobby, complete with mirrors and huge Indian maidens on the walls that looked down on audiences. The United Artists’ auditorium was like a cathedral of cinema and said to be acoustically perfect, and was decorated with Gothic plaster and interesting brass light fixtures.”

After years of decline, it closed in 1975. The Iliches bought the building in 1997 and even back then planned on demolishing it. Olympia released the development rights to Bagley Development, owned by Emmett Moten who is planning a $56 million redevelopment of the building , but at the cost of demolishing the theater.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Calvin Johnson (@calvin76bt) on Apr 11, 2017 at 8:05pm PDT

Old Wayne County Building

An ornate work of Beaux Arts architecture, the 44,625-square-foot, 18-court room Wayne County Building opened in 1902. From Historic Detroit : “The interior is decked out in mahogany, oak, birch, maple and sycamore. The halls are lined with a variety of marbles, including Sienna, English vein, white Italian, Alps green, Verona, red any yellow Numidian and others. The columns throughout the building are imitation marbles representing Siennas and Numidians, among others.”

Though the county left in 2010, the building is still in good shape. Unlike others on this list, parts of the building have been restored over the years, most recently in 2018. It’s owned by a group of New York investors who have been looking for a tenant since purchasing the building for over $10 million in 2014.

A Renaissance Revival stone courthouse with columns at the front entrance and copper statues on the roof.

Brodhead Naval Armory

Detroit has always been an important shipment hub, as proven by this former armory just east of Belle Isle, which served as a training site for the Navy and Marines. The Art Deco building with a huge indoor drill floor opened in 1930— Joe Louis fought his first bout there in 1932.

The building closed in 2004 and scrappers have done significant damage to it . For years, the city, which owns the building, has unsuccessfully tried to find a developer . It would certainly be a fascinating opportunity should the right buyer come along.

abandoned detroit tour

Vanity Ballroom

An incredible piece of Aztec-themed Art Deco architecture, the Vanity Ballroom was an iconic venue on Detroit’s east side that hosted jazz greats like Duke Ellington and Ella Fitzgerald, as well as punk rock pioneers the Stooges and MC5.

It closed in 1988 and is considered “the last intact ballroom of Detroit’s great dance halls.” Preservation of the venue will be tough—for years the building didn’t have a roof—but not impossible. Jefferson East, Inc. has taken steps to secure the building and fundraise for its restoration, which it estimates will cost around $12 million.

abandoned detroit tour

Loading comments...

Site search.

  • Los Angeles
  • San Francisco
  • Archive.curbed.com
  • For Sale in Detroit
  • For Rent in Detroit
  • Curbed Comparisons
  • Neighborhoods
  • Development

  • Architecture
  • Historic Preservation
  • Public Transit

Shot with my phone - Oneplus 5T

6 Stunning Detroit Locations Every Urbex Photographer Should Shoot

Urban Exploration Photography (urbex for short) is the art of finding old and abandoned buildings and locations, exploring them, and shooting pictures.  It has been a passion of mine for quite some time and can be very exciting, perhaps due to the potential of danger at every turn.

Abandoned Detroit Urbex Photography | Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church | abandoned detroit | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

The first thing I want to cover is the legality of Urban Exploration Photography, because this is sometimes a grey area depending on where you go, but most times involves trespassing.  I know some urbex photographers that will break and enter, but not me.  I treat it like I'm in a National Park...take only pictures, leave only footprints.  Most buildings will have an access point if you just look around.  Some will even have security guards present, which you can either move on from or ask if it's alright to shoot some photos.  You'd be surprised at how many will allow some shots taken as long as you are respectful.

The locations described here are all easily accessible, some more than others, and none had visible No Trespassing signs posted.  At East Grand Boulevard Methodist Church we climbed down through a window onto a ladder that was pretty rickety, only to discover when we left that the front door was open.  The chain on it was not locked, but I forgot to check.  At least it made it more exciting, right?  The rest of these locations are literally wide open so anyone can walk in without having to risk a B & E charge!

East Grand Boulevard Methodist Church

Abandoned East Grand Boulevard Methodist Church | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

On the corner of Gratiot Avenue and East Grand Boulevard lies one of the oldest churches in Detroit. Gratiot Avenue Methodist Episcopal Mission was founded in 1888, when most of the land east of Mt. Elliot Street was farmland. For 12 years the church moved from one location to another, "...and four times was obliged to take quarters either adjoining to or above a saloon, where the tinkle of the slot piano mingled with doxology," according to the Detroit Free Press newspaper in 1908.

Abandoned East Grand Boulevard Methodist Church | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

In 1899, the church moved to a permanent location on Bellevue, building a wood frame chapel in 1900. The congregation grew to 149 in 1904, and in 1907, Reverend Charles Ryerson was assigned to lead the church, no longer a mission. His first goal was the construction of a new church on land that had been bought a few blocks away on the corner of Gratiot and East Grand Boulevard. On one Sunday alone, he raised $10,000 towards the construction of the church. ( source )

Abandoned East Grand Boulevard Methodist Church | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Walking from the front door on Gratiot Ave will take you straight into the main congregation area.  There's a wrap around balcony here, but watch your step, it's littered with bird poop.  You may want to wear a mask or ventilator.  From here you can just wander around side rooms and stairwells, making notice of how the light slips through the boarded up windows.  On the northeast side is the gymnasium, which also has a spectator balcony to shoot from...pretty cool!  Don't forget the basement.  It's as big as the church and has tons of small rooms that were once used as offices and children's classrooms.

Abandoned East Grand Boulevard Methodist Church | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Fisher Body Plant 21

Fisher Plant | Detroit Michigan | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | Urbex | Abandoned | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

The Fisher Body Company, formed in 1908 by Albert Fisher and his nephews Charles and Fred, initially produced bodies for both the carriage and auto industries, though they dropped the carriage line in 1911. At the time auto bodies were made of a mixture of shaped wood and metal, the construction of which was a complicated process requiring skilled tradesmen. Automakers found it was more cost-effective to outsource body construction; by 1910’s Fisher was producing high-quality automotive bodies for Cadillac, Ford, Studebaker, and Hudson, among other names.

Check out my article with images from abandoned Gary, Indiana .

Fisher Plant | Detroit Michigan | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | Urbex | Abandoned | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Today despite over $1 million dollars of work, the site is still considered “contaminated” by the EPA. The front of the building facing Harper avenue has been cleared and is now used as a Police auto impound lot. Looming over rows of towed cars is a building in steady decline, slowly being broken down by natural elements. Several sections of the floor have caved in, the cement being eaten away by water and broken by ice. At least one fire heavily damaged the ground level of the first floor. The City of Detroit is seeking interested developers to renovate the site, but as of yet there have been no takers. For just $300,000, you could own a slice of automotive history with a great view of the city. ( source )

Fisher Plant | Detroit Michigan | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | Urbex | Abandoned | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

This place is an urbex photographers dream!  Six floors of abandoned automotive industry relics complete with a rooftop water tower.  It's a pretty well-known spot so don't be too surprised if you run into other people exploring the site as well.  Fisher Body Plant 21 is located on Piquette Avenue & Brush Street.

Fisher Plant | Detroit Michigan | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | Urbex | Abandoned | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Highland Street in Highland Park

Abandoned Highland Street | Highland Park | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Highland Street west of Woodward Avenue in Highland Park is a particularly troubled street in a troubled city. Once the civic center of the city, it is now lined by vacant apartment buildings, schools, and hospitals.  There are literally blocks of abandoned buildings here to explore, but be careful, of not only people, but the structures themselves.  As you can see here, some of the buildings are extremely unstable.

Abandoned Highland Street | Highland Park | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Though Highland Street today looks grim, plans for a major redevelopment of the area by New York-base Galapagos Art Space were announced in December of 2014. Most of the vacant civic structures are part of a planned arts community. ( source )

Abandoned Highland Street | Highland Park | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Hutchins Middle School

Abandoned Hutchins Middle School | Detroit Michigan | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Hutchins Intermediate opened on March 6th, 1922. Mary Mumford, son of school board member Samuel C. Mumford, unlocked the front door, and Louise Cody, daughter of superintendent Frank Cody, pressed the button for the opening bell. Though the school had a capacity of 1,500, only 900 students were enrolled, as the school initially had seventh and eighth grade programs. The first principal was Mercy J. Hayes.

Abandoned Hutchins Middle School | Detroit Michigan | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

On it's opening, The Detroit Free Press marveled at the amenities of the new school, calling Hutchins "the last word in equipment." The vocational wing boasted shops for woodworking, machinery, printing, electricity, and gas engine repair. The school was built of white brick and stone on steel, with corridor floors of battleship linoleum with a terrazzo base. Classrooms and the gymnasiums had floors of hard maple. A rarity when it was built , the school had an automatic telephone system which allowed any part of the school to make or receive calls.

Abandoned Hutchins Middle School | Detroit Michigan | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Despite the strong academic performance of the school, enrollment continued to decline. In 2007, the Hutchins program and its 372 students were moved to the newer McMichael School on McGraw and 16th Streets, about 20 blocks southwest. Many parents decided to switch schools rather than have their children walking such a long distance through dilapidated neighborhoods. The Hutchins building became the new home for the Crosman Alternative School, which moved out of their old building a few blocks away. The program started out with 309 students in 2007, but had fallen to 229 students by 2009. Crosman at Hutchins closed that year. Two years later in 2011, the once successful Hutchins at McMichael program closed as well. Scrappers found their way into the building in the summer of 2013, and within a few months had stripped it clean of most of its metal. ( source )

Abandoned Hutchins Middle School | Detroit Michigan | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Easily seen from the Lodge Fwy near the Clairmount Ave exit, Hutchins School is a huge building.  A photographer could spend days here and still not see every room.  The school has two gyms, two pools complete with locker rooms, a giant boiler room, a beautifully ornate library, an auditorium, and as many classrooms as you care to enter.  Most of the classrooms have gorgeous maple built-ins and some have theater seating.  A once magnificent building now left in decay.

Abandoned Hutchins Middle School | Detroit Michigan | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

If you like abandoned schools, read my article Abandoned High School | Gary, Indiana | Urbex Photography . 

St Agnes Church & School

Abandoned St Agnes Church School | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

In 1910, the LaSalle Park neighborhood was far from bustling downtown Detroit. Only a few houses had been built along 12th Street, leaving long open tracts of countryside. But Bishop John Foley, leader of the Detroit Catholic Archdiocese had watched the city grow rapidly, and knew that it wouldn’t be long before this area would fill up with houses too. With that in mind, he bought a parcel of land on the corner of 12th Street and LaSalle Street as a possible site for a future church. He didn’t have to wait long.

Abandoned St Agnes Church School | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

St. Agnes thrived through the middle part of the century, growing to 1,600 families, three priests, 22 nuns, and a girl’s high school with 180 students by 1964 – the 50th anniversary of the church. A few years later though, a police raid on an after-hours drinking establishment down the street led to a confrontation between officers and residents that quickly grew into one of the worst outbursts of civil unrest the country would ever see. Though St. Agnes was relatively unscathed by the 1967 riots, most of the buildings around it along 12th Street were burned to the ground. The neighborhood never recovered, and attendance numbers started to drop.

Abandoned St Agnes Church School | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

The future of the church is still very much up in the air, but there is a new owner. In June of 2012, Scott Griffin, a theater producer and real estate investor bought the church for $90,000. Though he has no immediate plans for the buildings, he has secured them against further trespass, and is talking with the community about what can be done with it. ( source )

Abandoned St Agnes Church School | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

The main congregation area is massive here, with the cathedral ceiling shooting straight into the air, making for some stunning images.  Don't miss exploring the adjacent school which can be accessed through a pitch black tunnel leading to a boiler room.  A flashlight is a must.  The images seen here were taken using long exposures, some over one minute, while I painted the areas I wanted with my flashlight.

Abandoned St Agnes Church School | Detroit Michigan | Detroit Urbex | Urbex Photography | Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church (Curvy Church)

Abandoned Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church | Curvy Church | Detroit Urbex | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

The origins of what would become Woodward Avenue’s most distinctive and unique churches had a very modest beginning in the basement of the home of Richard Owen on Alger Street on June 25th, 1907. A meeting was held by a group of residents to address the growing number of Presbyterian families moving into the area who did not regularly attend church because the lack of one nearby. The “North Woodward Presbyterian Committee” found that they were 260 families in the area, numbering around 1,000 individuals that could be served by construction of a new church. It was resolved at this meeting to establish such a church, the plan for which was approved by the Presbytery a few months later. The first meeting of public worship of the new church was held in November in the auditorium of a nearby church, attended by 150.

Abandoned Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church | Curvy Church | Detroit Urbex | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

What rose along Woodward Avenue over 1909 to 1911 was a masterpiece of modern English Gothic design: Two square towers flanking a gabled entrance of carved stone, with the octagonal sanctuary rising up behind to a lantern-style dome of stained glass and stone at the center. At the rear was the Sunday school wing, with classrooms and recreational facilities. The exterior of rock-faced brownstone quarried in Polk County, PA has a rough, hewn look to it, contrasting with the smooth limestone trim.

Abandoned Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church | Curvy Church | Detroit Urbex | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Inside the arched sanctuary, curving wood pews were arranged in a fan shape around the altar, with a matching balcony sweeping around the rear. The massive pipe organ, also donated by Mrs. Tracy McGregor, was built by the Stevens Organ Company of Marietta, Ohio.

Abandoned Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church | Curvy Church | Detroit Urbex | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

Over the summer of 2011, the church was used as a set for the movie “Alex Cross.” In preparation for shooting, much of the debris was cleared out of the building, and the pews were moved to make way for a boxing ring built in the center. After shooting wrapped, the pews were put back – albeit slightly haphazardly – and covered with a plastic tarp. The church was re-secured with steel panels over many of the entrances. In the fall of 2014, workers began repairing the roof and gutting the interior of the church in preparation for renovation, though few details are available. ( source )

Abandoned Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church | Curvy Church | Detroit Urbex | Detroit, Michigan | Urbex Photography | Image By Indiana Architectural Photographer Jason Humbracht | image by Detroit architectural photographer Jason Humbracht

For tips on how to improve your interior architecture shots, go to my post Interior Real Estate Photography: 5 Tips for Better Results .

Related Images:

abandoned detroit tour

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

abandoned places in detroit

Covering 10 Crazy Abandoned Places in Detroit For 2023

Crumbling factories, deserted factories, and proud churches that still stand tall despite their decaying interiors – these are just a few of the abandoned places in Detroit. But peel away the layers of dirt, grime, and graffiti and you’ll find the forbidden allure that calls out to urban explorers.   

Detroit, Michigan has gone through major economic and demographic decline. Detroit’s population, at its peak in 1950 with 1,850,000 residents, came crashing down to just 680,000 residents in 2015. In the wake of these drastic changes, Detroit left behind a trail of economic blight and abandoned places. 

Discovering Abandoned Places in Detroit

This makes Detroit an ideal spot for an urbex adventure. These abandoned places in Detroit may not continue to serve any purpose to the people they were built for but they remain as historical monuments and works of art to urban explorers . Urban explorers may be the last to witness these cultural sites and record them for prosperity.   

A quick Google search will show many results for abandoned places in Detroit. In fact, after Jacksonville, Florida , Detroit may be the best city in the United States for urban exploration. Here is our list of the top ten abandoned places in Detroit that you should visit before they are gone.

Note: All of the below places can be explored as of mid 2020. However, it should be noted that all properties here, and many other abandoned places in Detroit, are private property, and exploring would be considered trespassing.

While there are some that are relatively unwatched, there are others under strict supervision around the clock. Do your due diligence, be smart, and read our resource Caught Trespassing? Staying Out Of Trouble Urbexing in 2020 .

Fisher Body Plant #21

The Fisher Body Company was founded in 1908 by Albert Fisher and his nephews Charles and Fred. Originally the company produced bodies for horse-drawn carriages and then later on for the auto industry.   

During the early days of the automobile industry, the passenger compartment or the body of the vehicle could be swapped out on different makes to meet the customer’s specifications. The customers could also choose between various amenities of the day. 

The body of the vehicles was a complicated process that needed to be constructed by skilled craftsmen. Auto manufacturers outsourced this component of vehicle production. Fisher manufactured bodies for Cadillac, Huson, Ford, and Studebaker, among other names. 

Business was good for Fisher and they expanded their operations to meet the increasing demand. Eventually they operated over forty plants in Detroit, Cleveland, Flint, and Ontario. 

Fisher body plant number twenty-one was built just down the street from Ford’s workshop. Designed by Albert Kahn, the six-story building was built in 1919. It featured reinforced concrete construction and large floor to ceiling windows to bring in the natural light. 

During WWII the plant retooled to produce parts for airplanes, guns, and tanks needed in the war. After the war, Fisher started to recede from public view, and in November of 1982 the plant was officially closed. 

It was then purchased by Carter Color Company and used for industrial painting however this didn’t last long as Carter Company filed for bankruptcy in 1993 and then the building was added to the list of abandoned places in Detroit. Ownership of the site is now in the hands of the city of Detroit. 

Get More Information

Packard Automotive Plant

The Packard factory consists of 43 buildings on Detroit’s east side of town. Known for its post-apocalyptic look the abandoned factory is a wasteland of crumbling concrete, graffiti, and rubble. 

A century ago, The Packard name was equivalent to luxury and the company wanted its factory to reflect that. Albert Khan, the same architect who designed the Fisher Body Plant, created a reinforced concrete building that accommodated more than 40,0000 workers and took up more than four million square feet. 

Like many other factories, it retooled for WWII production and began building aircraft engines but after the war, Packard couldn’t get back into its groove. In the mid-1950s the last Packard automobile rolled off the line and then the buildings were mainly used for storage until the 1970s. 

There was always hope that someday the buildings would find a new life but they were too expensive to tear down so they say abandoned and decaying. A Spanish developer bought the Packard plant in 2012 with the vision of turning it into residential units, commercial spaces, restaurants, and an art gallery but progress remains slow. 

While most of the buildings still sit in ruins it has come a long way. The project could take up to fifteen years to complete and it ranks as one of the world’s most difficult and ambitious redevelopment projects to date. Today it still sits as one of the abandoned places in Detroit that every urban explorer should visit. 

Roosevelt Warehouse

The Roosevelt Warehouse is one of the key abandoned places in Detroit. The building was used as a school book depository for the city of Detroit during the 1980s after the Post Office moved to a new location but the building caught fire and caused millions of dollars worth of damage. 

Today, acres of rotting books cover the floor of the building which has been left open to the elements. The building became infamous in 2009 when the body of a homeless man was found encased in ice in an old elevator shaft. Since that time patrols around the building have increased and all of the entrances have been boarded up.   

In the summer of 2012, the contents of the building were excavated as the city of Detroit began to make preparations to convert the old warehouse into a parking garage. 

Michigan Theater

In 1926 the Michigan Theater was one of the most stunning and decadent buildings in Detroit. Designed by Cornelius and George Rapp, the 4,000 seat theater was a symbol of opulence and luxury in Detroit. The four-story building with chandeliers and marble columns would hold 1,000 cinema attendees to see classic vaudeville acts such as Jack Benny, Red Skelton, Betty Grable, and the Marx Brothers. 

An enormous Wurlitzer organ played along with the films of the silent era and in 1929 the theater was wired for sound. Eventually, the theater moved to show mostly movies although Louis Armstrong played Michigan Theater in 1936. 

By the 1960s the Michigan Theater struggled financially and held its last showing in 1971. The theater then changed hands several times as it tried on different identities. It was the host of an elegant supper club and even a rock music venue but by 1976 the theater was closed again. 

The owners initially wanted to demolish the theater right away to make room for a parking lot but a structural survey indicated removing the theater would weaken a thirteen-story office building attached to it. Instead the theater was gutted and converted into a parking garage. 

Parts of the theater were preserved including the lobby, decorative plasterwork on the ceilings, the balcony, and the projection room. 

Today the old Michigan Theater is somewhat of a tourist destination. Urban explorers and tourists alike make their way to the building to marvel in its past splendor. Today, football fans tailgate in the garage under the same roof that once filled with the sounds of great musicians and performers of the past. 

St. Agnes Catholic Church

Bishop John Foley, a leader of the Detroit Catholic Archdiocese, believed it was time for a new church in the growing LaSalle Park neighborhood. He recruited Rev. Henigan led the church and in April of 1914 the church held its first mass. 

The congregation grew quickly and soon needed a larger physicality. Construction of the permanent location of St. Agnes church and school started in 1922. The church was built in the gothic style by Van Leyen, Schilling, Keough, and Renolds. Later on a custom-built organ became a centerpiece of the church. 

St. Agnes thrived, growing to accommodate more than 1,600 families, three priests, twenty-two nuns, and a girl’s high school with 18 students by 1964. Just a few years later a police raid on an after-hours drinking establishment quickly grew into one of the worst outbursts of civil unrest in Detroit history. 

Though St. Agnes was left untouched by the riots the buildings around it burnt to the ground and attendance numbers began to decline. Just 162 families were worshipping at St. Agnes in 1986 when the church decided to merge with St. Theresa Avila in 1989 formed a new parish that would continue. 

The school closed in 2000 and afterward was used for storage. In 2006 it became impractical to continue on and maintain the building. The church was closed and put up for sale. The Archdiocese removed the pews and stained glass and a new congregation bought the building but they never took possession of it. Instead the church fell into ruin and disrepair. 

Metal thieves stole the organ’s pipes and vandalism faded the former glory of the church during the early 2000s. The future of the church is still very much up in the air. Scott Griffin purchased the building in 2012 and secured it from future trespassing but has no plans to develop the building. 

Highland Park High School

Highland Park, a separate city located in the borders of Detroit , is also home to many abandoned places in Detroit. Highland Park met a fate similar to Detroit were budget cuts led to closures of fire stations libraries and schools.   

Highland Park High School was attended by the children of the Ford Plant’s workers. It featured English architecture with a central building that was three stories tall and two end wings linked by classrooms. The east wing had an auditorium and the west wing had a three-story gymnasium featuring a swimming pool. The school included dedicated classrooms for botany, sewing, machine tooling, drawing, and chemistry. 

The exterior of the building featured grey limestone with moldings and details work in Bedford stone. Eventually, the school faced problems with overcrowding and a new building was constructed in 1917. The building was the same style but laid out slightly differently. This new building became a school for girls. Later on the two schools joined together and became co-ed. 

In the 1940s Ford moved production out of Highland Park into the suburbs hastening the flight of residents to the suburbs. The 1950s brought several newer schools to the Highland Park area and Highland Park High School gymnasium caught fire. The administrators put a temporary roof over the building because the damage was too costly to repair.  

Not wishing to demolish the limestone building, the gymnasium wing sat empty until it was turned into a multi-purpose concert hall in 1983. Eventually after accusations of misuse of funds and decline in the number of attendees the school ran out of money and closed down in 1995.   

George Ferris School

The George Ferris School also follows the line of boom and bust in Highland Park. The elementary school was built in 1911 to cope with the overwhelming number of students arriving each day brought by their parents who all worked at the Ford plant. 

Eventually the school shifted to become a middle school in 1960. It’s number then went through a period of decline and in the late 90s the George Ferris School closed its doors. There were plans to reopen the school but with the number of students still declining the plans were dropped.

The school has now been vacant for twenty years. During this time it was stripped of everything of value and the gardens are completely overgrown with vines and trees spreading out into the cafeteria. The school is one of the abandoned places in Detroit scheduled to be demolished though no work has started as of this time.   

Belle Island Nature Zoo

Belle Isle is a two and a half-mile long island in the Detroit River. This park was a getaway destination for many generations of Detroit residents. Sadly Belle Island has lost its past glory. 

The Detroit Zoo once called Belle Islands home. In 1956 the Detroit Zoo moved to its current home in Royal Oak and the Belle Isle location became a small children’s zoo.   

Later on in the 1980s the zoo was renamed to Safariland. By 2002 the zoo faced budget problems due to declining attendance and the zoo closed. The passage of public bonds gave funds to Belle Isle to build a new zoo at the other end of the island. The zoo construction cost millions of dollars and eventually closed in 2017.   

Today the zoo sites are both vacant and in severe disrepair. Trees have fallen in the walkway and graffiti covers the walls. The zoos have been used as film locations but it remains unclear whether the state of Michigan is interested in restoring Belle Isle to its former glory and reopening the zoos. 

Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church

Woodward Avenue was a masterpiece of Modern English Gothic Architecture. It featured towers and a gabled entrance carved of stone. The octagonal sanctuary has a magnificent stained-glass dome with stone at the center. Construction finished in 1911 and the church was outfitted with a massive pipe organ. 

In its early years the church was open seven days a week. It had recreational facilities including a multi-lane bowling alley and was a place where young people would meet and play sports. During the First World War shortages in coal led the church to close its doors except for two days a week. The Red Cross used the facility to train and raise funds for the war effort.

After the war the church began to grow and repairs were made to the interior of the church. But like many other churches in the area economic conditions of the 1950s led to many of the church’s congregations to move to the suburbs. The church continued to shrink through the 60s and 70s.

In 2005 the Rev. Douglas who was in charge of the church at the time died and left the church in a state of limbo. The building became one of the abandoned places in Detroit and scrapers and the elements took their toll on the building. The cost of restoring the building to its former glory is too high so it has sat vacant ever since, sitting as a beautiful example of the abandoned places in Detroit.

United Artist Theater

The United Artist Theater was once a part of Detroit’s theater district. Today it sits as one of the grandest abandoned places in Detroit. In 1927 United Artist began construction on a three million dollar theater in Downtown Detroit. The theater was designed by C. Howard Crane as motion pictures were replacing large state shows. The building also featured an office tower to bring in revenue during off-seasons. 

The United Artist Theater was hailed as a marvel of design and construction and quickly became Detroit’s premiere theater. Over the yeast the theater underwent several renovations. In the 1960s when people flocked to the suburbs downtown Detroit theaters had a difficult time gaining an audience.   

The theater began showing exploitation and pornographic films and eventually began to deteriorate. Eventually the theater closed. Plans to reopen the theater came and went. The Detroit Symphony used it as a concert hall for recording until the theater was unusable in 1983. 

The theater closed in 1984 and was put up for sale. It has been bought and sold several times since then but the high cost of renovations always made it difficult for investors. The theater remains in poor condition to this day with no plans announced for its future. For now, it remains one of the most intriguing abandoned places in Detroit.

Visit These Abandoned Places In Detroit Before They Are Gone

Whatever your motives for visiting abandoned places in Detroit you are sure to be met with the history of our past and quite a splendor. It’s quite the opposite of being out in nature. It allows you to see the greatness of early Detroit in a past time and reflect on the lack of permanence of time and the creations of mankind. 

If you are new to urban exploring read our ultimate guide to urban exploration and share this article with your friends. 

I toured 3 abandoned Detroit homes that are being auctioned off for $1,000. See what buyers can expect.

  • I toured three abandoned homes that are up for auction through the Detroit Land Bank Authority.
  • The three homes have fire damage, peeling paint, holes in the floors, and boarded-up windows. 
  • But after touring a fourth, renovated home, I could see the potential of the abandoned houses. 

During a recent trip to Detroit, I saw many neighborhoods filled with homes that were dilapidated and boarded up.

abandoned detroit tour

These abandoned homes point to the city's complicated past.

Detroit was once known as a city of industry. In the mid-1900s, people flocked to the Midwest for jobs in the auto industry, and the population boomed. In 1990, there were just over 1 million people calling Detroit home, but by the turn of the century, that number began to drop. In 2000, there were 951,270. Fast-forward to 2020, there are now only 670,031 people in Detroit.  

People left for a variety of reasons, including factories closing, racial tensions, white flight , and the 2008 housing crisis. 

As employment opportunities declined, some properties went into foreclosure due to unpaid taxes or mortgages, and they were left abandoned. Today, some of these buildings remain empty and now stand in ruins. 

In the past decade, the Detroit Land Bank Authority has started auctioning off these abandoned homes for as little as $1,000.

abandoned detroit tour

The Detroit Land Bank Authority is an organization that works with the local government to sell these homes to buyers. In 2014, the city of Detroit, Wayne County, and the state of Michigan started transferring ownership of the homes to the Land Bank. 

"It was an effort to consolidate a mass of publicly owned properties within the city of Detroit," said Alyssa Strickland, the assistant director of public relations and strategic initiatives at the Detroit Land Bank Authority. 

The homes go up for auction on the Lank Bank website, starting at $1,000. When the auctions close, the average home sells for just under $5,000, but some could reach $50,000. A buyer is then expected to renovate and restore the home to livable standards within six months to ensure it doesn't remain abandoned under the new ownership. 

Strickland said the bulk of the Land Bank's remaining inventory is "modest, single-family homes under 2,000 square feet."

I decided to tour a few of the $1,000 homes to see what buyers can expect. The first was this property in the Littlefield community.

abandoned detroit tour

When I pulled up to this house, I was surprised to find a structure almost completely hiding behind a wall of greenery. 

I had to enter the house through the back because of the broken front porch and boarded-up front door.

abandoned detroit tour

The vegetation at the back of the house was even more alarming than at the front. 

When I stepped inside, I entered a crumbling kitchen.

abandoned detroit tour

At that moment, I realized these homes aren't just abandoned. They're also completely ruined by time and weather. 

The living room was completely boarded up and dark.

abandoned detroit tour

The doors and windows on the first floor of each Land Bank house are boarded up, so no one can break in and squat there. It's a practical move, but it definitely added an eerie feeling to the unusual homebuying experience. 

On the second floor, I found two bedrooms, but the walls were blackened from a past fire.

abandoned detroit tour

Each of the rooms had holes in the floors, walls, and ceilings. 

The bathroom was torn to pieces. At this point, I realized just how much work it would take to bring one of these homes back to its former glory.

abandoned detroit tour

Strickland said buyers must try to finish renovating before the six-month deadline, but the Land Bank is lenient. 

"The vast majority of our buyers require an extension," Strickland said. "That's fine as long as they continue to make progress on the property." 

Otherwise, the Land Bank reserves the right to take the property back from the owners. 

The second house I visited just sold for $5,000.

abandoned detroit tour

Although the windows were boarded up, the house looked in much better shape than the first one. 

Once inside, I found a kitchen with no appliances, countertops, or even a ceiling.

abandoned detroit tour

In the right corner, there were pills all over the floor, and they continued throughout the rest of the house. 

The living room was void of light, but the fireplace caught my attention.

abandoned detroit tour

Although the windows were boarded up, I could still see the beautiful fireplace with leaves flowing out of it. For the first time during my tour, I could easily see how the house might come back to life with this beautiful brick fireplace as the focal point of the room.

The paint along the staircase to the second floor was peeling off the walls.

abandoned detroit tour

I stepped on paint chips all over the run-down house. 

The hallway at the top of the stairs was in terrible condition, too.

abandoned detroit tour

I imagined the cupboard at the end of the hallway could easily be fixed up as a nice vintage feature in this home. 

In the bedrooms, the paneling had fallen off the walls onto the charred flooring.

abandoned detroit tour

Although most of the bedrooms were derelict, all three were great sizes. 

The bathroom was in bad condition as well.

abandoned detroit tour

Just like the kitchen, the bathroom had various pills scattered across the floor and countertops. 

Back outside, the next-door neighbor said the house has sat abandoned for more than 10 years.

abandoned detroit tour

He explained that he's lived on this block, which has a few abandoned, boarded-up houses, for 50 years and watched as people left the neighborhood. 

"We're waiting for a new body of people who want to see change," he said. "Change is coming."

The third house I visited was located next to a public school and just sold for $94,000 after a bidding war during the auction process.

abandoned detroit tour

Strickland said the location of this home might have been the reason for the price to reach over $90,000. 

The home's kitchen was just as empty as the others I viewed.

abandoned detroit tour

At the very least, this kitchen had workable countertops. 

The living and dining rooms were dark spaces, but they had a lot of potential.

abandoned detroit tour

Although the window was boarded up in the living room, I was surprised by its size. I could imagine natural light flooding the room once it's renovated into an open-concept home. 

The hallway to the back bedrooms was drenched in an ominous blue light.

abandoned detroit tour

When I looked up, I noticed the entire roof was exposed because of a fire, and a blue tarp was covering the gaping hole above my head. As sunlight came through the tarp, it flooded the walkway with blue light.

The back bedrooms were basically shells of former rooms.

abandoned detroit tour

The caution tape that hung throughout the house made it feel like I was walking through a crime scene.

After touring some of the homes for sale, I met up with one woman who bought a home through the Detroit Land Bank Authority.

abandoned detroit tour

Cynthia Reaves runs JGA Property Group, a real-estate development company in Detroit, and decided to buy a two-family home in the Bagley neighborhood through the Land Bank.

In 2019, she bought the house for $52,000 through the auction process but then got a 50% discount because her mother used to work for the city. 

During the auction process, Reaves said she ran into issues.

abandoned detroit tour

Reaves said she feels she was a victim of an investor group trying to bid up the price. She said she doesn't believe the home was worth $52,000.

This is a common complaint Detroiters have about the Land Bank. According to Curbed , many Detroiters have complained they cannot buy the homes they want in the neighborhoods they want through the Land Bank. Some Detroiters say the Land Bank favors out-of-town investors and developers who price gauge the auctions. 

Strickland said this isn't the case. "Seventy-one percent of our buyers are Detroit residents at the time of purchase. 74% are Black, and 64% become homeowners through their Land Bank purchase," she said.

She added, "We're very proud of how these numbers demonstrate that the Land Bank is succeeding in creating accessible pathways to home and property ownership for Detroiters."

Reaves also said the renovation process would be difficult for somebody with little to no experience.

abandoned detroit tour

"There are very few people who can take on these projects and get them done according to the code," Reaves said. "You have to follow the city of Detroit code requirements. You have to follow the permit requirements, and for many individuals, that is a burden." 

Strickland said the Land Bank has developed programs to help with these issues. For instance, they now offer discounts for certain Detroiters, and they have partnered with Home Depot for exclusive discounts to help offset the cost of renovation. Strickland said the compliance department also works closely with home buyers to navigate the tricky permit process. 

After spending $75,000 on renovating and restoring the house, Reaves now rents it out to tenants.

abandoned detroit tour

Reaves charges her two tenants between $1,100 and $1,400 on rent.

"I love it because both of my tenants were so excited to have a house," she said. "They call it their forever home."

Reaves' home is one of more than 4,200 homes purchased through the Detroit Land Bank Authority that are now renovated and occupied.

As I walked through the renovated house, I almost forgot this home was once a dilapidated building.

abandoned detroit tour

Even though Reaves had to outbid an investor group, battle permit problems, and renovate on a tight budget, she was able to turn this formerly dilapidated house into a beautiful home and a great investment that she says ultimately benefits the larger city of Detroit. 

"It's important to the revitalization of the community," Reaves said. 

After touring these homes, I realized the Detroit Land Bank Authority has the power to shape the future of Detroit — if it's done right.

abandoned detroit tour

If the Land Bank continues to offer these abandoned homes to Detroiters and help them through the process, it could help further Detroit's larger revitalization process. 

From the few homes I toured, I could see there's potential in each of them — all that's needed are people who are willing to turn these houses into homes again.

"Detroit is a very vibrant city. There are pockets of beauty and wonderful homes that people can have for reasonable prices. Where else can you buy a brick home for $1,000?" Reaves said. "Come on in. The water's fine."

abandoned detroit tour

  • Main content
  • © Roadtrippers
  • © Mapbox
  • © OpenStreetMap
  • Improve this map

abandoned detroit tour

Detroit's Abandoned Places

  • Featured Trip Guides

Created by MichiganGuides - March 25th 2014

Photo of The Packard Plant

Detroit, MI, US

The Packard Plant

Photo of St. Agnes Church

7601 Rosa Parks Blvd, Detroit, MI, US

St. Agnes Church

Photo of Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church

8501 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI, US

Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church

Photo of Historic King Solomon Baptist Church

6100 14th Street, Detroit, MI, US

Historic King Solomon Baptist Church

Photo of Abandoned Belle Isle Children€™s Zoo

Belle Isle, Detroit, MI, US

Abandoned Belle Isle Children€™s Zoo

Photo of Abandoned Boat Club

1 Riverbank Dr, Detroit, MI, US

Abandoned Boat Club

Photo of Michigan Central Station

2001 15th St, Detroit, MI, US

Michigan Central Station

Photo of Michigan Theater (parking garage)

238 Bagley Ave, Detroit, MI, US

Michigan Theater (parking garage)

Photo of Detroit Public Schools Book Depository (abandoned)

2231 Dalzelle Street, Detroit, MI, US

Detroit Public Schools Book Depository (abandoned)

Photo of United Artists Theater (abandoned)

150 Bagley Street, Detroit, MI, US

United Artists Theater (abandoned)

MichiganGuides

Keep exploring with the roadtrippers mobile apps..

Anything you plan or save automagically syncs with the apps, ready for you to hit the road!

Connect with us and hit up #roadtrippers

Tall tales, trip guides, & the world's weird & wonderful.

  • Roadpass Digital
  • Mobile Apps

Business Tools

  • Partnerships

Get Inspired

  • Road trip ideas by state
  • National parks
  • Famous routes
  • Voices from the Road

Fresh Guides

  • The ultimate guide to Mammoth Cave National Park
  • The Ultimate Guide to Badlands National Park
  • Route 66 Leg 2: St. Louis to Tulsa
  • Route 66 Leg 1: Chicago to St. Louis
  • Route 66 Leg 3: Tulsa to Amarillo
  • Top 10 things to do in Ohio
  • Offbeat Road Trip Guides
  • Road Trip USA
  • Scenic Routes America
  • National Park Road Trips
  • Terms and Conditions

Abandoned Detroit: The Largest Automotive Plant In The World

Detroit's abandoned Packard Automotive Plant has been abandoned since the 1950s, but has attracted some strange attention over the years.

The Packard Automotive Plant in Detroit Michigan is said to be the largest abandoned factory in the world. It is the abandoned plant of the former car manufacturer Packard Motor Car Company and later Studebaker-Packard Corporation.

There is no shortage of abandoned factories and abandoned everything in Detroit. The population of the city has fallen by around two-thirds from its peak. But what is special about the Packard plant is its sheer size. It stands as a somber reminder of what has happened to America's once-prosperous Rustbelt. Detroit is now one of the once-popular American cities that people now avoid .

History of the Packard Automotive Plant

Packard Automotive Plant is located on 40 acres of land on the East Grand Boulevard over on Detroit's east side. When it first opened in 1903 it was considered the most modern car factory in the world and was modern, efficient, and massive (but was destined to get more massive).

  • Opened: 1903
  • Size: 3.5 Million Square Feet
  • Land: Around 40 Acres

By 1908 a further enlargement was announced even though it was already by then six larger when it was first built. At its peak, some 40,000 people were employed here with the factory pumping out automobiles from 1903 to 1956 - excluding the war years.

  • Peak Employment: Employed Around 40,000 People at its Peak
  • Packard: Once A Luxury Car Maker, Failed to Compete In The Age Of The "Big Three"

During World War II, America's economy shifted dramatically to a war footing and the nation's output was in a state of total war. Almost no civilian cars were manufactured during these years.

In the war years, the plant produced war material - particularly the engine Packard V-1650 Merlin used in the iconic North American P-51 Mustang fighter plane.

Related: 20 Once-Popular Tourist Hot Spots That Are Now Eerily Abandoned

Closing And Abandonment

By 1957 Packards were no long assembled here, although a few Studebakers would continue to be produced here for a couple more years. Packard (along with Studebaker) just couldn't make it in the new world order they found themselves in.

The factory complex shut down in 1958, although some other businesses continued to operate on the site and use it was storage until the late 1990s. Some of the outer buildings were continued to be used up to the early 2000s with the last tenant leaving in 2010.

  • Closed: Shuttered In 1956

In the 1990s its ghostly buildings hosted infamous "underground" raves and techno parties.

  • Magnet: It Has Been A Magnet For Raves, Graffiti Artists, Urban Explorers, and Vandals

Since being forsaken, it has proven a magnet for graffiti artists, urban explorers, auto scrappers, and paintballers. In one famous incident vandals even pushed a dump truck off from the fourth floor. As the buildings have been increasingly vandalized, they are getting more and more difficult to be restored (not just here but all over Detroit and the stricken Rust Belt).

Related: Salton City: Intended As A Resort City, Now Inhabited By Ghosts

Failed Plans At Repurposement or Demolition

Still, most of the buildings are reported to be mostly intact and structurally sound and only a few parts of the upper floors in small sections in various buildings have collapsed. A few have been demolished or partly demolished in aborted attempts at demolition over the years.

In 2010 it was reported that the City of Detriot was chasing Mr. Casab to either demolish the complex or hand it over to the city. But in the same article, it was also reported that Mr. Casab was denying having any ownership of the property.

  • Legal Disputes: In 2010 Reports Suggested that There were Legal Disputes As To Who Even Owned the Facility

It was also reported in 2011 that the owners hadn't paid property taxes on the site since 1987.

In 2013 it was announced that AMC's Low Winter Sun would be filmed around there, while Amazon filmed their The Grand Tour first episode of Season 3 there in 2018.

  • Filming Location: Used As A Filming Location For Amazon's The Grand Tour Episode 1, Season 3

In 2019 the bridge over the Grand Boulevard collapsed while a section of the plant owned by the city of Detroit was demolished in the same year.

  • Current Plans: Sell The Complex And Demolish It

A plan for original redevelopment was abandoned in 2020 and it was announced that the property would go up for sale. It is expected that the land will be repurposed and the complex demolished.

So it would seem that if one would like to visit the world's largest abandoned factory, it may be more prudent to go sooner than later (although remember it is private property and trespassing is illegal). But still, given its track record of failed demolishing, it's possible it will be sticking around for a while yet.

If one is looking for a real treat, then visit the abandoned "Dome Home" in Florida now claimed by the sea and an unintended marine refuge.

Next: 10 Abandoned Places Travelers Need To Visit (9 That Might Be Too Much)

Aerosmith relaunches Peace Out farewell tour, will play Detroit in January

abandoned detroit tour

Aerosmith's rebooted farewell tour will bring the iconic rock band to Little Caesars Arena on Jan. 4 for its final Detroit concert.

The Black Crowes remain aboard to open the show, just as they were when the tour was initially announced in May 2023.

Eighteen months after front man Steven Tyler suffered a vocal injury that derailed the band’s much-hyped goodbye outing, Aerosmith has announced its return to the road, starting with a Sept. 20 show in Pittsburgh and wrapping with a Feb. 26 show in Buffalo. 

Aerosmith's Jan. 4 show in Detroit will follow the band's New Year's Eve concert in Boston, where Tyler, guitarist Joe Perry and company formed in 1970 before going on to rise up the rock ranks with a gritty and bluesy sound that produced hits such as “Walk This Way,” “Dream On” and “Sweet Emotion.”

The LCA show, originally scheduled for Sept. 18, 2023, was shifted to January 2024 when Tyler sustained vocal damage early in the tour. Weeks later, the entire farewell run was delayed indefinitely when the singer was diagnosed with a more serious fractured larynx.

Fans who held on to tickets for that original Detroit date are good to go. Any open seats will go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday through Ticketmaster. 

Aerosmith, Peace Out tour schedule

Sept. 20 – Pittsburgh – PPG Paints Arena

Sept. 23 – Philadelphia – Wells Fargo Center

Sept. 26 – Louisville – KFC Yum! Center

Sept. 29 – Cleveland – Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse

Oct. 2 – Charlotte – Spectrum Center

Oct. 5 – Knoxville – Thompson-Boling Arena

Oct. 8 – Washington, D.C. – Capital One Arena

Oct. 11 – Atlanta – State Farm Arena

Oct. 14 – St Louis – Enterprise Center

Oct. 17 – Cincinnati – Heritage Bank Arena

Oct. 20 – Nashville – Bridgestone Arena

Oct. 31 – Phoenix – Footprint Center

Nov. 3 – San Antonio - AT&T Arena

Nov. 6 – Austin – Moody Center

Nov. 9 – Dallas – American Airlines Center

Nov. 12 – Tulsa – BOK Center

Nov. 15 – Omaha – CHI Health Center

Nov. 18 – Denver – Ball Arena

Nov. 21 – Portland, Ore. – Moda Center

Nov. 24 – Seattle – Climate Pledge Arena

Nov. 27 – Salt Lake City – Vivint Arena

Nov. 30 – San Francisco – Chase Center

Dec. 4 – San Jose – SAP Center

Dec. 7 – Los Angeles – The Kia Forum

Dec. 28 – Newark - Prudential Center

Dec. 31 – Boston – TD Garden

Jan. 4 – Detroit – Little Caesars Arena

Jan. 7 – Toronto – Scotiabank Arena

Jan. 10 – Montreal – Bell Centre

Jan. 13 – Columbus – Schottenstein Center

Jan. 16 – Indianapolis – Gainbridge Fieldhouse

Jan. 19 – Chicago – United Center

Jan. 22 – St Paul, Minn. – Xcel Energy Center

Jan. 25 – Kansas City – T-Mobile Center

Feb. 11 – Orlando – Kia Center (NEW SHOW)

Feb. 14 – Tampa – Amalie Arena

Feb. 17 – Sunrise, Fla. – Amerant Bank Arena

Feb. 20 – Raleigh – PNC Arena

Feb. 23 – New York – Madison Square Garden

Feb. 26 – Buffalo – KeyBank Center

Missy Elliott heading to Detroit on first-ever headlining tour

She'll be joined by busta rhymes, ciara and timbaland..

abandoned detroit tour

Legendary rapper, singer and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Missy Elliott will perform at Little Caesars Arena on Aug. 15, promoters announced Monday.

FILE - Missy Elliott performs at the 2019 Essence Festival at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans on July 5, 2019.

She'll be joined by Busta Rhymes, Ciara and Timbaland at the concert, part of her Out of This World Experience tour, the "Get Ur Freak On" artist's first-ever headlining tour. The 24-date tour kicks off July 4 in Vancouver and wraps Aug. 27 in Rosemont, Illinois.

Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday via Ticketmaster. Pre-sales start at 10 a.m. Tuesday.

Elliott was inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2023. She performed at the Palace of Auburn Hills in April 2004 with Beyoncé and Alicia Keys, and she was an opener, along with 50 Cent, when Eminem played Ford Field in July 2003.

[email protected]

  • Grand Rapids/Muskegon
  • Saginaw/Bay City
  • All Michigan

How to find tickets to Aerosmith’s rescheduled ‘Farewell Peace Out Tour’ stop in Detroit

  • Updated: Apr. 16, 2024, 4:35 p.m. |
  • Published: Apr. 16, 2024, 3:22 p.m.

abandoned detroit tour

Aerosmith's “Peace Out Farewell Tour” with special guest The Black Crowes, to perform January 4, 2025 at Little Caesars Arena. Image provided by: Vividseats

Boston rockers Aeromsmith will now bring their “Peace Out Farewell Tour” to Detroit with special guest The Black Crowes, January 4, 2025 at Little Caesars Arena.

Get tickets now at Stubhub, Vividseats, SeatGeek and Ticketmaster.

The show was set for Sept. 18, 2023, but was rescheduled to January after lead singer Steven Tyler suffered vocal cord damage.

“The Peace Out Farewell Tour” also stops in Chicago, Cleveland, Indiana and Toronto. Tickets are available at Stubhub, Vividseats, SeatGeek and Ticketmaster.

Ticket prices range from $105 to $1,326. Act fast. Ticket prices will fluctuate.

The Black Crowes will open the shows.

All previously purchased tickets will be honored for the rescheduled shows. Ticketholders will receive more information via email.

Aerosmith, once heralded as the American version of the Rolling Stones, released their 44-Song Greatest Hits Collection Aug. 18. The exclusive compilation spans the entirety of the band’s career and includes classic rock favorites “Dream On,” “Walk This Way,” “Sweet Emotion,” “Crazy,” and many more.

Aerosmith has sold more than 150 million albums over the years including the first Aerosmith “Greatest Hits” album released in 1980, which sold over 12 million copies in the U.S.

Get your tickets for the “Peace Out Farewell Tour” at Stubhub, Vividseats, SeatGeek and Ticketmaster.

Detroit - Saturday January 4, 2025 (Rescheduled from 9/18/2023)

Ticketmaster

Toronto - Tuesday, January 7, 2025, 7:00pm, (Rescheduled from 9/12/2023, 2/21), Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, CA

Columbus - Monday January 13, 2025, 7:00pm, (Rescheduled from 1/23/2024), Value City Arena at Schottenstein Center, Columbus, OH

Indianapolis - Thursday, January 16, 2025, 7:00pm, (Rescheduled from 10/29/2023), Gainbridge Fieldhouse, Indianapolis, IN

Chicago - Sunday, January 19, 2025, 7:00pm, (Rescheduled from 9/15/2023, 2/14/2024), United Center, Chicago, IL

If you purchase a product or register for an account through a link on our site, we may receive compensation. By using this site, you consent to our User Agreement and agree that your clicks, interactions, and personal information may be collected, recorded, and/or stored by us and social media and other third-party partners in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

  • Live In The D
  • Newsletters

Supreme Court gives some military veterans more generous educational benefits

Associated Press

Copyright 2023 The Associated Press. All rights reserved

FILE - The Supreme Court of the United States is seen in Washington, March 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades, File)

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with a decorated veteran of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq in a protracted fight with the government over 12 months of G.I. Bill educational benefits.

The court ruled 7-2 that the Department of Veterans Affairs improperly calculated the educational benefits for James Rudisill, a retired Army captain who lives in northern Virginia.

Recommended Videos

Rudisill, who's now an FBI agent, is in a category of veterans who earned credit under two versions of the G.I. Bill. One version applied to people who served before the Sept. 11, 2001, attack. Congress passed new legislation after Sept. 11.

But Rudisill served both before and after the attack, including tours in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Each program gives veterans 36 months of benefits, and there's a 48-month cap. Rudisill thought he had 10 months of benefits remaining under the old program, plus another year in the new system. But the VA denied the additional year.

Rudisill said the decision forced him to give up his plan to attend Yale Divinity School, be ordained as an Episcopal priest and reenter the Army as a chaplain.

His lawyers said the decision could affect roughly 1.7 million veterans, but the VA disputed that the number is “anything close” to 1.7 million, noting that his lawyers didn't identify any other cases that presented the same issue.

Follow the AP's coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court at https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court .

Copyright 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Click here to take a moment and familiarize yourself with our Community Guidelines.

IMAGES

  1. Abandoned Detroit Photography Tour is an Eyeopener

    abandoned detroit tour

  2. 7 Incredible Abandoned Buildings In Detroit

    abandoned detroit tour

  3. A Visual Tour Through Detroit's Historical Ruins

    abandoned detroit tour

  4. Detroit's Iconic Abandoned United Artist Theater

    abandoned detroit tour

  5. A Tour of Abandoned Houses in Detroit » TwistedSifter

    abandoned detroit tour

  6. Detroit's Abandoned Ruins Are Captivating, But Are They Bad For

    abandoned detroit tour

VIDEO

  1. Abandoned Detroit Home #abandoned #detroit #shorts

  2. Abandoned Detroit Homes #abandoned #detroit #shorts

  3. Abandoned Detroit Home #abandoned #detroit #timelapse #exploring

  4. Detroit abandoned house pt290 #usa #reels #abandoned #detroit

  5. Detroit abandoned house pt495 #abandoned #usa #reels

  6. Detroit abandoned house pt366 #abandoned #usa #detroit #reels

COMMENTS

  1. 10 Abandoned Places In Detroit

    1. Packard Automotive Plant: A Symbol of Detroit's Decline. credit - www.autonews.com. You can't help but feel a sense of melancholy as you explore the decaying ruins of the Packard Automotive Plant, once a bustling symbol of Detroit's industrial might.

  2. After Being Abandoned, Here's Where Detroit Stands Today

    Detroit's decline began in the 1940s with job losses, leading to a 65% population decrease by 2020. Michigan is now home to thriving suburbs away from the city, contributing to Detroit's decline. Despite its decline, Detroit is on a journey towards revitalization, with new investments and infrastructure improvement.

  3. Detroit Buildings

    Introduction. Detroit, known as the Motor City and the birthplace of Motown, is a city drenched in both history and decay. Despite its rich heritage and vibrant past, many of its iconic buildings now stand abandoned, hinting at a faded glory. These abandoned structures serve as reminders of the rise and fall of Detroit and have become a magnet ...

  4. 7 Incredible Abandoned Buildings In Detroit

    This abandoned automotive plant is noteworthy based on sheer size: it's one of the largest abandoned buildings in the world, spanning over 40 acres. Between 1903 and 1911, it was a cutting-edge auto production facility, and it remains a relic of the automotive industry that earned Detroit the Motor City nickname.

  5. Abandoned Detroit

    The city of Detroit, in the U.S. state of Michigan, has gone through a major economic and demographic decline in recent decades. The population of the city has fallen from a high of 1,850,000 in 1950 to 677,116 in 2015, kicking it off the top 20 of US cities by population for the first time since 1850.

  6. You Can Explore These Abandoned Buildings In Detroit

    8. Fisher Body Plant 21. The Fisher Body Plant 21, located at 6051 Hastings St, Detroit, MI, was built in 1919 on Piquette Street in Detroit to meet the growing demands of the auto industry. The plant served to turn out Buick and Cadillac bodies and focused on the stamping process of the build.

  7. A Visual Tour Through Detroit's Historical Ruins

    A Visual Tour Through Detroit's Historical Ruins. Ioanna Sakellaraki 11 July 2017. Detroit, the famous Motor City, has experienced one of the most significant declines in population and industry across America. Between 2000 and 2010, the city lost 25% of its population, with its ranking dropping from the 10th down to the 18th largest city in ...

  8. Highly Recommended Tour of Detroit Ruins

    Motor City Photography Workshops: Highly Recommended Tour of Detroit Ruins - See 88 traveler reviews, 56 candid photos, and great deals for Detroit, MI, at Tripadvisor.

  9. Forgotten Detroit

    Forgotten Detroitwww.forgottendetroit.com. Forgotten Detroit. Detroit is known for one of the most stunning collections of pre-depression architecture in the world. The past two decades have seen several of these treasures sit vacant, waiting for economic revival. On these pages you will find information about the past, present, and future ...

  10. Detroiturbex.com

    Detroit: Now and Then, an interactive look at the history of Detroit. Explore the past, present, and future of the city of Detroit through it's landmarks and lesser-known abandoned buildings on Detroiturbex.com.

  11. 42 Staggering Photos Of Abandoned Detroit Today

    42 Staggering Photos Of Abandoned Detroit Buildings. By Savannah Cox. Published September 20, 2013. Updated November 7, 2023. The Motor City has officially run out of gas. And as evidenced by these photos, it was not just industry that abandoned Detroit; it was its livelihood. As of July 18, 2013, the Motor City officially ran out of gas.

  12. Detroit Buildings

    The architectural marvels now lay in ruin, covered in graffiti, a shamble of their original glory. We spent a long weekend in Detroit touring the abandoned buildings. As much as we like to explore on our own, I wanted to take a local tour because some of the buildings we wanted to view are in less than desirable locations; secondly, we are not ...

  13. 10 Best Detroit Tours

    4. Detroit Urban Exploration and Photography Tour Source: viator.com Detroit Urban Exploration And Photography Tour Population decline in Detroit has left many of the suburbs full of desolate ruins. Though this initially left the city in crisis, many of these abandoned sites have become tourist attractions.

  14. Motor City Photography Workshops

    Open now. 7:00 AM - 12:00 AM. Write a review. See all photos. About. Motor City Photography Workshops offer tours exploring abandoned buildings in Detroit as well as non-abandoned tours of Detroit. If you are looking for someone who knows Detroit and its abandoned locations, you will be hard pressed to find anyone else who has the experience ...

  15. 9 Places In Abandoned Detroit That Are Haunting

    3. Fisher Body Plant 21. Fisher Body Plant 21, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. Mike Boening Photography/Flickr. The Fisher Body Plant 21 is just one of the many abandoned automobile plants in Detroit. The glass and concrete building was built in 1919 by Albert Kahn and shut down in 1984.

  16. Detroit's Abandoned Ruins Are Captivating, But Are They Bad For

    In a Detroit News report about the task force, Jon George, founder and president of Motor City Blight Busters, described blight as "a cancer" -- if you don't stop it, it spreads. His nonprofit renovates houses and tears down abandoned ones. Despite large swaths of vacant land, many buildings are being developed, and the city's downtown is full ...

  17. 16 abandoned buildings in Detroit that need to be redeveloped

    The lodge is yet another building owned by the Ilitches, which bought it in 2007 for $1.5 million. The company did some cosmetic work to the facade in 2013, and teased the public with possible ...

  18. 6 Stunning Detroit Locations Every Urbex Photographer Should Shoot

    6 Stunning Detroit Locations Every Urbex Photographer Should Shoot. Urban Exploration Photography (urbex for short) is the art of finding old and abandoned buildings and locations, exploring them, and shooting pictures. It has been a passion of mine for quite some time and can be very exciting, perhaps due to the potential of danger at every turn.

  19. Covering 10 Crazy Abandoned Places in Detroit For 2023

    Detroit's population, at its peak in 1950 with 1,850,000 residents, came crashing down to just 680,000 residents in 2015. In the wake of these drastic changes, Detroit left behind a trail of economic blight and abandoned places. Discovering Abandoned Places in Detroit. This makes Detroit an ideal spot for an urbex adventure.

  20. See Inside 3 Abandoned Detroit Homes up for Auction for $1,000

    Jul 1, 2021, 7:30 AM PDT. One of the abandoned homes in Detroit. Frank Olito/ Insider. I toured three abandoned homes that are up for auction through the Detroit Land Bank Authority. The three ...

  21. Detroit's Iconic Abandoned United Artist Theater

    Detroit's Iconic Abandoned United Artist Theater. November 21, 2022. The United Artists Theater. 150 Bagley Street. Detroit, Michigan. Long before downtown Detroit had made its now storied comeback, the United Artists Theater was just one of many abandoned, neglected, and wide open buildings scattered throughout downtown. But years before that ...

  22. Detroit's Abandoned Places

    Anything you plan or save automagically syncs with the apps, ready for you to hit the road! Connect with us and hit up #roadtrippers. Tall tales, trip guides, & the world's weird & wonderful. Detroit's Abandoned Places road trip makes stops at The Packard Plant, St. Agnes Church, Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church and others.

  23. Abandoned Detroit: The Largest Automotive Plant In The World

    Published Jan 13, 2022. Detroit's abandoned Packard Automotive Plant has been abandoned since the 1950s, but has attracted some strange attention over the years. The Packard Automotive Plant in Detroit Michigan is said to be the largest abandoned factory in the world. It is the abandoned plant of the former car manufacturer Packard Motor Car ...

  24. Ticketmaster

    Ticketmaster

  25. Aerosmith relaunches farewell tour, will play Detroit in January

    Aerosmith relaunches Peace Out farewell tour, will play Detroit in January. Aerosmith's rebooted farewell tour will bring the iconic rock band to Little Caesars Arena on Jan. 4 for its final ...

  26. Laura Quattrocchi transforms lottery tickets into thought-provoking

    Laura Quattrocchi transforms lottery tickets into thought-provoking sculptures for 'The Loser Show'. The tragic yet comedic interactive exhibition is displayed at Andy Arts on Detroit's west ...

  27. Missy Elliott heading to Detroit on first-ever headlining tour

    She'll be joined by Busta Rhymes, Ciara and Timbaland at the concert, part of her Out of This World Experience tour, the "Get Ur Freak On" artist's first-ever headlining tour. The 24-date tour ...

  28. How to find tickets to Aerosmith's rescheduled 'Farewell ...

    Anneice Coady | [email protected]. Boston rockers Aeromsmith will now bring their "Peace Out Farewell Tour" to Detroit with special guest The Black Crowes, January 4, 2025 at Little Caesars ...

  29. Supreme Court gives some military veterans more ...

    If you need help with the Public File, call (313) 222-0566.