Why are flights canceled today? Here's what to know if you're flying from Phoenix

hurricane lee air travel impact

Severe weather conditions with the threat of flooding are disrupting air travel in the Northeast.

While Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport hasn't had a large number of delays and cancellations in recent days, flights to and from the Northeast are among those affected, according to the flight tracking website FlightAware .

American Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines all offered travel waivers for passengers who have flights booked during the hazardous weather associated with Hurricane Lee . Flyers should check their airline's policy for details, as the terms for each one is different.

Here's what to know if you're flying to the Northeast.

New restaurants at Sky Harbor: Everything that just opened in Terminal 4

Why are flights canceled today?

Severe weather in the northeast U.S. affected flights in the New York City, Boston, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., regions in recent days.

Here's how it affected flights in Phoenix, according to FlightAware data:

Sept. 8: Two arriving flights from and one departing flight to Newark, New Jersey, were canceled. Five Phoenix-Newark flights experienced delays.

Sept. 9: All but three of Sky Harbor's 18 canceled flights were arriving from or departing to the Northeast. The region was responsible for all six of Sky Harbor's canceled arriving flights, plus nine out of Sky Harbor's 12 canceled departures. Flights to and from Newark led the cancelations with six, followed by Philadelphia with five. Most Northeast cities also experienced several delayed arrivals and departures.

Sept. 10: Sky Harbor had four canceled flights associated with the Northeast weather: an arrival from and departure to Baltimore, one Phoenix-Philadelphia flight and one Phoenix-Newark flight.

Sept. 11: As of 11 a.m., no flights between Phoenix and the Northeast were canceled, though Boston, Baltimore and Newark each had one delayed departure from Sky Harbor.

What can travelers do if their flight is canceled or delayed?

Check with your airline to see if you can reschedule your trip.

American , Southwest and United issued travel alerts for the Northeast that allow passengers to rebook without additional charges if they had travel scheduled during a certain time and can travel within the coming days in their original class of service and the original city pairs.

Know your options: Flight canceled or delayed? Here's how to rebook or get a refund

Reach the reporter at  [email protected] . Follow him on X, formerly Twitter:  @salerno_phx .

Support local journalism.  Subscribe to  azcentral.com  today.

  • Skip to main content
  • Keyboard shortcuts for audio player

Lee is a hurricane now and will be a 'major' storm soon — with 155 mph winds or more

Russell Lewis

Russell Lewis

hurricane lee air travel impact

This National Hurricane Center graphic, produced at 10 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2023, shows the projected path and strengthening of Hurricane Lee as it moves across the Atlantic Ocean. Credit: NOAA/National Hurricane Center hide caption

This National Hurricane Center graphic, produced at 10 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2023, shows the projected path and strengthening of Hurricane Lee as it moves across the Atlantic Ocean.

Lee has strengthened into a hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean and forecasters say it's expected to grow rapidly into a major hurricane by this weekend.

In its last advisory , the National Hurricane Center said Lee has winds of 80 mph and is moving toward the Leeward Islands. Forecasters are already using stark language about the storm and its prospects.

"It is becoming a question of when and not if rapid intensification occurs with Lee," the advisory noted. Winds are forecast to reach 155 mph which is a high-end Category 4 'major hurricane' with the possibility of "explosive intensification."

Photos: See the aftermath of Hurricane Idalia

The Picture Show

Photos: see the aftermath of hurricane idalia.

Hurricane Lee strengthens to a Category 5 storm as it approaches the Caribbean

Hurricane Lee is rapidly intensifying, and it's forecast to be a Category 5 storm

This already is a 15 mph increase from the NHC's initial advisory on Tuesday. The reason for the higher wind speed is the above-average water temperatures in the area of the Atlantic the storm is churning through. "The system should be moving over record-warm waters ... east of the Lesser Antilles." Forecasters say those kinds of water temperatures are what they typically see in the Gulf of Mexico — not in the much cooler ocean.

This forecast — so far out in the Atlantic — with a prediction of strengthening this quickly is unusual . Still, it's too early to say with any certainty exactly where this storm will go.

Vast majority of tracks for eventual Major Hurricane Lee are clustered into a "recurve" scenario well away from the U.S. East Coast. However, there are indeed some outliers that have a mind of their own. Until the rest join the outliers or the whole envelope of solutions drifts… pic.twitter.com/1I8eLYnO5t — Ryan Maue (@RyanMaue) September 5, 2023

Most of the long-range models have Lee eventually curving north - missing the Caribbean and remaining offshore of the United States. While models are generally accurate, they're not perfect. Hurricane Irma , in 2017, was supposed to follow a similar path - but instead walloped the Gulf coast of Florida.

Even if Lee misses land, forecasters say swells generated by Lee "are expected to reach portions of the Lesser Antilles on Friday, and the British and U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico this weekend. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions."

Lee is the the 13th named storm of what is an above-average Atlantic hurricane season. As researcher Phil Klotzbach notes, only "4 other years on record have had 13+ Atlantic named storms by Sept. 5: 2005, 2011, 2012, 2020."

  • Tropical Storm Lee
  • 2023 Atlantic Hurricane Season
  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Lee Moves North After Landfall in Western Nova Scotia

Tropical storm warnings were canceled on Sunday, as the storm continued to weaken, but the weather had left many without power in Maine and Nova Scotia.

A satellite view of the North Atlantic showing Hurricane Lee approaching the east coast of the United States and Canada

By Judson Jones

Judson Jones is a meteorologist and reporter for The Times.

Lee made landfall in Nova Scotia on Saturday afternoon as a post-tropical cyclone after transitioning from a hurricane and slightly weakening earlier in the day. The storm produced winds near hurricane-force as it reached shore, forecasters from the National Hurricane Center said, and it caused tropical storm conditions along the province and coastal Massachusetts.

All tropical storm warnings related to Lee were discontinued as of late Sunday morning.

The storm meant New England was expected to experience weather similar to what occurs during a nor’easter, said Andrew Loconto, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Boston. During nor’easters, which typically occur in late fall and through the winter months, large waves crash ashore and often flood some coastal roads.

The diminished storm produced strong tropical-storm-force winds that extended far from its epicenter and reached the coastline.

On Sunday night, there about 2,400 customers in Maine had no power, according to PowerOutage.us . In Nova Scotia, about 23,700 customers were without power, according to Nova Scotia Power , a utility company.

Here are three things to know about Lee.

Lee made landfall on Long Island, Nova Scotia, late Saturday afternoon, the National Hurricane Center said . Maximum sustained winds on Sunday morning were near 45 m.p.h. with higher gusts, which could still cause downed trees and power outages.

Lee will continue to gradually weaken over the next several days and is expected to entirely dissipate on Tuesday, the Hurricane Center said on Sunday.

Tropical storm-force winds were extending 290 miles off the storm’s center on Sunday morning, still creating dangerous surf along Atlantic Canada and the East Coast.

Video player loading

As of 11 a.m. on Sunday, Lee was about 135 miles west-northwest of Port Aux Basques in Newfoundland, Canada, and was moving northeast at 22 m.ph.

When a hurricane becomes post-tropical.

As the storm headed north over cooler water, Lee transitioned from a hurricane to a post-tropical cyclone on Saturday. Tropical systems like hurricanes get their energy from warm ocean temperatures and their cores expel that energy upward into the atmosphere.

A typical storm system that moves across the United States will get energy from competing air masses of cooler and warmer air. When forecasters say that a storm has transitioned to post-tropical, it has morphed into a more typical storm system with warm and cold fronts.

This process typically weakens a storm and expands how far the damaging winds stretch.

Arrival times and likelihood of damaging winds

Tropical-storm speeds or greater.

Reporting was contributed by Sydney Cromwell , Johnny Diaz , Melina Delkic , Amanda Holpuch , Mike Ives , Orlando Mayorquin , Anastasia Marks , Eduardo Medina , Chris Stanford , John Yoon and Derrick Bryson Taylor .

Judson Jones is a meteorologist and reporter for The Times, covering extreme weather around the world. More about Judson Jones

Explore Our Weather Coverage

Extreme Weather Maps: Track the possibility of extreme weather in the places that are important to you .

Blizzard or Nor’easter?: What’s the difference between these storms? How do you stay safe in either? Here’s what to know .

Tornado Alerts: A tornado warning demands instant action. Here’s what to do if one comes your way .

On the Road:  Safety experts shared some advice  on how snow-stranded drivers caught in a snowstorm can keep warm and collected. Their top tip? Be prepared.

Climate Change: What’s causing global warming? How can we fix it? Our F.A.Q. tackles your climate questions big and small .

Evacuating Pets: When disaster strikes, household pets’ lives are among the most vulnerable. You can avoid the worst by planning ahead .

Hurricane Lee restrengthens to Category 3. Here’s what’s next.

The storm rapidly intensified, then rapidly weakened, and is strengthening yet again.

hurricane lee air travel impact

Hurricane Lee has taken meteorologists for a wild ride. On Thursday, it was barely a hurricane. By Friday, it had blown up into a Category 5, becoming the third-most rapidly intensifying storm ever observed in the Atlantic Ocean. Then it weakened equally quickly. Now, it’s strengthening yet again and has regained major hurricane status as a Category 3. Its peak winds leaped Sunday from 105 to 120 mph, and it is forecast to intensify back to a Category 4 on Monday.

While the forecast for where Lee might end up is uncertain, the risk of a direct hit to the Canadian Maritimes around next weekend is increasing. There’s a slight risk that the northeastern United States could face a close shave as Lee whirls nearby or just offshore.

It’s barely a week until the historic peak of hurricane season in the Atlantic, which falls in mid-September. By October, fewer storms form over the open Atlantic as stronger upper-level winds become more hostile to storm development. Instead, the threat shifts to “homegrown” tropical systems — those that form in the Gulf of Mexico or in the Caribbean Sea.

Heading into the 2023 Atlantic hurricane season, experts predicted that record-warm ocean waters would tip the scales toward an anomalously active season. That’s been the case to date, and there’s no reason to expect the ocean basin to simmer down anytime soon.

A first: Category 5 storms have formed in every ocean basin this year

Where is Hurricane Lee and how strong is it?

As of Sunday at 5 p.m., Lee was centered about 285 miles north-northeast of the Northern Leeward Islands and was moving west-northwest at 8 mph. Winds were estimated at 120 mph.

Lee’s increase in strength was tied to the following:

  • “Hot towers,” or tall thunderstorms, were orbiting Lee’s center or “eye,” which was becoming better defined.
  • Hostile wind shear — or changing winds with altitude which disrupt thunderstorm development — had eased.
  • The air pressure inside Lee had decreased. That meant a more powerful vortex and stronger inward suction, increasing winds.
  • A new eyewall or ring of intense thunderstorms around the storm center was apparent on microwave infrared imagery, which is a special satellite product that allows meteorologists to peer “under the hood” at Lee’s inner structure.

Where is Lee likely to hit?

Lee is going to continue drifting west-northwest. In coming days, it will make a turn to the north, but where exactly it makes that turn remains to be seen.

The storm will be steered north between two weather systems spinning in opposite directions. Over the open Atlantic, a blocking high pressure “ridge” is spinning clockwise. Over the eastern United States, a counterclockwise-spinning “trough” of low pressure will be present. Lee should be shuttled between them and scooped north, but uncertainties in the projected strengths and positions of both steering systems mean we don’t know yet how close to the East Coast the storm will track.

If the track shifts eastward, Bermuda could be in play, too, for at least a fringing, or possibly more direct effects. That would be in the Wednesday-to-Thursday time frame.

New England — especially eastern New England and Downeast Maine — should keep tabs on the system, particularly late this week into the weekend. At least one run of the European model depicted a direct hit to Cape Cod, but that is an outlier scenario.

The most likely scenario still calls for a hit in the Canadian Maritimes. By then, Lee would probably be a nontropical storm but would be just as strong as a hurricane. With a broader wind field, significant surge would be possible, in addition to wind and flooding rains.

Regardless of where Lee heads, the eastern coastline of North America, as well as the Northern Leeward Islands, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Turks and Caicos, and the Bahamas, can expect rough surf and dangerous rip currents.

When might Hurricane Lee make landfall?

The majority of weather models keep Lee’s center offshore of the United States. Assuming it does make landfall in the Canadian Maritimes, it would be in about seven to eight days.

How strong will Lee get?

Lee is projected to become a Category 4 on Monday and remain that intense on Tuesday before slowly weakening as it moves over cooler waters during the second half of the week.

How strong will Lee be when it nears land?

When Lee passes Bermuda, it will probably be a Category 1 or low-end Category 2 storm. Fortunately, it should remain just offshore, sparing Bermuda any direct hit, though tropical storm conditions are possible.

By next weekend, the most likely scenario, though teeming with uncertainty, is for Lee to be a strong Category 1 — or perhaps Category 2-equivalent storm — as it approaches Canada’s maritime provinces. It’s not clear whether it will be fully tropical, but it’s very probable that Lee’s winds will reach farther from the storm’s center. That could bring tropical storm conditions to a much wider swath of coastline.

What do computer models project for Lee?

We can look at a “spaghetti ensemble” plot that captures the range of possibilities with Lee. Darker shadings represent areas with more overlapping possible tracks — meaning a higher likelihood that Lee goes there. Less likely scenarios are in a lighter shading.

What has made Lee stand out?

#Lee 's life story, Chapter 1: From African easterly wave to sudden extreme intensification into a Category 5 #hurricane (wait for it) pic.twitter.com/1EWakTRkBe — Stu Ostro (@StuOstro) September 8, 2023
  • Lee was the first Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic this season. Since 2016, there have been seven others. One of them, Michael, made a U.S. landfall at Category 5 strength on Oct. 10, 2018.
  • Lee also became the farthest southeast storm to achieve Category 5 status on record in the Atlantic.
  • Moreover, Lee’s rapid intensification — spiking from an 80 mph Category 1 to an extreme 160 mph Category 5 in 24 hours — made it the most rapidly intensifying Atlantic storm on record outside the Caribbean, and the third-most swiftly strengthening Atlantic storm on record overall. Rapid intensification, while common with major hurricanes, is made more likely by the effects of human-induced climate change.

Are there any other Atlantic storms to worry about?

Elsewhere in the Atlantic, Tropical Storm Margot is midway between the coasts of South America and Africa. It had 50 mph winds early Sunday. On satellite, one could note that the bulk of the thunderstorms were located north-northeast of the low-level swirl, meaning the storm is vertically misaligned. That’s due to changing winds with height in the atmosphere known as “shear.” So long as shear is present, Margot will struggle to strengthen.

It will probably curve north-northwest and become a hurricane in coming days. By Thursday, it should be passing over the open ocean midway between Bermuda and the Azores.

How is this hurricane season stacking up?

Fourteen named storms have formed so far this season, including four hurricanes, three of which became major hurricanes. Activity perked up quickly in mid-August, with Franklin becoming a Category 4 over the open Atlantic and Idalia doing so over the Gulf of Mexico. Idalia eventually struck the Florida Big Bend as a high-end Category 2 or a low-end Category 3, then quickly weakened inland.

In terms of the number of systems, we’ve had more than is typical. Fourteen is sort of normal for an entire season, and we’ve already reached that at the midpoint. On average, a season’s fourth hurricane happens by mid-September, so we’re right on schedule there. That said, only three per year on average become major, and the average date of a season’s third major hurricane is Oct. 28 — meaning we are far outpacing what’s usual when it comes to forming major hurricanes.

hurricane lee air travel impact

hurricane lee air travel impact

Hurricane Lee's Latest Projected Path to Impact Travel in New England, Canada

A s Hurricane Lee brings tropical storm conditions as it passes by Bermuda on Thursday, the National Hurricane Center is projecting the storm will impact eastern New England and Atlantic Canada by the weekend.

According to Weather.com , Hurricane Lee is a Category 1 storm making waves due to its massive size, with tropical storm-force winds extending 310 miles from the center. Wind gusts in Bermuda have been reported at around 50 miles per hour.

Tracking north, hurricane watches have been issued from Stonington, Maine, to Point Lepreau, New Brunswick, while tropical storm warnings have been issued for the coast of Massachusetts from Woods Hole to Hull, including Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket.

A tropical storm watch is in effect for much of the rest of New England, including Watch Hill, Rhode Island, to Woods Hole, Massachusetts; Block Island; and from Hull, Massachusetts, to Stonington, Maine, according to WCVB.com .

Eastern New England and Atlantic Canada are preparing for high winds, heavy rain and coastal flooding that are likely to arrive Friday night before intensifying throughout Saturday, but exact details won’t be available until the path of Lee becomes clearer.

Several top airlines in the United States—including American, Delta and JetBlue—have already issued travel waivers for flights to and from Bermuda impacted by Hurricane Lee. JetBlue was the first carrier to waive change fees for travelers heading to or from Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket.

Cruise lines altered itineraries this week as Hurricane Lee moved through the Atlantic, including Carnival Cruise Line, Disney Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Royal Caribbean International.

Royal Caribbean also announced that its latest Jewel of the Seas voyage spend the day in Manhattan instead of Halifax on September 16, with more cruise lines serving the region expected to make changes if necessary.

For the latest travel news, updates and deals, subscribe to the daily TravelPulse newsletter .

Blurred image of the passenger aircraft.

The importance of storytelling in fighting climate change

In a webinar on April 19, we'll explore how climate organizations are currently using storytelling in their work, the impacts of these stories, and lessons learned from other movements.

Knowledge is power

hurricane lee air travel impact

Stay in the know about climate impacts and solutions. Subscribe to our newsletters.

  • Eye on the Storm News
  • Weekly News from Yale Climate Connections

Stay in the know about climate impacts and solutions. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter.

By clicking submit, you agree to share your email address with the site owner and Mailchimp to receive emails from the site owner. Use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt out at any time.

Yale Climate Connections

Yale Climate Connections

Hurricane Lee slows and reorganizes

Bob Henson

Share this:

  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on X (Opens in new window)

Hurricane Lee and Tropical Storm Margot, 9/11/23

Hurricane Lee continued to churn in the western North Atlantic on Monday, slowing down as it prepares to make a long-anticipated turn likely to bring it near Atlantic Canada or New England by this weekend. Regardless of any potential landfall, Lee will push immense amounts of water toward the U.S. East Coast later this week, causing widespread swells, rough surf, rip currents, and beach erosion.

Large waves will spread outward from Hurricane #Lee causing dangerous beach conditions and the possibility for coastal erosion along the U.S. eastern seaboard this week pic.twitter.com/0fl9usNkWi — Dr. Levi Cowan (@TropicalTidbits) September 11, 2023

As of 11 a.m. EDT Monday , Lee was a Category 3 hurricane with top sustained winds of 120 mph, centered about 400 miles north-northeast of Puerto Rico. Lee’s structure had improved since Sunday, but the hurricane was still plagued with moderate wind shear and intrusions of dry air that have limited its reorganization. Moreover, reconnaissance flights on Monday morning found that Lee had concentric eyewalls, which will likely lead to another eyewall replacement cycle (EWRC) and make it more difficult for the hurricane’s inner core to strengthen dramatically.

Instead of intensifying, #Lee has begun another EWRC. Not going to be much of a window to strengthen after this given upwelling concerns pic.twitter.com/knYPXWjehN — Alex Boreham (@cyclonicwx) September 11, 2023

Some gradual intensification is possible as wind shear relaxes somewhat and Lee continues to pass over very warm waters (30 degrees Celsius or 86 degrees Fahrenheit) with ample deep-ocean heat content. The National Hurricane Center predicted that Lee would briefly hit minimal Category 4 strength on Tuesday.

As Lee moves slowly northwest, swells and rough surf can be expected today and Tuesday on north-facing shores of the Greater Antilles, gradually working their way into the Bahamas and Bermuda. Lee will stay far enough north that there is a less than 5 percent chance of tropical-storm-force winds reaching Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Track forecast for Lee

The large-scale outlook for Lee’s movement has changed very little over the past several days. By midweek, Lee will be rounding the southwest side of a large ridge of high pressure in the North Atlantic and will begin to feel the influence of an upper trough over eastern North America. Forecast models are in firm agreement that these factors will induce a fairly sharp northward turn around Wednesday, and a gradual northward acceleration through the rest of the week.

hurricane lee air travel impact

The exact location and timing of Lee’s midweek turn are still difficult to predict, and these will influence how far west or east Lee is positioned as it accelerates northward. The precise interaction of the ridge and trough at higher latitudes will also shape Lee’s trajectory. There is sustained and increasing agreement among models that Lee will pass to the west of Bermuda (which NHC gave a 43% chance of experiencing tropical storm-force winds) and head toward Atlantic Canada – most likely Nova Scotia and New Brunswick – but the track could still veer far enough west to reach New England, or far enough east to make an initial landfall in Newfoundland. The 11 a.m. Monday five-day forecast cone extended to Nantucket Island in far southeast Massachusetts, and we can expect other parts of New England and Atlantic Canada to enter the cone over the next couple of days. NHC gave Nantucket a 19% chance of experiencing tropical storm-force winds by 8 a.m. EDT Saturday.

Not surprisingly, #Lee will be undergoing extratropical transition as it nears New England/Atlantic Canada this weekend. The core will be gone, but we could see gale force winds or stronger over a very wide area, even if the center doesn't make a direct impact. pic.twitter.com/cHGYnfRU4t — Andy Hazelton (@AndyHazelton) September 11, 2023

Intensity forecast for Lee

Monday and Tuesday will likely mark Lee’s second and final peak of intensity after the hurricane briefly hit Category 5 strength on Friday. As it heads northwest, Lee will be moving over cooler waters churned up by the recent passage of Hurricanes Franklin and Idalia. Wind shear will increase by late week as well, and by Friday Lee will be crossing the Gulf Stream and approaching much cooler waters to its north. Lee is predicted by NHC to weaken to Category 1 strength by Friday.

As it moves north, Lee will also enlarge, its winds weakening but spreading over a much larger area. The expanded wind field will help drive the widespread effects of high surf throughout the U.S. East Coast and into Atlantic Canada.

Margot near hurricane strength, but no threat to land

As of  11 a.m. Monday,  Tropical Storm Margot was located in the remote central Atlantic, about 1,245 miles northwest of the Cabo Verde Islands, headed north at 10 mph. Margot’s top sustained winds were 70 mph, and  satellite images  showed that the storm was near hurricane strength, with a prominent eye.

Sep 11, 11 AM EDT | Peak seas associated with Tropical Storm #Margot are around 21 ft near the center. Elsewhere, seas are between 8 to 12 ft. Over the next 24 hours Margot will likely intensify, therefore peak seas near the center will increase to around 29 ft. pic.twitter.com/s6gKmR37sI — NHC_TAFB (@NHC_TAFB) September 11, 2023

Margot is predicted to peak as a Category 1 hurricane with 90 mph winds on Wednesday, then slowly weaken. Margot is not a threat to any land areas this week, but the Azores Islands may need to be concerned about the storm next week.

A new African wave has the potential to develop

A tropical wave newly-emerged from the coast of Africa (Invest 98L) is generating disorganized heavy thunderstorms along the coast of Africa. The wave is expected to move west to west-northwest at 15-20 mph, and merge later this week with another tropical disturbance (Invest 97L) located just west of the Cabo Verde Islands. This combined system may develop over the central tropical Atlantic late this week, according to the GFS and European models and many of their ensemble members.

Models/ensembles continue to suggest another MDR TC will form by this weekend, from a combo of #97L and a wave coming off. A lot of spread depending on where something consolidates, but pretty solid signal that a weakness in the ridge will allow it to turn NW before the islands. pic.twitter.com/pdnDxafi24 — Andy Hazelton (@AndyHazelton) September 11, 2023

In their 2 p.m. EDT Monday Tropical Weather Outlook, NHC gave this system 2-day and 7-day odds of development of 0% and 60%, respectively. Long-range forecasts currently show that this wave is likely to take a more northwesterly track later in the week, making it unlikely to pass through the Lesser Antilles Islands (see Tweet above), though a subsequent westward turn cannot be ruled out. The next name on the Atlantic list of storms is Nigel.

hurricane lee air travel impact

Catastrophic flooding in Libya from Medicane Daniel; thousands of deaths feared

As this post was finalized, reports were accumulating of what may be one of the worst weather disasters in modern African history. Torrential rains and catastrophic floods have affected multiple locations in Libya. The worst-hit location appears to be the port city of Derna on the Mediterannean coast (population around 90,000), where at least two confirmed dam failures led to severe flooding. The prime minister of eastern Libya said in an interview that at least 2,000 people are feared dead in the Derna area, according to the Egyptian news site Ahram and the Associated Press . At least 37 flood-related deaths have been confirmed elsewhere in Libya.

Some pretty extreme flooding in #Derna , Libya due after Mediterranean storm Daniel. Made a rough annotation to show possible damage based off early visuals. According to the Associated Press, as many as 2,000 are feared dead in eastern Libya. https://t.co/CbEjvaovPZ pic.twitter.com/A3WqeMQquN — Jake Godin (@JakeGodin) September 11, 2023

The rains were produced by a storm that began as an upper-level low in southeast Europe, causing extreme rains and flooding in Greece and Turkey. As the low, named Daniel, moved southward over the warm waters of the Mediterranean, it evolved into a medicane (Mediterranean tropical-like cyclone) and continued into Libya on Saturday.

Full timelapse of Storm #Daniel ⛈️ Daniel brought devastating flooding to central Greece as the system stalled in the Mediterranean Sea. When the system finally moved south, it strengthened into a Medicane tropical-like system before landfalling near Benghazi, Libya. pic.twitter.com/nCs0icxua3 — Zoom Earth (@zoom_earth) September 10, 2023

Website visitors can comment on “Eye on the Storm” posts (see comments policy below). Sign up to receive notices of new postings  here .

Bob Henson is a meteorologist and journalist based in Boulder, Colorado. He has written on weather and climate for the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Weather Underground, and many freelance... More by Bob Henson

Jeff Masters

Jeff Masters, Ph.D., worked as a hurricane scientist with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. After a near-fatal flight into category 5 Hurricane Hugo, he left the Hurricane Hunters to pursue a... More by Jeff Masters

hurricane lee air travel impact

Watch CBS News

Hurricane Lee's path and timeline: Meteorologists project when and where the storm will hit

By Kerry Breen

Updated on: September 16, 2023 / 4:55 PM EDT / CBS News

Update: Lee made landfall in Canada.

Former  Hurricane Lee  was lashing New England and southeastern Canada on Saturday after it became a post-tropical cyclone. Watches and warnings are up for the coastal areas of Maine, New Hampshire and the Canadian Maritime Provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

Lee's effects were already being felt along the southeast U.S. coastline, and forecasters said Lee would make its presence felt with "hazardous surf and rip current conditions" at beaches along the western Atlantic all week.

Lee rapidly intensified over the  Atlantic Ocean's very warm waters  late last week, swelling into a powerful  Category 5  hurricane before its wind speeds started to decline. 

Where is Lee heading?

As of 2 p.m. EDT on Saturday, Lee had maximum sustained winds of 70 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane-force winds were extending up to 140 miles from the center of Lee and tropical-storm-force winds were extending up to 390 miles from the center. The center of the storm was about 80 miles south-southeast of Eastport, Maine, and about 150 miles west-southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia, according to the hurricane center. Lee was moving north at 22 mph.

A map from the National Hurricane Center shows the probable path for the center of Post-Tropical Cyclone Lee as of 2 p.m. EDT on Sept. 16, 2023.

"The center of Lee is forecast to make landfall in Atlantic Canada later this afternoon," the hurricane center wrote. "Lee is then expected to turn toward the northeast and move across Atlantic Canada tonight and Sunday."

A hurricane watch is in effect for parts of southeastern Canada.

A tropical storm warning was in effect from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, north to the U.S.-Canada border and parts of southeastern Canada.

  • How do hurricanes get their names? A look at the naming process and 2023's full list of storms

Where will Lee make landfall?

According to the hurricane center, Lee is expected to make landfall in southeastern Canada on Saturday.

CBS Boston meteorologists reported  Friday with "high confidence" that the center of Lee is expected to pass about 200 miles east of southern New England Saturday morning, likely as a minimal Category 1 hurricane, transitioning to an extra-tropical, nor'easter-type storm.

President Biden issued an emergency declaration for the state of Maine late Thursday, ahead of the Lee's arrival, that will free up resources from the Federal Emergency Management Agency "to coordinate all disaster relief efforts."  

Will Hurricane Lee hit Massachusetts?

Lee is expected to move up the coast of Massachusetts without making landfall in the state — but coastal areas will feel the effects of the storm.

CBS Boston reported the "greatest impact will be felt on the Lower and Outer Cape and on Nantucket."  

"If you live on the Cape of Massachusetts or Maine, keep a close eye on Lee as we head into the weekend," Weather Channel meteorologist Stephane Abrams said Tuesday on "CBS Mornings." 

"The exact positioning of the storm and level of impacts we'll see in the U.S. will be determined in part by high pressure off to the east and a trough off to the west," she said. "If Lee ends up farther west, we could have stronger winds, heavier rain, larger swells and coastal flooding. If it slides more east, the impacts would be less intense."

Inland areas, away from the coast, are expected to see very little rain and just some gusty wind, the station reported.

Will Hurricane Lee hit New York?

New York is not expected to take a direct hit, but  CBS New York reports Long Island shore towns are preparing for potential effects from the storm. High surf, dangerous rip currents and beach erosion are likely to be the biggest threats there.

"We've had crews for the last week, and they will be out all weekend long securing these waterways, building up these areas to try and preserve our beaches," Hempstead Town Supervisor Don Clavin told the station.

Gov. Kathy Hochul also deployed 50 National Guard members to Long Island to help prepare for the storm. 

Hurricane Lee spaghetti models

Spaghetti weather models, or spaghetti plots, are computer models showing the possible paths a storm may take as it develops. These models don't predict the impact or when a storm may hit,  according to the Weather Channel , but focus on showing which areas might potentially be at risk. 

Spaghetti models for Hurricane Lee mostly showed the storm traveling over the Atlantic as it heads northward, closing the gap near northern New England. A  spaghetti model for Lee created Tuesday, seen below, showed most projected paths skirting along the U.S. coast at least up to New England, with a potential impact along the northern New England coast or Canadian Maritimes late this week.

A spaghetti model showing the potential paths of Hurricane Lee

Another set was posted by The Weather Channel's Jim Cantore Monday, who wrote : "Recent trends from model guidance have brought #Lee back west enough so that it has put southeastern New England in the NHC track cone. It should be noted that track guidance can error by hundreds of miles for this time out 5-6 days. That said, Lee will likely be an expanding…"

Recent trends from model guidance have brought #Lee back west enough so that it has put southeastern New England in the NHC track cone. It should be noted that track guidance can error by hundreds of miles for this time out 5-6 days. That said, Lee will likely be an expanding… pic.twitter.com/YkZknVxB3b — Jim Cantore (@JimCantore) September 12, 2023

What are the hurricane category wind speeds?

Hurricanes are rated on the  Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale , which includes five categories based on the storm's sustained wind speeds. Here is a look at how the categories break down and how the National Hurricane Center describes the potential level of damage such storms can cause if they make landfall:

Category 1:  Sustained wind speed of 74-95 mph      "Very dangerous winds will produce some damage"

Category 2: Sustained wind speed of 96-110 mph      "Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage"

Category 3: Sustained wind speed of 111-129 mph       "Devastating damage will occur"

Category 4:  Sustained wind speed of 130-156 mph       "Catastrophic damage will occur"

Category 5: Sustained wind speed of 157 mph or higher        "Catastrophic damage will occur"

Any storm of Category 3 or higher is considered a "major hurricane" with the potential for "significant loss of life and damage."

  • Atlantic Hurricane Season
  • Tropical Storm
  • Hurricane Lee
  • Atlantic Ocean

Kerry Breen

Kerry Breen is a reporter and news editor at CBSNews.com. A graduate of New York University's Arthur L. Carter School of Journalism, she previously worked at NBC News' TODAY Digital. She covers current events, breaking news and issues including substance use.

More from CBS News

Canada at risk of another catastrophic wildfire season, government warns

Thousands evacuated as spring meltwater floods parts of western Russia

Italian mayor giving away goats that are taking over island

Stanford's Tara VanDerveer, NCAA's all-time winningest basketball coach, retires

NECN

Hurricane Lee remains a major hurricane – here's what this means for New England

Lee will not impact land for the next several days, which is certainly good news. however, land interaction can serve another purpose and help shear the storm apart, by tevin wooten • published september 8, 2023 • updated on september 8, 2023 at 8:00 pm.

Major Hurricane Lee continues to remain in rare company as a major Category 4 hurricane. Friday morning, its winds were 165 mph. While we may have seen the storm at its maximum intensity, it will remain a major hurricane for several days.

Lee marks the third Category 4 hurricane of the 2023 Atlantic season. Both Hurricanes Idalia and Franklin were Category 4 at one point during their lifespan. Despite a small drop in the storm’s winds, the storm remains powerful.

hurricane lee air travel impact

Between Wednesday and Thursday, the storm underwent rapid intensification twice times over. Rapid intensification refers to a storm’s windspeed increasing by 35 mph in 24 hours. Hurricane Lee intensified by 80 mph in that time span. Only six other hurricanes have accomplished that feat: Wilma (2005), Felix (2007), Ike (2008), Matthew (2016), Maria (2017) and Eta (2020).

Get New England news, weather forecasts and entertainment stories to your inbox. Sign up for NECN newsletters.

Lee will not impact land for the next several days, which is certainly good news. However, land interaction can serve another purpose and help shear the storm apart. There’s less friction over the ocean and it keeps the storm intact.

In the short term, Hurricane Lee moves due north of Bermuda, still as a major Category 4 hurricane. Its forward motion will slow over the weekend. It will still be over an abnormally warm ocean too, so that will allow the storm to maintain its strength.

Most long-range models keep Hurricane Lee over the ocean, and doesn’t make a landfall. Swells will impact northeastern Florida and southeastern Georgia this weekend and early next week. And it’s very likely New England sees similar coastal impacts too.

Weather Stories

hurricane lee air travel impact

Impacts, timeline for this week's big storm. Here's what we know

hurricane lee air travel impact

Next storm to bring heavy rain, isolated lightning and thunder, strong winds

Beyond that, it’s far too soon to say with certainty to what extent direct impacts, if any, to the New England coast will be.

We are watching the storm slow down considerably over the southwestern Atlantic, which will mean multiple things in the coming days.

hurricane lee air travel impact

I do believe if —and that’s a big if—we were to get substantial impacts, this buys us time to prepare. We’re in the peak of hurricane season this week, so a firm plan of action for island and coastal communities should well be established at this point. This is the ready stage…of ready, set, go.

The second thing we will see play out as the storm slows, is the turn northward. That turn northward will be generated by upper-level wind energy. The storm will still be over the Caribbean and southwestern Atlantic even by next Tuesday, so time will be in our favor to get other steering parameters in the region.

This can be likened to a football team’s offensive depth chart. We know we have several starting quarterbacks who have both gotten QB1 reps…we’ve got three or four willing and able wide receivers and tight ends…but who starts on gameday will depend on how the week goes with practice, if everyone stays injury-free.

What will guide the offense, or in this case our storm, is an area of high pressure over Bermuda and an incoming area of low pressure embedded in the upper jet stream. How strong, or weak, these features are will work in tandem to bring Lee northward.

hurricane lee air travel impact

The current path and model consensus has the storm splitting the uprights, and going between Bermuda and the East Coast of the US. Ultimately this wouldn’t be a bad thing for New England. We’d likely get enough wind energy to bring strong swells and rip currents, but it’s fairly limited to that, similar to how Idalia churned up coastal waters of New England.

hurricane lee air travel impact

This would be a better setup for the East Coast. A stronger, and larger, area of low pressure would drive the jet east. That would act as a wall and force Lee, in whatever form it's in, to the east, lessening the blow.

hurricane lee air travel impact

A stronger Bermuda high pressure system would do the inverse, and guide Lee more westward to the New England coast. While not likely, it’s still a very plausible option. This still doesn’t yield a direct hit. The area of high pressure would need to be persistent in maintaining its large form, or else Lee would have open room to then wobble back west.

Ultimately movement of these storms is like steering a large ship. Most of these turns are so subtle, they aren’t even realized until after they’ve already happened.

We are at the statistical peak of hurricane season, and the season is far from over. The First Alert weather team will continue to monitor this storm and any other tropical threat as they develop.

This article tagged under:

hurricane lee air travel impact

hurricane lee air travel impact

Hurricane Lee  is now a powerful Category 5 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 165 mph.

And it is expected to grow even stronger, with winds of 180 mph within the next 12 hours, according to the  National Hurricane Center .

A Category 5 hurricane has maximum sustained winds of at least 157 mph. There is no Category 6 hurricane.

➤  Track all active storms

While it's too soon to know what impact Lee will have on Florida or the U.S., the National Hurricane Center said dangerous surf and rip currents are expected along most of the United States' East Coast beginning Sunday.

By 11 p.m. Thursday, Hurricane Lee had intensified by 80 mph over the past 24 hours. Only six Atlantic hurricanes since records have been kept have intensified by 80-plus hours within that time period: Wilma in 2005; Felix in 2007; Ike in 2008; Matthew in 2016; Maria in 2017 and Eta in 2020.

Farther east in the Atlantic is  Tropical Storm Margot,  which is expected to become a hurricane over the weekend.

What impact will Hurricane Lee have on North Carolina?

It is still early to know what impact Lee will have on North Carolina.

"Most models turn Lee northward, but that doesn’t happen 'til mid-next week," tweeted the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network.

"This means at least small changes to the ultimate track are likely. So the U.S. east coast should prep for potential impacts. Never hurts to be ready!"

"Building seas and long period swells from Major Hurricane Lee over the west Atlantic are forecast to lead to deteriorating boating conditions over the coastal waters, and increase the threat of life-threatening rip currents and beach erosion through all of next week," said the  National Weather Service, Melbourne.

AccuWeather  forecasters said impacts from Lee could be felt from the Caribbean to the United States and as far north as Atlantic Canada.

"At the very least, a  significant risk of dangerous rip currents  is expected along the East Coast," said AccuWeather.

Monster in the making: Hurricane season forecast: Lee breaks record before it's even born

AccuWeather forecasters said there are still several track scenarios from the middle of next week through next weekend. The timing of when Lee takes a turn to the north will be the main factor in determining the exact impacts along the East Coast.

Many of the models indicate the hurricane is likely to head northward in the Atlantic, but not all. Any  bump westward in the track could be disastrous  for the Atlantic Coast anywhere from Florida to Nova Scotia, AccuWeather said.

As Lee approaches, the jet stream could determine the extent of the direct impacts in the United States. Based on the projected track, direct impacts such as heavy rain and high winds from Lee are not expected from Florida to the Carolinas. However, it could be a different story farther to the north, especially across New England, forecasters said.

If the jet stream swings eastward, it should help to protect all of the East Coast from feeling direct rain and high winds from Lee. In this scenario, Bermuda may endure more direct impacts instead.

However, if the jet stream is stronger, dips southward and stalls as Hurricane Lee approaches, the powerful storm  could be pulled in close to the U.S.  by steering winds during the middle and latter part of next week.

"Right now, the area in the United States that really needs to pay attention includes locations from the upper part of the mid-Atlantic coast to New England," AccuWeather Chief Broadcast Meteorologist Bernie Rayno said.

Weather models show a deep trough of low pressure over the eastern U.S. next week, and that dip in the jet stream "should turn Lee more to the north around this time next week," said Ryan Truchelut,  chief meteorologist at Florida-based Weather Tiger .

What does Jim Cantore have to say about Hurricane Lee?

"Is eastern North America in play? Absolutely, but its very likely we won't have some confidence for some tighter goal posts until next week. Regardless  #Lee  will be a dangerous and powerful hurricane as it decides its fate on North America," The Weather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore tweeted.

Looking at models of Hurricane Lee into next week, Cantore tweeted:

"Some solutions into late next week (shown below) are too close to ignore. Some don't touch land. This is all common with something in the 7-10 day away range. Plus the simple fact that track errors go up rapidly after 5 days which would be this case for Lee, Any POTENTIAL USA direct impacts other than waves would likely be late next week at the earliest."

"Even though almost all of the ensemble blend members don't touch the USA, its all about the trends at this point versus actual individual operational model output," Cantore said.

"Therefore, lets watch how the some of these western players shake out. The farther west we go the harder it is to miss eastern North America. There is no reason to believe  #Lee  will weaken considerably over the next week."

Here's the latest update from the NHC as of  5 a.m. Friday:  

Hurricane Lee Category 5 storm and growing even stronger

Special note on the NHC cone:  The forecast track shows the most likely path of the center of the storm. It does not illustrate the full width of the storm or its impacts, and the center of the storm is likely to travel outside the cone up to 33% of the time. 

  • Location : 630 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands
  • Maximum sustained winds : 165 mph
  • Movement : west-northwest at 14 mph

Spaghetti models for Hurricane Lee

At 5 a.m., the center of Hurricane Lee was located 630 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands. For those tracking the storm, it's near latitude 17.8 North, longitude 53.5 West.

Lee is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph, and this motion is expected to continue through early next week with a significant decrease in forward speed.

On the forecast track, Lee is expected to pass well to the north of the northern Leeward Islands, theVirgin Islands, and Puerto Rico over the weekend and into early next week.

Maximum sustained winds based on data from the Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft have increased to near 165 mph, with higher gusts.

Lee is a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Additional strengthening isforecast today. Fluctuations in intensity are likely over the next few days, but Lee is expected to remain a major hurricane through early next week.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140 miles.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 926 mb.

Hurricane Lee winds up to 165 and expected to hit 180 mph in 12 hours

Prediction and timing of winds :

  • 12 hours:  180 mph
  • 24 hours:  175 mph
  • 36 hours:  165 mph
  • 48 hours:  165 mph
  • 60 hours:  160 mph
  • 72 hours : 155 mph
  • 96 hours:  150 mph
  • 120 hours : 140 mph

A Category 5 hurricane has maximum sustained winds of at least 157 mph

Special note about spaghetti models: Illustrations include an array of forecast tools and models, and not all are created equal. The hurricane center uses only the top four or five highest performing models to help make its forecasts. 

The National Hurricane Center said there is increasing confidence the core of Lee will pass to the north of the northern Leeward Islands.

Tropical Storm Margot

  • Location : 460 miles west-northwest of Cabo Verde Islands
  • Maximum sustained winds : 40 mph
  • Direction : west-northwest at 16 mph

At 5 a.m., the center of Tropical Storm Margot was located 460 miles west-northwest of Cabo Verde Islands. Margot is moving toward the west-northwest near 16 mph. This general motion is expected to continue through the weekend, followed by a turn toward the northwest early next week.

Maximum sustained winds remain near 40 mph, with higher gusts. Gradual strengthening is expected during the next few days, and Margot is forecast to become a hurricane over the weekend.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from the center.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 1004 mb.

Weather watches and warnings issued in North Carolina

North Carolina Weather Alerts - Warnings, Watches and Advisories

When is the Atlantic hurricane season?

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

When is the peak of hurricane season?

The peak of the season is Sept. 10, with the most activity happening between mid-August and mid-October, according to the Hurricane Center.

Tropical forecast over the next seven days

Excessive rainfall forecast, what's out there.

Systems currently being monitored by the National Hurricane Center.

What's next? 

We will continue to update our tropical weather coverage daily. Download your local site's app to ensure you're always connected to the news. And look at our  special subscription offers here . 

Airlines struggle with lack of planes as summer travel set to hit record levels

  • Medium Text

Tourists visit Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome

LEASING MARKET BOOMS

Make sense of the latest ESG trends affecting companies and governments with the Reuters Sustainable Switch newsletter. Sign up here.

Reporting by Rajesh Kumar Singh in Chicago Editing by Matthew Lewis

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. New Tab , opens new tab

Airbus logo at the Airbus facility in Saint-Nazaire

Business Chevron

Pedestrian walks past car traffic in Beijing

China's Q1 GDP growth set to slow to 4.6%, keeps pressure for more stimulus- Reuters poll

China's economy likely grew 4.6% in the first quarter from a year earlier - the slowest in a year despite tentative signs of steadying, a Reuters poll showed on Thursday, maintaining pressure on policymakers to unveil more stimulus measures.

Illustration shows Japanese Yen and U.S. dollar banknotes

IMAGES

  1. NOAA'S GOES-16 Satellite Imagery of Hurricane Lee Sept. 26th

    hurricane lee air travel impact

  2. Tropical Storm Lee forms in the Atlantic

    hurricane lee air travel impact

  3. NASA finds Hurricane Lee's strength shift

    hurricane lee air travel impact

  4. Hurricane Lee Becomes Fifth Major Storm of Season

    hurricane lee air travel impact

  5. Hurricane Lee forecast to impact Northeast U.S.A., Canada

    hurricane lee air travel impact

  6. Hurricane Lee Becomes Fifth Major Storm of Season

    hurricane lee air travel impact

COMMENTS

  1. Why are flights canceled today? How Hurricane Lee affects airlines

    Severe weather in the northeast U.S. affected flights in the New York City, Boston, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., regions in recent days. Here's how it affected flights in Phoenix, according ...

  2. Flights canceled and cruise itineraries changed as Lee reaches New

    Lee made landfall in Canada on Saturday as a post-tropical cyclone, bringing heavy rainfall, powerful winds and storm surge to parts of New England and southeastern Canada. Some flights and ...

  3. Hurricane Lee on Track to Disrupt Travel

    Hurricane Lee weakened slightly on Friday but remains a powerful Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph as it tracks westward about 550 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands. For now, it's still early to know if and where Lee could make landfall in the Caribbean and mainland U.S. UPDATE: Friday, September 8 at 8:15 a.m. ET.

  4. Powerful Hurricane Lee will create hazardous conditions along the East

    Hurricane Lee remains hundreds of miles east of the Caribbean late Saturday, yet forecasters say the storm's effects may have an impact on the US Atlantic seaboard as early as this weekend.. Lee ...

  5. Tracking Post-Tropical Cyclone Lee

    By William B. Davis , Madison Dong , Judson Jones , John Keefe and Bea Malsky Sep. 5, 2023. Lee was a post-tropical cyclone in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence with sustained wind speeds of 45 miles per ...

  6. Hurricane Lee could become 'extremely dangerous'

    Hurricane Idalia destroyed homes and powerlines in Florida just days ago. Hurricane Lee is expected to intensify into an "extremely dangerous" category four storm by the weekend, says the US ...

  7. Hurricane Lee expected to become an 'extremely dangerous ...

    Lee is a hurricane now and will be a 'major' storm soon — with 155 mph winds or more. This National Hurricane Center graphic, produced at 10 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2023, shows the ...

  8. Lee Moves North After Landfall in Western Nova Scotia

    Tropical storm-force winds were extending 290 miles off the storm's center on Sunday morning, still creating dangerous surf along Atlantic Canada and the East Coast. As of 11 a.m. on Sunday, Lee ...

  9. Hurricane Lee rapidly strengthens to Category 5 storm as it ...

    CNN —. Hurricane Lee has strengthened into a major Category 5 storm, packing maximum sustained wind speeds of 160 mph as it spins over the Atlantic well east of the Caribbean, the National ...

  10. What to know about Hurricane Lee's forecast, strength, expected

    Lee was the first Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic this season. Since 2016, there have been seven others. One of them, Michael, made a U.S. landfall at Category 5 strength on Oct. 10, 2018.

  11. Hurricane Lee's Latest Projected Path to Impact Travel in New ...

    A s Hurricane Lee brings tropical storm conditions as it passes by Bermuda on Thursday, the National Hurricane Center is projecting the storm will impact eastern New England and Atlantic Canada by ...

  12. Hurricane Lee continues churn towards east coast of US and Canada

    A massive hurricane churning in the Atlantic Ocean is set to impact the east coast of the US and Canada this weekend, according to forecasters. Hurricane Lee turned north on Wednesday and is ...

  13. Hurricane Lee's path is still unclear, but the East Coast could see

    Lee hit a rare strength that few storms have ever achieved. Only 2% of storms in the Atlantic reach Category 5 strength, according to NOAA's hurricane database.

  14. Hurricane Lee slows and reorganizes » Yale Climate Connections

    As of 11 a.m. EDT Monday, Lee was a Category 3 hurricane with top sustained winds of 120 mph, centered about 400 miles north-northeast of Puerto Rico.Lee's structure had improved since Sunday, but the hurricane was still plagued with moderate wind shear and intrusions of dry air that have limited its reorganization.

  15. Hurricane Lee's path and timeline: Meteorologists project when and

    A map from the National Hurricane Center shows the probable path for the center of Post-Tropical Cyclone Lee as of 2 p.m. EDT on Sept. 16, 2023. National Hurricane Center

  16. Hurricane Lee could still have an impact on the NC coast. Here's the

    As Hurricane Lee begins to travel north Wednesday through Friday, seas will get bigger, peaking at 7 to 10 feet on the southern coast and up to 11 feet going north. Hurricane Lee is expected to turn to the north sometime Wednesday, staying well off the North Carolina coast, but the Category 3 storm will cause rough seas and dangerous rip ...

  17. Hurricane Lee's potential impact on Boston, New England

    Lee marks the third Category 4 hurricane of the 2023 Atlantic season. Both Hurricanes Idalia and Franklin were Category 4 at one point during their lifespan. Despite a small drop in the storm's ...

  18. A significantly larger Hurricane Lee will keep growing as it races

    Hurricane Lee grew even larger on Tuesday and triggered a tropical storm watch for Bermuda as the cyclone's potential impacts begin to come into focus for the island and beyond. Lee, a Category ...

  19. Path of Hurricane Lee and possible Canadian impacts becoming clearer

    September 11, 2023 · 8 min read. Path of Hurricane Lee and possible Canadian impacts becoming clearer. Hurricane Lee regained its major storm status Monday as its future path became a little more clear, raising concerns over potential impacts to Atlantic Canada by the weekend. However, several scenarios are still on the table right now, and ...

  20. Hurricane Lee strengthening. Will it impact coastal North Carolina?

    Maximum sustained winds based on data from the Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft have increased to near 165 mph, with higher gusts. Lee is a Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson ...

  21. Hurricane Lee: Storm to 'grow in size,' decrease intensity as it

    The Canadian Hurricane Centre says Hurricane Lee is now on its anticipated northward course toward Canada's Maritime provinces and the state of Maine.. As of 3 p.m. Wednesday, the storm was ...

  22. Airlines struggle with lack of planes as summer travel set to hit

    At the same time, the number of travelers globally is set to hit historic levels, with 4.7 billion people expected to travel in 2024 compared with 4.5 billion in 2019. "We can expect a strong ...

  23. Searing heat is back across Southeast Asia and it's not going away

    Lee reached Category 5, but then weakened slightly to Category 4 as it expected to be a dangerous storm as it moves over the southwest Atlantic. It is too early to know if it will directly affect ...