Travel, Tourism & Hospitality

Travel and tourism in the Dominican Republic – statistics & facts

Cruise tourism, key insights.

Detailed statistics

Hospitality GDP in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Tax revenue from tourism in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Tourism employment in the Dominican Republic 2019-2022

Editor’s Picks Current statistics on this topic

Current statistics on this topic.

Hotel occupancy in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Inbound tourism volume in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022, by transport mode

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Recommended statistics

  • Premium Statistic Tourism revenue in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022
  • Basic Statistic Tourism employment in the Dominican Republic 2019-2022
  • Premium Statistic Tourism development in the Dominican Republic 2019-2021
  • Premium Statistic Tourism development in the Dominican Republic 2021, by pillar
  • Premium Statistic Hotel occupancy in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Tourism revenue in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Revenue of the tourism sector in the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2022 (in billion U.S. dollars)

Number of travel and tourism jobs in the Dominican Republic from 2019 to 2022 (in 1,000s)

Tourism development in the Dominican Republic 2019-2021

Travel & Tourism Development Index (TTDI) in the Dominican Republic in 2019 and 2021

Tourism development in the Dominican Republic 2021, by pillar

Travel & Tourism Development Index (TTDI) in the Dominican Republic in 2021, by pillar

Occupancy rate of hotels and similar establishments in the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2022

International tourism

  • Premium Statistic Inbound air travelers in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022, by residence status
  • Premium Statistic Travel spending of inbound visitors in the Dominican Republic 2010-2021, by purpose
  • Premium Statistic Per capita daily spend of inbound visitors in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022
  • Premium Statistic Air departures by residents of the Dominican Republic 2010-2022, by type
  • Premium Statistic Outbound tourism spending of Dominican travelers 2010-2021, by main category
  • Premium Statistic Per capita outbound tourism spending in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Inbound air travelers in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022, by residence status

Number of international air passengers in the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2022, by residence status (in 1,000s)

Travel spending of inbound visitors in the Dominican Republic 2010-2021, by purpose

Travel expenditure of international tourists in the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2021, by travel purpose (in million U.S. dollars)

Per capita daily spend of inbound visitors in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Average daily expenditure of international tourists in the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2022 (in U.S. dollars)

Air departures by residents of the Dominican Republic 2010-2022, by type

Number of air passenger departures by residents in the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2022, by type (in 1,000s)

Outbound tourism spending of Dominican travelers 2010-2021, by main category

Expenditure of international tourists from the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2021, by main category (in million U.S. dollars)

Per capita outbound tourism spending in the Dominican Republic 2010-2022

Average expenditure per trip by international travelers from the Dominican Republic from 2010 to 2022 (in U.S. dollars)

  • Premium Statistic Inbound cruise travelers in the Dominican Republic 2019-2022, by port
  • Premium Statistic Yachts and cruise ships arriving in the Dominican Republic 2018-2022
  • Premium Statistic Average cruise traveler spend per person in the Dominican Republic 2012-2022
  • Premium Statistic Most visited protected natural zones in the Dominican Republic 2022
  • Basic Statistic Category scores for the Dominican Republic's Gay Travel Index 2023

Inbound cruise travelers in the Dominican Republic 2019-2022, by port

Number of cruise passengers arriving in the Dominican Republic from 2019 to 2022, by port (in 1,000s)

Yachts and cruise ships arriving in the Dominican Republic 2018-2022

Number of yacht and cruise ship calls in the Dominican Republic from 2018 to 2022

Average cruise traveler spend per person in the Dominican Republic 2012-2022

Average per capita expenditure of cruise passengers in the Dominican Republic from 2012 to 2022 (in U.S. dollars)

Most visited protected natural zones in the Dominican Republic 2022

Leading conservation areas in the Dominican Republic in 2nd quarter 2022, by number of visitors

Category scores for the Dominican Republic's Gay Travel Index 2023

Gay Travel Index in the Dominican Republic in 2023, by category

  • Premium Statistic Portfolio of selected hotel groups in the Dominican Republic 2023
  • Premium Statistic Main air carriers in the Dominican Republic 2022, by international passenger traffic
  • Premium Statistic Most admired travel agencies in the Dominican Republic 2021
  • Premium Statistic Most admired touristic real estate companies in the Dominican Republic 2021
  • Premium Statistic Most admired food delivery companies in the Dominican Republic 2021

Portfolio of selected hotel groups in the Dominican Republic 2023

Number of hotels of selected companies in the Dominican Republic as of October 2023

Main air carriers in the Dominican Republic 2022, by international passenger traffic

Leading international airlines in the Dominican Republic in 2022, based on number of passengers (in 1,000s)

Most admired travel agencies in the Dominican Republic 2021

Leading travel agencies in the Dominican Republic in 2021, based on admiration index

Most admired touristic real estate companies in the Dominican Republic 2021

Leading companies developing touristic real estate projects in the Dominican Republic in 2021, based on admiration index

Most admired food delivery companies in the Dominican Republic 2021

Leading companies in the food delivery industry in the Dominican Republic in 2021, based on admiration index

Opinions and preferences

  • Premium Statistic Reasons why foreign tourists visited the Dominican Republic 2022
  • Premium Statistic Main promoters of tourism in the Dominican Republic 2022
  • Premium Statistic Quality of Dominican tourism services according to foreign visitors 2022
  • Premium Statistic Price evaluation of tourism services by visitors in the Dominican Republic 2022

Reasons why foreign tourists visited the Dominican Republic 2022

Main reasons for international visitors to have chosen the Dominican Republic as a destination in 2022

Main promoters of tourism in the Dominican Republic 2022

Channels through which international tourists discovered the Dominican Republic as a destination in 2022

Quality of Dominican tourism services according to foreign visitors 2022

Evaluation by international tourists of the quality of tourism services in the Dominican Republic in 2022

Price evaluation of tourism services by visitors in the Dominican Republic 2022

Evaluation of tourism service prices by international tourists in the Dominican Republic in 2022

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Dominican Republic

dominican republic tourism facts

  • 1.1 History
  • 1.2 Climate
  • 1.3 Landscape
  • 1.4 Visitor information
  • 4 Other destinations
  • 5.1 By plane
  • 5.2 By boat
  • 6.2 Guaguas (local buses)
  • 6.3 Long-haul buses
  • 9.1 National parks
  • 10.2 Shopping
  • 15.1 Volunteer
  • 16 Stay safe
  • 17 Stay healthy
  • 19.1 By phone
  • 20 External Links

The Dominican Republic ( Spanish : República Dominicana ) is a Caribbean country that occupies the eastern half of the island of Hispaniola , which it shares with Haiti . Besides white sand beaches and mountain landscapes, the country is home to the oldest European city in the Americas, now part of Santo Domingo . Due to its Hispanic heritage, the Dominican Republic is called the Cradle of the Americas.

Understand [ edit ]

History [ edit ].

Explored and claimed by Columbus on his first voyage on December 5, 1492, the island of Ayití, named by Columbus as La Hispaniola, became a springboard for Spanish conquest of the Caribbean and the American mainland.

The island was first inhabited by the Taínos and Caribes. The Caribes were an Arawakan-speaking people who had arrived around 10,000 BCE. Within a few short years following the arrival of European explorers, the population of Tainos had significantly been reduced by the Spanish conquerors. Based on Fray Bartolomé de las Casas (Tratado de las Indias) between 1492 and 1498 the Spanish conquerors killed around 100,000 Taínos.

dominican republic tourism facts

The first European settlement founded on the American continent was on La Isabela, founded in 1493 using a 15th-century style in La Isabela, Puerto Plata (19°53'15.08" N 71°04'48.41" W). The City of Santo Domingo was founded by Bartolomé Colón, on August 5, 1496 and was moved by Frey Nicolás de Ovando to the west side of Ozama river in 1502.

In 1606 the royal crown of Spain ordered the depopulation of the western end of the island due to high piracy and contraband. This led to the French invasion and the establishment of Haiti .

In 1697, Spain recognized French dominion over the western third of the island, which in 1804 became Haiti. The remainder of the island, by then known as Santo Domingo, sought to gain its own independence in 1821, but was conquered and ruled by the Haitians for 22 years; it finally attained independence as the Dominican Republic in 1844.

A legacy of unsettled, mostly non-representative rule for much of its subsequent history was brought to an end in 1966 when Joaquín Balaguer was elected president for his second, non-consecutive term (he had first served from 1960-1962). He maintained a tight grip on power for most of the next 30 years, until international reaction to flawed elections forced him to curtail his last term, hold new elections in 1996, and give up power. Since then, regular competitive elections have been held every four years.

The Dominican economy has had one of the fastest growth rates in the hemisphere.

Climate [ edit ]

Tropical maritime with little seasonal temperature variation. There is a seasonal variation in rainfall. The island lies in the middle of the hurricane belt and is subject to severe storms from June to October. It experiences occasional flooding and periodic droughts.

Landscape [ edit ]

Rugged highlands and mountains with fertile valleys interspersed.

Visitor information [ edit ]

  • Go DR tourism website

Regions [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

Cities [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

  • 18.476389 -69.893333 1 Santo Domingo — the capital city and the oldest European city in the Americas
  • 18.425 -69.424167 2 Juan Dolio — a luxury apartment resort with beaches, yacht harbours, golf courses
  • 19.795833 -70.694444 3 Puerto Plata — a popular resort destination known for its pretty sandy beaches
  • 18.558611 -68.369444 4 Punta Cana — home to a coastline of sandy white beaches at the eastern tip of the
  • 18.457222 -69.306111 5 San Pedro de Macoris — a sugarcane, baseball, university and tourist city
  • 19.205278 -69.336389 6 Santa Barbara De Samana — a cute harbor town on the Samaná Peninsula
  • 19.45 -70.7 7 Santiago de los Caballeros — a city of old and classic Caribbean Spanish-style buildings
  • 19.749444 -70.517222 8 Sosua — a party destination for single men
  • 18.43 -68.97 9 La Romana — 3rd largest city it has a charming replica of the Italian village

Other destinations [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

  • 18.366667 -68.833333 1 Bayahibe
  • 18.933333 -70.4 2 Bonao —secluded village
  • 19.749167 -70.410556 3 Cabarete
  • 19.119722 -70.638333 4 Jarabacoa
  • 19.32 -69.53 5 Las Terrenas
  • 19.3 -69.2 6 Las Galeras
  • 18.98 -69.05 7 Miches
  • 17.86214 -71.64557 8 Bahia de las Aguilas
  • Playa Bonita —secluded beach strip popular with Europeans and Americans in the know

Get in [ edit ]

The Dominican Republic allows citizens of virtually every country in the Western Hemisphere to enter without a visa for up to 30 days ( Cuba , Haiti and Venezuela are notable exceptions). Also visa-exempt are citizens of any of the European Union / European Economic Area member states, Australia, Bahrain, Hong Kong SAR, Israel, Japan, Macao SAR, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, and Zimbabwe. See Entry Requirements [dead link] . The 30 day visa waiver can be extended once for an additional 30 days.

All arriving passengers regardless of citizenship or residency status must complete an eTicket online prior to departing for the Dominican Republic. This consolidates and digitizes the arriving passenger/ tourist card, customs declaration, and health declaration required to enter the country and produces a QR code that can be scanned by immigration and customs. Information requested on the eTicket application is fairly straightforward, traveler details, passport number, purpose and dates of trip, where you'll be staying, etc... In all likelihood you will not be asked to produce the QR code on arrival (it appears to be linked to your passport number), but your airline will ask to see it.

A US$10 tourism fee is payable by all arriving foreigners apart from returning residents. Formerly, this was paid in cash just prior to going through passport control, although since the eTicket system was introduced in 2019, it's now almost universally collected as part of the traveler's airfare or cruise package. Private aviation and yacht passengers must pay this fee on arrival in US Dollars or Euros ( not Dominican Pesos).

By plane [ edit ]

The main airports (in alphabetical order) are:

  • ( AZS  IATA ) Samana, also known as "El Catey", located between the towns of Nagua and Samana on the north coast.
  • ( EPS  IATA ) Samana, also known as "Aeropuerto Internacional Arroyo Barril" between Sanchez and Samaná
  • ( JBQ  IATA ) "La Isabela" airport in Santo Domingo , mainly for domestic flights but also receives some flights from other Caribbean islands
  • ( LRM  IATA ) La Romana on the south east coast
  • ( POP  IATA ) Puerto Plata, also known as "Gregorio Luperon" on the north coast
  • ( PUJ  IATA ) Punta Cana International Airport in the east, the busiest in the country
  • ( SDQ  IATA ) Santo Domingo, also known as "Las Americas" on the south coast close to the capital city Santo Domingo
  • ( STI  IATA ) Santiago also known as "Cibao International" in Santiago de los Caballeros (the country's 2nd largest city).
  • ( COZ  IATA ) Constanza, a domestic airport to all Dominican destinations.
  • ( BRX  IATA ) Barahona, also known as "Aeropuerto Internacional María Montez" this airport was reopened during the earthquake in Haiti, in order to bring the primary aid to the Haitians.
  • ( CBJ  IATA ) Cabo Rojo, Pedernales, only for domestic use, located near Cabo Rojo port facility.

You can get flights from Europe via Frankfurt ( FRA  IATA ), Madrid ( MAD  IATA ) or Paris ( CDG  IATA ) and seasonally from London-Gatwick ( LGW  IATA ). From the US, you can fly from New York , Boston , Orlando , Ft. Lauderdale , Miami Airport , Philadelphia , Pittsburgh , San Juan , Atlanta Airport or Charlotte . Most European and Canadian cities have charter flight connections, which operate seasonally.

A departure tax of US$20 cash is payable on most charter and some scheduled flights, although all US and most European carriers include this as part of your airfare.

Taxi fares to nearby hotels are posted just outside the airports.

Taxi from the airport to Santo Domingo (Ciudad Colonial): it is about US$40. There are no hotel "courtesy shuttles" at airports in the Dominican Republic.

By boat [ edit ]

There is a ferry that travels between Mayagüez in Puerto Rico and Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. The website says the journey takes 12 hours, leaves Puerto Rico on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 20:00, and arrives in Dominican Republic at 08:00 the next morning.

For prices and bookings, visit the Ferries Del Caribe English website [dead link] .

Get around [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

Options for getting around the country include bus service, 'gua-guas' (pronounced "Gwa-Gwas": small battered vans or trucks that serve as a collective taxi running fixed routes that are very cheap but can also be very overloaded), domestic air flights and charter air service. There is a rail system operating only in the city of Santo Domingo. Most towns and cities have regularly scheduled bus service, if not by one of the big bus companies, then by gua-gua. The bus lines are most often simple, independently run operations, usually only connecting two cities within a region (Southwest, East, North) or between one city and the capital (with stops made for any towns on the route). Because of the geography of the country, to get from one region of the country to another you have to go through the capital. At horariodebuses.com you can check bus timetables between destinations in the country.

By car [ edit ]

Cars may be rented through Hertz, Avis, Prestige Car Rentals [formerly dead link] or other agencies in Santo Domingo and other major cities. Gasoline, however, is expensive often costing upward of US$5/gallon (as of June 2018). Some roads, especially in remote areas, are fairly dangerous (often without lane divisions) and many people tend not to respect oncoming traffic. Road conditions on most major highways are roughly similar to road conditions in the United States and western Europe. However, potholes and rough spots are not rapidly repaired and drivers must be aware that there are a significant number of rough spots even on some major highways. There are a number of very good roads such as DR-1 which is a four lane highway connecting the cities of Santo Domingo and Santiago and can be traveled with no trouble. Highway DR-7 is an excellent toll road from just east of Santo Domingo north to near Sanchez. From there, you can go east to the Samana peninsula or west along the northern coast of the DR and costs about US$11.

Probably the biggest challenge that an international visitor to the Dominican Republic will face if he or she chooses to rent a car is not so much dealing with automobile traffic, but rather avoiding accidentally running over pedestrians who cross poorly-lit streets and highways in the evening and nighttime hours. Lack of head/taillights on cars and especially motorcycles is also not unusual and with motorcycles this makes them extremely hard to spot. The best recommendation is not to drive after dusk. Outside of Santo Domingo, the motorbike (motoconcho) is an extremely common form of travel. If lost, you can hail a motorbike driver (motochonchista) and ask for directions. You will be taken to your destination by following the bike. A tip is appropriate for such help. Remember that many of these motorbike drivers look upon road rules as only recommendations. However, driving in the Dominican Republic should not be particularly difficult for experienced drivers from North America or Europe.

Guaguas (local buses) [ edit ]

Guaguas are the traditional means of transport in the Dominican Republic. Guaguas will be filled to the brink with people and luggage; expect to squeeze to fit more people who will be picked up en route. If you prefer authentic experience over comfort, traveling by guagua is the right choice.

Guagua comfort can range from air conditioned with leather seats to a bit worn down with open window air breeze cooling. Traveling with guaguas is safe, and tourists are treated friendly and get helped out.

You can also hop on mid way if you know where to stand on the route and gesture the driver; tell the conductor your destination and he'll tell you where to get off and how to switch guaguas; sometimes you'll have to ride across town to another bus station.

Prices are modest: RD$100-150 for a 1-2 hour ride. Since most guaguas are minibuses, you might have to stow your luggage on a seat; in this case you might have to pay a fee for the occupied seat. Larger routes get serviced by normal sized buses with a separate storage compartment.

Guaguas stop operating at dusk. Plan your trip with enough slack that you will be able to catch your last guagua when the sun is still up.

The guagua network is organic and does not require you to go through the capital; you might have to change several times though, as guaguas usually only connect two major cities.

Long-haul buses [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

Caribe Tours , based out of the capital, is the biggest bus company, and has coverage in most regions that are not well-served by the other 'official' bus companies. Unlike taxis and gua-guas, Caribe Tour rates are fixed by destination and are extremely reasonable due to government subsidies. Puerto Plata to Santo Domingo is roughly RD$425. Caribe Tour buses typically run from 07:00 to 16:00 (with departures approx. every two hours) and cover most major cities. On longer trips, expect a 10-minute stop for coffee and lunch. Buses are fairly luxurious with movies playing for the entire trip and air conditioning (which can be extremely cold - bring a sweater). Another option is the slightly more expensive Metrobus bus company . Metrobus serves the northern and eastern part of the country. The 'unofficial' gua-gua system covers nearly every road on the island for some moderate savings (if you don't mind being packed in).

In short, bus services across the country are comfortable and a good value. The buses are clean, air conditioned (bring sweater), usually play a movie, and are pretty inexpensive, costing no more than RD$300 one way cross-country.

Taxi services are available but potentially dangerous when dealing with unlicensed drivers. In all cases, it's a good idea to go with a licensed driver and negotiate a price for your destination before you leave. Good drivers are often easy to identify by licenses worn around the neck, uniforms, and clean air conditioned vehicles. When calling a taxi company, you will be given a number to verify your driver. When being picked up, make sure your driver gives you the right number as 'false pickups' are often a prelude to robbery.

Another way to get out and about is to book an excursion with one of the many representatives at most local hotels and resorts.

Talk [ edit ]

The official language of the Dominican Republic is Spanish . You will find some Spanish-English bilingual locals especially in Santo Domingo and tourist areas. If you speak some Spanish, most Dominicans will try hard to meet you half way and communicate. If you have a problem, you can probably find someone who speaks sufficient English (or probably French and possibly German, Italian or Russian) to help you out. Dominicans are quite friendly and will be quite helpful if you are polite and respectful. Haitians living in the DR may speak Haitian Creole and you may hear a few African and Arawakan words interspersed with the Spanish, especially in rural areas. Communication should not be a problem even for those who speak only a minimum of Spanish. If you are traveling to one of the large all-inclusive hotels, you will have no language problems.

Dominicans speak a particular brand of Caribbean Spanish. As far as pronunciation, expect the letter S to often disappear at the end of words or syllables. In some areas, people with a strong Dominican accent may turn R's into L's. Some commonplace Dominican Spanish words you might not be familiar with from other countries include:

  • menudo means "change", as in coins or the money a vendor returns to you when you give them more money than the price of what you're buying (you're not going crazy - in Mexico, "menudo" is soup made from cow's stomach)
  • funda is a bag, as in a cashier asking "Do you want a bag?". The term "bolsa", commonly used in the rest of the Spanish-speaking world is a slang term for "scrotum" in the DR and can elicit chuckles or smirks, especially in younger and more irreverent circles. "Bolsa!" can also be said as an expression of frustration, akin to "dammit".
  • colmado is a locally-owned neighborhood store, selling drinks, dry and canned foods, and sometimes more
  • banca is a window selling lottery tickets - not to be confused with banco , a bank
  • zafacón is a garbage can or wastebasket
  • concho means a taxi, including the ubiquitous motoconcho , a motorcycle taxi
  • pasola is a moped / motor scooter (i.e. a small motorbike with a covered body and a footrest directly in front of the seat)

See [ edit ]

There is one UNESCO World Heritage Site, the old town of Santo Domingo which is the oldest European city in the Americas. In addition to that there are many national parks and beaches in the country.

Do [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

Climb/hike to the top of Pico Duarte . At 3,098 m it's not only the highest mountain in the Dominican Republic but in the whole Caribbean .

National parks [ edit ]

  • Los Haitises National Park
  • Jaragua National Park
  • National Park Isla Cabritos
  • Armando Bermudez National Park
  • Jose Del Carmen Ramirez National Park
  • Sierra del Bahoruco National Park
  • Parque Nacional del Este
  • Monte Cristi National Park
  • Parque Historico La Isabela

Buy [ edit ]

Money [ edit ].

The currency of the Dominican Republic is the Dominican peso denoted by the symbol " $ " or " RD$ " (ISO code: DOP ). Wikivoyage uses "RD$" for clarity.

Coins in the Dominican Republic come in denominations of RD$1, RD$5, RD$10 and RD$25. Banknotes in the Dominican Republic come in denominations of RD$20, RD$50, RD$100, RD$200, RD$500, RD$1,000 and RD$2,000.

At airports and harbors you can change your U.S. dollars and euros in Dominican pesos, though the rates there are not great. It makes sense to get only as many pesos as necessary there and change more later on at your destination or to withdraw pesos from an ATM with your credit or debit card. You may not be able to exchange back Dominican pesos to U.S. dollars and euros in most countries, so do it before leaving.

In most cities you can find a Banco Popular and Scotiabank — their ATMs allow withdrawals with Visa, Mastercard and Maestro. They usually impose a very low limit but allow several withdrawals at once. Even though it is possible to withdraw money in the bank directly, most will flatly refuse this and point one at their ATMs. Unless you are very proficient in Spanish and willing to fight this out with the staff, you must pay a fee for every withdrawal — between RD$100 and RD$200. Depending on the season the limits change — in high season the limits are higher, in low season they go lower. It always makes sense to try a value that ends in 900 if the 1,000 don't work (e.g. if 4,000 is over the limit, try 3,900 first before trying 3000). Bank Reservas does not work for U.S.-issued Fidelity debit card and could cause errors in the statement. Banco Popular would decline withdrawals too, while Scotiabank has been very reliable.

Shopping [ edit ]

One of the best spots in the Colonial District of Santo Domingo to shop is the several blocks long outdoor mall, El Conde Street. It offers everything from street vendors (it is not recommended to eat off these) to knock-off name brand clothing for extremely inexpensive prices. There are some very pleasant outdoor restaurants that serve as perfect spots to people watch and drink Presidente (their most popular beer).

During the day, there are also several touristy shops where you can buy cheap presents for the family back home including authentic paintings and beautiful jewelry. There is also a very nice cigar shop at the end of the mall across from the cathedral. Clothes, however, are generally very economical and often of good quality. Most prices can be negotiated. US dollars are accepted in most areas.

Drink [ edit ]

  • Beer: Presidente , Republica
  • Rum: Brugal , Barcelo , Bermudez , Macorix , Siboney , Punta Cana .
  • Mama Juana: a mixture of bark and herbs left to soak in rum, red wine and honey.
  • Non-alcoholic: Morirsoñando , Piña Colada , Jugo de Chinola , Countryclub Merengue soda .

Additionally, other imported drinks are available for purchase—at least in the towns and cities—they might not be as readily available out in the countryside.

Do not drink tap water! Locals, even in the most rural areas, will either boil their water or purchase bottled water. Eating salads or other food that may be washed in tap water is not advisable. Ice is a bad idea as well, except in luxury hotels and restaurants (which produce ice from bottled water). If you plan on cooking or washing dishes for longer stays, it is a good idea to rinse everything with bottled or boiled water before use.

Eat [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

Food in the Dominican Republic is very diverse, a fusion of Spanish, African and Taino culture. The national dish, “La Bandera”, consists of rice, red kidney beans and meat. The most popular breakfast is called “Tres Golpes” and is made out of mangú (smashed green plantains, fried cheese, salami and eggs). Tostones are also very popular, and the fried pork mofongo. Lots of types of tropical fruits and seafood are eaten. Most restaurant meals will cost an additional 18% tax plus 10% service: for very good service, it is customary to leave an additional 10%.

Sleep [ edit ]

Lodging in the Dominican Republic is plentiful, with options ranging from huge, all-inclusive beach resorts to more personal options scattered along the coasts and in the cities. Hotels charge a 25% room tax, so inquire beforehand to determine if that tax is included (often the case) in the listed room price. The country has hostels which offer their shared rooms.

Learn [ edit ]

Many US universities offer study abroad options for the Dominican Republic. The two most common cities hosting exchange students are Santo Domingo and Santiago. Check with local universities for programs and prices. Spanish language schools are located in major cities and on the north coast as well.

Work [ edit ]

Most companies do not require anything more than a passport to work. There are a lot of US companies in the country, especially in Santo Domingo and DN (the National District). There are good opportunities for English speaking employees. The country has several free zones, lots of them in the call center area.

Volunteer [ edit ]

There are several volunteer opportunities in the Dominican Republic. Many worldwide organizations offer extended travel for anyone willing to volunteer their time to work with locals on projects such as community development, conservation, wildlife sanctuary maintenance & development, scientific research, and education programs.

  • Orphanage Outreach
  • Inter-American Foundation
  • International Student Volunteers Dominican Republic [dead link]
  • The DREAM Project
  • Peace Corps Dominican Republic

Stay safe [ edit ]

The Dominican Republic is generally a safe country. Although the major cities of Santo Domingo and Santiago have experienced the growth of a thriving middle class, construction booms and reached a high level of cosmopolitanism, the Dominican Republic remains a developing country and poverty is still rampant in many areas, so you need to take common sense precautions:

  • Relatively fewer streets, particularly ones that are not main thoroughfares, are lit after dark than you might expect or see back home, even in the capital of Santo Domingo. Those that are lit are subject to routine power outages is as the rest of the country.
  • Wild dogs are common throughout the country but largely ignore people (feeding these dogs is not recommended as this may induce aggressive behavior).
  • Western travelers should dress casually and avoid displaying ostentatious or flashy jewelry or other expensive luxury items when away from tourist destinations. Common tourist destinations, particularly the more expensive and the luxury hotels and areas, are very safe.
  • Sex tourism is prevalent in the Puerto Plata province of the country, so you may be hassled by young men or women trying to offer you 'services'. A firm 'No' is good enough. The age of consent is 18, and tourists who have sex with minors may also be prosecuted by their home country.
  • There are no laws dictating the maximum amount of alcohol that can be drunk prior to driving. However, there is a 0.05% limit for professional drivers. Be wary of vehicles, especially during the late evening, as there is a much higher possibility at that time that the driver is intoxicated. It is illegal for tourists and visitors to drink and drive and, besides it being a bad idea, you may be penalized for doing so.
  • The level of professionalism of the National Police is somewhat debatable. To protect income from tourism, the government has established the Politur or "tourist police" for the safety of foreign tourists. Travelers should contact this agency if any problems are encountered as they will have a much more positive response than with the national police.

Stay healthy [ edit ]

dominican republic tourism facts

Malaria can be a rare issue around rainforests if travelers don't take protective measures such as repellents against mosquito bites. No cases have been reported over the past 8 years within the tourist areas. Be sure to consult with a physician before departure.

There is a risk of dengue fever and chikungunya fever which is contracted through mosquitoes that bite during the day and during some seasons of the year. No vaccine is available, so again using mosquito repellent is advisable .

Many of the local foods are safe to eat including the meats, fruits, and vegetables.

Visitors, however, should not drink any of the local water and should stay with bottled water or other beverages. It is important for visitors to stay hydrated in the hot, humid climate.

Sunburn and sun poisoning are a great risk. The sun is very bright here. Use at least SPF30 sunblock. Limit sun exposure .

The country's adult HIV/AIDS prevalence is reaching 2.0% or 1 in 50 adults, which is almost 3 times higher than the USA. Practice safe sex.

Respect [ edit ]

Dominicans are kind and peaceful people. Attempts at speaking Spanish are a good sign of respect for the local people. Be polite, show respect, and do your best to speak the language, and you will be treated with kindness.

Avoid talking about Haiti. Although relations have improved, many Dominicans, particularly of the older generations, harbor resentment towards Haitians. Santo Domingo was invaded and occupied by Haiti for a good part of the 19th century, and the Dominican Republic actually fought its first war of independence against Haiti, not Spain, after which the Dominican Republic faced several other invasions from its neighbor.

Trujillo's dictatorship massacred tens of thousands of Haitians in the 1930s, which fueled the resentment between both nations. The massacre is known as the "parsley massacre" as apparently the way the genocidaires distinguished the ethnicity of their would-be victims was by letting them pronounce the shibboleth "perejil", the Spanish word for parsley, which is difficult to pronounce for native speakers of French or Haitian Creole. Nowadays, about a million Haitians (which is a lot considering the small populations of either country) live in the Dominican Republic, most of them illegally. Some Dominicans' opinions towards illegal immigrants from Haiti are similar to some Americans' attitudes towards Mexican illegal immigrants, with the major difference that, unlike the US, the Dominican Republic is a small and poor country by world standards, but still much much richer and more stable than Haiti. Gang wars can erupt along the border, so stay cautious and be sensitive.

Still, the issues remain very complex and Dominicans often find their position to be misunderstood by foreigners. For example, the Dominican Republic was the first country to come to Haiti's aid in the 2010 Haitian earthquake and has made impressive efforts to help its neighbor during this crisis. This shows that despite their historical, linguistic, religious, cultural and ethnic differences, Haitians and Dominicans still consider each other to be brotherly, yet proudly independent, nations.

When staying at the luxury resorts or really any place in the Dominican Republic, it is advisable to tip for most services. The Dominican Republic is still a fairly poor country and tipping the people who serve you helps them better their sometimes dire economic situation.

It's a good idea to avoid talking about race in the Dominican Republic. Most Dominicans, even very dark-skinned Dominicans who would absolutely be considered black in Europe and the American mainland, will not self-identify as "black" ( negro / negra ), reserving that term for Haitians and folks from sub-Saharan Africa. Don't call a Dominican a "negro/a" (black person) as this may lead to your being called a racist. There are plethora of other designations and terms defining skin color ranging from "dark white" to "wheat color" (trigueño/a), "mulatto", "brown" (moreno/a), to, perhaps the most ridiculous, "Indian" (indio/a), despite the Taíno people being largely wiped out after the arrival of the Spaniards. Most Dominicans are of mixed-race heritage with Spanish/Iberian heritage as well as African heritage and even some (nominal amounts) native Taíno roots. Many Dominicans seem to take great pride in being mixed race and not black, unlike their poorer neighbors in Haiti. The notion of "good hair" and "bad hair" (straight vs. kinky) is very much a thing as well, and women who don't straighten their hair or who wear it in an Afro, dreadlocks, or other Afrocentric styles are often derisively called "shaggy" (greñuda) and are often unable to obtain jobs in office settings like banks, etc. due to their "unprofessional" appearance. Under the Trujillo dictatorship there was an entire color caste system developed, and its vestiges are still felt to this day. A particularly bizarre eddy of this racist current was that during the Holocaust, Trujillo offered to take in Jewish refugees as he considered them "white" and thus a "betterment of the race" – a view that is not widely shared by other racists, for what it's worth. This type of thing is best not discussed as, no matter how much evidence you may present that this notion of euro-centrism and colorism is backwards, racist, and post-colonial, you'll simply be told that you're an outsider and don't understand their culture.

Connect [ edit ]

By phone [ edit ].

Telephone numbers in the Dominican Republic use area code +1 (809) with +1 (829) and +1 (849) as overlay codes. Telecommunications in the Dominican Republic use the North American Numbering Plan country code, 1, followed by the area code as in the US and Canada.

When in the Dominican Republic and just like in the US and much of Canada, the 3-digit area code followed by the 7-digit phone number must be dialed. When calling the Dominican Republic from the United States or Canada, this must be prefixed by the digit "1", it will be charged at international rate. From other countries the international prefix used in the originating country must be dialed before the "1".

There are three phone carriers in the Dominican Republic, Altice , Claro and Viva . All networks have 2G, 3G, and 4G LTE coverage with Claro and Altice already implementing 5G in most urban areas.

External Links [ edit ]

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Your Trip to the Dominican Republic: The Complete ...

Your Trip to the Dominican Republic: The Complete Guide

dominican republic tourism facts

The Dominican Republic is known for its beautiful beaches and a multitude of resorts, but it’s also one of the most diverse destinations you can visit and one that remains culturally rich. You’ll want to come here for the country's merengue, bachata and live music and dancing scene, its hospitable people, as well as its rich outdoors, brimming with cacao and coffee trails, farms, and tropical forests. From colonial cities to beach towns, national parks with hiking trails and mountains, offshore islands, and wildlife-rich lagoons, there’s more to do and see than you can fit in one trip.

Here are some tips for an overview of what to expect on your trip to the Dominican Republic, to give you a leg up on activities, accommodation options, best ways to save, and cultural norms.

 TripSavvy / Evan Polenghi

Planning Your Trip

Best Time to Visit : The weather is spectacular from late November through February, with breezy mornings and evenings. Rain showers are rare during this time, and temperatures are in the low to mid 80 degrees Fahrenheit during the day.

Language: The official language in the Dominican Republic is Spanish  . Dominicans tend to speak very fast. They also have their own Dominican Spanish terminology and slang. Learning a few popular phrases can help break the ice.

Currency: The Dominican peso  . The rates fluctuate—$1 is approximately 52 Dominican pesos as of Dec. 2019.

Getting Around: Public transportation is widely available, from large coach buses connecting different parts of the country to smaller van buses or “guaguas” for town-to-town transfers, and local shared taxis (“carritos”) as well as motorbike taxis. Major car rental companies are available in major cities and airports.

Travel Tip: Fridays are school field trip days, so museums and historical sites can get crowded. Beaches and rivers are also busy on Sunday, when locals flock to the seaside or to freshwater to relax, party, and cool off. To avoid disappointment, agree on fares before you agree to any service; tipping is customary.

Things to Do

There are a myriad of activities available in the Dominican Republic, from extreme outdoor adventures to cultural experiences.

  • Tour history, architecture, and museums: Visit the Colonial City in Santo Domingo, a UNESCO World Heritage Site  —tour its museums and 16th-century structures such as the Ozama Fortress. Walk Puerto Plata city’s center for Victorian architecture.
  • Hike and enjoy the great outdoors: Nature sights abound wherever you choose to stay in the DR. Hike national parks and mountains and swim in waterfalls in Jarabacoa. Hike Taino caves in Barahona and Pedernales. Go canyoning to 27 Damajagua Falls and Magic Mushroom in Puerto Plata province. Go beach-hopping and sample the country's 30 miles of coastline  , from Punta Cana to the Samana Peninsula’s rugged beaches reached by boat, Puerto Plata’s golden coast and offshore islands Saona and Catalina.
  • Experience the culture: Sample Dominican cuisine , dance to live merengue and bachata, have drinks at the colmado (the local bodega) and attend a baseball game in season or join in when you see teams practicing.

Explore more attractions, including the best things to do in the Dominican Republic , and the top things to do in Santo Domingo .

What to Eat and Drink

Dominican cuisine is a rich blend of cultures, from Taino to African, Spanish, and Middle Eastern. A typical Dominican dish you should try is mangů—look for this staple plantain mash at breakfast. Sancocho, hearty meat and root vegetable stew, is a Dominican favorite. Streetside fried snacks are also popular, particularly late at night, such as chimichurri burgers, chicharron, or fried pork rinds. A staple Dominican dish found at almost any local restaurant at lunchtime is the national dish, or la bandera Dominicana: rice and beans with stewed chicken, beef or fish, and a side of salad, from potato to pasta salads, and slices of fried plantain.

Desserts are a must in the DR, many of which are coconut-based. Ask locals for the best bakery or dulceria in your area. Ice cream is also popular given the weather; local brand BON has locales all over the country, and you’ll spot mobile ice cream vendors in neighborhoods and parks.

Drinks are part and parcel of life in the country. Sample the country’s renowned rum brands—Brugal and Barcelo or Bermudez, to start—but also taste the many fresh tropical fruit juices. These are also offered as refreshing smoothies, known as batidas, typically made with condensed milk and sugar. A famous Dominican batida is called “morir sonando”—dying while dreaming—a shake made with oranges, condensed milk, and sugar.

For more information, read our full-length articles on foods to try in the DR, best restaurants in Santo Domingo , and Santo Domingo's nightlife .

Where to Stay

Wherever you choose to stay in the Dominican Republic, accommodation options are the widest and most varied in the Caribbean You’ll find a place to stay to suit every taste and budget.

There are boutique colonial hotels as well as hostels, brand hotels ranging from Sheraton to the JW Marriot, and AirBnB options in the major cities such as Santo Domingo, Santiago and Puerto Plata. Major tourism regions offer all inclusive resorts of various sizes, as well as small locally-owned hotels, budget guesthouses, and luxurious villa rentals.

Explore our article on the best places to visit in the Dominican Republic as you plan your trip.

Getting There

The Dominican Republic has seven international airports receiving international flights from all over the world, including neighboring Caribbean islands. The best way to fly to the DR is to select the airport that is closest to your chosen accommodation. The four most popular airports include:

  • Punta Cana International Airport (PUJ): Ideal for stays in any part of the Punta Cana area, including Bavaro, Cabeza de Toro, Cap Cana, and Uvero Alto.
  • Las Americas International Airport (SDQ): Located in Santo Domingo. Ideal for stays in Santo Domingo, Boca Chica, and Juan Dolio.
  • Gregorio Luperon International Airport (POP): Located in Puerto Plata. Ideal for stays in Puerto Plata, Cabarete, Sosua, and locations on the north coast.
  • El Catey International Airport (AZS): Located in Samana. Ideal for stays anywhere on the Samana Peninsula.
  • Cibao International Airport (STI): Located just outside of Santiago de los Caballeros, the country’s second-largest city. Ideal for stays in Jarabacoa or Puerto Plata, approximately an hour and 20 minutes north.

Car rentals are available at all major international airports and in major cities. Highways are extensive countrywide, as the country boasts some of the most developed infrastructure in the Caribbean. You can also access major bus terminals with a quick cab ride from Santo Domingo, Puerto Plata, and Punta Cana.

Culture and Customs

As a major tourism destination, the Dominican Republic offers many modern conveniences and it won’t be a major culture shock to visit. There are, however, cultural customs that you’ll want to know of to immerse smoothly and to be respectful of the destination and its people.

  • It is considered good manners to say good morning or greet as you enter a business or public transportation, even if it’s filled with strangers. “Saludos” and “Buen Dia” go a long way in establishing respect and rapport. Greeting is expected as you enter shops or places where you are seeking assistance.
  • Tipping is customary for services received, from hotels to taxi drivers and staff at all inclusive resorts. Tip generously. In restaurants, you might have to flag the waiter down for the bill; there’s rarely a rush to kick the customer out.
  • There is such a thing as “Dominican time” when it comes to events; expect a one or two hour delay.
  • When agreeing to services of any kind, such as taxis and tours, agree on a price before you accept. Do not flag down or enter random taxis in the big cities, or venture alone to local clubs and bars after dark, unless in a major tourist area such as the Colonial City. Keep the Uber app on your phone and purchase a local data plan in case there is no Wi-Fi where you’re going.
  • Driving in the DR’s cities can be intimidating unless you have extensive experience driving abroad or in New York City. Opt for taxis or private drivers instead.

Money Saving Tips

  • Public parks are ubiquitous in the Dominican Republic; buy your own drinks at the local “colmado” or bodega, and head to the park to enjoy and save from pricey bars and cocktails.
  • Rideshares such as Uber are popular in Santo Domingo and Santiago and will save you money in-city or to airports.
  • Taking the bus to various parts of the country is easy. Services such as Caribe Tours, Expreso Bavaro, and Metro Tours are safe and have numerous daily departures to multiple parts of the DR for a reasonable fare that doesn’t exceed $10. Buses are air-conditioned and occasionally have Wi-Fi and movies.
  • Book your tours directly with licensed tour providers rather than through your hotel; this will save you money. Be sure to research the tour operators before you sign up.

Dominican Republic Ministry of Tourism . "Travel Tips."

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization . "Colonial City of Santo Domingo."

Dominican Republic Ministry of Tourism . "Punta Cana."

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Tourism Teacher

Tourism in the Dominican Republic – A Detailed Guide

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Tourism in the Dominican Republic is extremely important. But why? Find out in this article that teaches you all about tourism in the Dominican Republic, why it matters and what it looks like in practice. Ready to learn more about tourism in the Dominican Republic ? Keep scrolling…

Tourism in Dominican Republic 

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The Dominican Republic is a Caribbean nation that has been a popular tourist destination for decades. With its stunning beaches, rich culture , and warm hospitality, it is easy to see why millions of tourists flock to this tropical paradise each year.

In this article, I will explore the many facets of tourism in the Dominican Republic, from the best places to visit to the unique experiences that await adventurous travellers. Whether you are planning your first trip to this vibrant country or are a seasoned visitor, join us as we delve into the wonders of tourism in the Dominican Republic.

Tourism in the Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic is a country located in the Caribbean region of North America. It shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti to the west, and is bordered to the south by the Caribbean Sea and to the north by the Atlantic Ocean . The country has a total land area of approximately 48,670 square kilometres, making it the second largest country in the Caribbean after Cuba. The terrain of the Dominican Republic is varied, with high mountains, fertile valleys, and vast coastal plains.

The highest peak in the Caribbean, Pico Duarte, is located in the central region of the country and reaches an elevation of 3,087 meters. Other notable mountain ranges include the Cordillera Central, which runs through the centre of the country, and the Sierra de Bahoruco, which forms part of the border with Haiti.

The country’s coastline is approximately 1,600 kilometres long, with many beautiful beaches and coral reefs. The most famous beaches are in the east of the country, in the Punta Cana and La Romana areas.

The Dominican Republic has a tropical climate, with temperatures averaging between 25°C and 30°C throughout the year. The rainy season runs from May to November, with the heaviest rainfall typically occurring in September and October.

30 Exciting Facts About Dominican Republic

Tourism in the Dominican Republic is one of the largest and most important sectors of the Dominican Republic’s economy, accounting for a significant portion of the country’s GDP and providing employment for a large number of people.

Here are some statistics about the tourism industry in the Dominican Republic:

  • In 2019, the Dominican Republic welcomed a record-breaking 7.6 million international visitors, up from 6.5 million in 2018.
  • The tourism industry contributed approximately 17% of the country’s GDP in 2019, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council .
  • The Dominican Republic is the most visited destination in the Caribbean, accounting for more than one-third of all tourist arrivals to the region.
  • The United States is the largest source market for tourists to the Dominican Republic, followed by Canada, Europe, and Latin America.
  • The tourism industry provides direct employment for approximately 300,000 people in the Dominican Republic, and supports many other jobs in related industries such as transportation, food and beverage, and entertainment.
  • The most popular tourist destinations in the Dominican Republic are Punta Cana, Santo Domingo, Puerto Plata, and La Romana.
  • The average length of stay for tourists in the Dominican Republic is approximately 9 days, and the average expenditure per tourist is around £1,000.

Why people travel to Dominican Republic

30 Exciting Facts About Dominican Republic

Tourism in the Dominican Republic is BIG business. But why do people travel here? Well, there are several reasons why people travel to the Dominican Republic, which are:

The Dominican Republic is known for its beautiful beaches, with crystal-clear waters and soft sand. Popular beach destinations include Punta Cana, Bavaro, and Juan Dolio.

Tourism in the Dominican Republic has a big focus on culture. The country has a rich history and culture that is influenced by its African, European, and indigenous Taíno roots. Visitors can explore historic landmarks, museums, and cultural events throughout the country, making cultural tourism a popular choice here.

The country’s diverse geography offers a range of adventure tourism activities, including hiking, mountain climbing, surfing, zip-lining, and more.

The Dominican Republic has a large number of all-inclusive resorts that offer a variety of amenities, including pools, restaurants, and entertainment options. Package tourism is the most popular type of tourism here.

The cost of living in the Dominican Republic is relatively low, which makes it an attractive destination for budget-conscious travellers.

The Dominican Republic has a warm and tropical climate that is ideal for year-round travel.

The Dominican Republic is known for its passion for sports tourism , especially baseball. Visitors can watch professional baseball games or take part in other sports activities such as golf, tennis, and water sports.

Tourism in the Dominican Republic has a vibrant nightlife scene, especially in cities like Santo Domingo and Punta Cana, with a range of bars, clubs, and music venues.

Overall, the Dominican Republic offers a mix of cultural, natural, and leisure attractions that make it a popular travel destination for a wide range of visitors.

The Dominican Republic is a popular honeymoon destination , particularly with tourists from the USA due to its relatively close proximity. There are many resorts across the island that cater especially for this.

Tourism in the Dominican Republic offers a variety of tourism experiences, and here are some of the most popular types of tourism in the country:

  • Beach tourism : The country is known for its beautiful beaches and crystal-clear waters, which make it a popular destination for beach lovers. The most popular beach destinations include Punta Cana, Bavaro, and Puerto Plata.
  • All-inclusive resort tourism: The Dominican Republic has a large number of all-inclusive resorts that offer a variety of amenities, including pools, restaurants, and entertainment options.
  • Ecotourism : The country has a rich natural environment with diverse flora and fauna, which makes it an ideal destination for eco-tourism. Visitors can explore national parks, rainforests, and protected areas, and participate in activities such as hiking, bird watching, and zip-lining.
  • Adventure tourism: The country’s diverse geography offers a range of adventure activities, including mountain climbing, surfing, zip-lining, and more.
  • Cultural tourism: The Dominican Republic has a rich history and culture that is influenced by its African, European, and indigenous Taíno roots. Visitors can explore historic landmarks, museums, and cultural events throughout the country.
  • Medical tourism : The Dominican Republic has a growing medical tourism industry, with many visitors traveling to the country for medical treatments, such as plastic surgery, dental care, and other medical procedures.
  • Golf tourism : The Dominican Republic is becoming an increasingly popular destination for golfers, with many world-class golf courses located throughout the country.

30 Exciting Facts About Dominican Republic

The spectacular tourist attractions are what makes tourism in the Dominican Republic so unique. Here are some of the most popular ones:

  • Punta Cana : Punta Cana is a popular beach destination in the eastern part of the country. It is known for its beautiful beaches, all-inclusive resorts, and water sports activities.
  • Santo Domingo: Santo Domingo is the capital of the Dominican Republic and is known for its rich history and culture. Visitors can explore historic landmarks such as the Alcazar de Colón, the Cathedral of Santa Maria la Menor, and the National Palace.
  • Saona Island: Saona Island is a popular excursion destination located off the southeastern coast of the country. It is known for its pristine beaches, turquoise waters, and natural beauty.
  • Los Haitises National Park: Los Haitises National Park is a protected area in the northeastern part of the country. It is known for its caves , mangroves, and diverse flora and fauna.
  • Altos de Chavon : Altos de Chavon is a recreated medieval village located in La Romana. It is known for its architecture, art galleries, and cultural events.
  • Cabarete : Cabarete is a popular destination for water sports enthusiasts, especially for windsurfing and kiteboarding. It is located in the northern part of the country.
  • Samaná : Samaná is a scenic region located in the northeastern part of the country. It is known for its natural beauty, including waterfalls , beaches, and whale watching.
  • Jarabacoa : Jarabacoa is a mountain town located in the central part of the country. It is known for its scenic beauty, including waterfalls, rivers, and mountains.

Tourism in the Dominican Republic

Tourism in the Dominican Republic attracts a diverse range of tourists from different parts of the world, including:

  • Leisure tourists : These are tourists who travel to the Dominican Republic for relaxation, to enjoy the country’s beautiful beaches, resorts, and leisure activities.
  • Adventure tourists: These are tourists who travel to the Dominican Republic to take part in outdoor activities such as hiking, mountain climbing, zip-lining, and other adventure sports.
  • Cultural tourists: These are tourists who are interested in exploring the Dominican Republic’s rich history and culture. They may visit museums, historic landmarks, and attend cultural events.
  • Eco-tourists : These are tourists who travel to the Dominican Republic to explore its natural beauty, including rainforests, national parks, and wildlife.
  • Sports tourists: These are tourists who travel to the Dominican Republic to participate in sports activities such as golf, tennis, and water sports, or to watch professional sports games, especially baseball.
  • Medical tourists: The Dominican Republic is also attracting a growing number of medical tourists who come for medical treatments, such as plastic surgery, dental care, and other medical procedures.

When managing tourism in the Dominican Republic it is important crime and safety.

Crime and safety are important considerations for tourists when traveling to the Dominican Republic. While the country is generally safe for tourists, there are certain areas and situations where crime can occur. Here are some important things to know:

  • Petty crime : Petty crime such as pickpocketing, theft, and bag snatching can occur in crowded tourist areas such as beaches, markets, and shopping malls. It is important to take precautions such as keeping valuable items in a secure place, not leaving belongings unattended, and being aware of your surroundings.
  • Scams : Tourists may also encounter scams, such as fake taxi drivers, fraudulent tour operators, and street vendors selling fake goods. It is important to use official taxi services, reputable tour operators, and to be cautious when purchasing goods from street vendors.
  • Violence : Violent crime can occur in certain areas of the country, particularly in urban areas such as Santo Domingo and Santiago. It is important to avoid high-crime areas and to take precautions when traveling at night.
  • Traffic accidents: Traffic accidents are common in the Dominican Republic, and visitors should be cautious when driving or using public transportation.
  • Natural disasters: The Dominican Republic is prone to natural disasters such as hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes. Visitors should be aware of the risks and follow the guidance of local authorities.

To stay safe while traveling in the Dominican Republic, tourists should take basic safety precautions such as staying aware of their surroundings, using reputable services, and following the guidance of local authorities. It is also recommended to avoid carrying large amounts of cash, jewellery or other valuables while traveling.

30 Exciting Facts About Dominican Republic

It is imperitive that tourism in the Dominican Republic is sustainable .

Sustainability has become an increasingly important topic in the Dominican Republic in recent years, as the country seeks to balance economic growth with environmental protection and social responsibility . There are several initiatives and efforts underway to promote sustainable practices and preserve tourism in the Dominican Republic along with the natural beauty and cultural heritage of the country.

One example of sustainable tourism in the Dominican Republic is the development of ecotourism activities. This includes activities such as bird watching, hiking, and cultural tours that focus on the natural and cultural assets of the country while minimising the impact on the environment. Many tour operators and hotels are now implementing sustainable practices, such as reducing water and energy consumption, recycling waste, and supporting local communities through responsible tourism practices.

Another important aspect of sustainability in the Dominican Republic is the protection of the country’s natural resources. This includes the preservation of the country’s forests , beaches, and marine ecosystems, which are vital for the tourism industry and the livelihoods of local communities. The Dominican Republic has established several protected areas, including national parks and wildlife reserves, to conserve these resources and promote responsible tourism.

In addition, the government of the Dominican Republic has implemented policies and programs to support sustainable development. This includes the establishment of the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources , which is responsible for promoting sustainable practices and protecting the environment, as well as the development of a National Sustainable Tourism Plan that outlines strategies for sustainable tourism development.

While there is still much work to be done, the Dominican Republic is making progress towards a more sustainable future. By promoting sustainable tourism practices, protecting natural resources, and supporting local communities, the country is working to ensure that future generations can continue to enjoy the beauty and cultural richness of this vibrant Caribbean nation.

The cost of visiting the Dominican Republic can vary depending on a number of factors, such as the time of year you travel, the activities you choose to do, and the level of comfort you desire. Here are some general guidelines for budgeting a trip to the Dominican Republic:

  • Flights : The cost of flights to the Dominican Republic can vary depending on where you are traveling from and the time of year you travel. Generally, flights can range from £200-£800 round trip.
  • Accommodation : Accommodation options in the Dominican Republic range from budget-friendly hostels and guesthouses to luxury resorts. Budget accommodation can range from £20-£50 per night, while mid-range hotels and resorts can range from £80-£200 per night. Luxury resorts can range from £300-£1,000 per night.
  • Food and drinks: The cost of food and drinks can vary depending on the type of restaurant or bar you visit. In general, local street food and casual restaurants can range from £5-£20 per meal, while mid-range restaurants can range from £20-£50 per meal. Drinks can range from £2-£10 per drink.
  • Activities and excursions : The cost of activities and excursions in the Dominican Republic can vary depending on the activity and the tour operator. Excursions such as zip-lining, ATV tours, and horseback riding can range from £50-£100 per person, while day trips to popular tourist destinations can range from £50-£150 per person.

Overall, a budget of £50-£100 per day for accommodation, food, and activities would be reasonable for a backpacker or budget traveler. A mid-range traveler could expect to spend £100-£200 per day, while a luxury traveler could expect to spend £300 or more per day. Keep in mind that these are general guidelines, and your actual costs may vary depending on your travel style and preferences.

Tourism in the Dominican Republic is better experienced with a little bit of planning. If you are planning to visit the Dominican Republic, here are some general tips to help you have a safe and enjoyable trip:

  • Learn some Spanish : While many people in the Dominican Republic speak English, knowing some Spanish can be helpful for communicating with locals and navigating day-to-day interactions.
  • Pack appropriate clothing : The Dominican Republic has a tropical climate, so pack lightweight, breathable clothing that is comfortable in hot and humid weather. However, it is also recommended to bring long-sleeved shirts and pants to protect against mosquitos and the sun.
  • Be aware of the local customs: The Dominican Republic has a rich culture and customs that visitors should be aware of. For example, it is considered rude to wear swimwear outside of the beach or resort area, and tipping is expected in restaurants and for other services.
  • Stay hydrated : The Dominican Republic can be very hot and humid, so it is important to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated.
  • Use sunscreen and mosquito repellent: The sun in the Dominican Republic can be very strong, so use sunscreen with a high SPF and reapply frequently. Mosquitos can also be a concern, so bring mosquito repellent and consider wearing long-sleeved clothing and pants in the evenings.
  • Use official taxis and transportation : To avoid scams and ensure your safety, use official taxi services and reputable transportation companies when traveling around the Dominican Republic.
  • Be cautious with money and valuables: As with any travel destination, it is important to be cautious with your money and valuables. Keep important documents and cash in a safe place, and avoid carrying large amounts of cash or wearing expensive jewelry in public.

By following these tips and being aware of your surroundings, you can have a safe and enjoyable trip to the Dominican Republic.

If you are interesting in learning more about tourism in the Dominican Republic (and if you hsve read this far I am guessing you are!), then I am sure you would also like to know some of the most interesting facts about the Dominican Republic. Here are my favourites:

  • The Dominican Republic is the second-largest country in the Caribbean, after Cuba.
  • The island of Hispaniola, which the Dominican Republic shares with Haiti, was the first place Christopher Columbus landed in the New World in 1492.
  • Baseball is the most popular sport in the Dominican Republic, and many Major League Baseball players come from the country.
  • The Dominican Republic is home to Pico Duarte, the highest mountain in the Caribbean, which reaches a height of 10,164 feet (3,098 meters).
  • Merengue is the national dance of the Dominican Republic and is a fast-paced music and dance style that originated in the country.
  • The Dominican Republic is known for its production of rum, which is a major export of the country.
  • The capital city of Santo Domingo is the oldest continuously inhabited city in the New World, with a history dating back over 500 years.
  • The Dominican Republic is home to a diverse range of wildlife, including manatees, hawksbill turtles, and the endangered Hispaniolan solenodon.
  • The country’s national bird is the palmchat , a small yellow bird with a distinctive crested head.
  • The Dominican Republic has a unique fusion cuisine that blends African, European, and indigenous influences, with dishes such as sancocho, mangu, and chicharrones.

Lets finish up this article about tourism in the Dominican Republic by answering some of the most common questions on the topic. Here are 10 frequently asked questions about tourism in the Dominican Republic:

  • Is the Dominican Republic safe for tourists?

Yes, the Dominican Republic is generally considered safe for tourists. However, it is important to take precautions, such as avoiding carrying large sums of cash, staying in well-lit areas, and using licensed taxis.

  • What is the best time to visit the Dominican Republic?

The best time to visit the Dominican Republic is from November to April, when the weather is generally dry and sunny and tourism in the Dominican Republic is at its peak.

  • What is the currency in the Dominican Republic?

The currency in the Dominican Republic is the Dominican peso.

  • What language is spoken in the Dominican Republic?

The official language of the Dominican Republic is Spanish, although many people also speak English.

  • Do I need a visa to visit the Dominican Republic?

Visa requirements for the Dominican Republic vary depending on your country of citizenship. Many visitors can enter the country for up to 90 days without a visa.

  • What are some popular tourist attractions in the Dominican Republic?

Popular tourist attractions in the Dominican Republic include Punta Cana, Santo Domingo, Samaná Peninsula, and Puerto Plata.

  • What is the tipping etiquette in the Dominican Republic?

Tipping is expected in the Dominican Republic, with a standard rate of around 10% in restaurants and for other services.

  • What is the electrical voltage in the Dominican Republic?

The electrical voltage in the Dominican Republic is 110-120 volts, the same as in the United States and Canada.

  • Is it safe to drink tap water in the Dominican Republic?

It is generally not recommended to drink tap water in the Dominican Republic. Bottled water is widely available.

  • What is the dress code in the Dominican Republic?

The dress code in the Dominican Republic is generally casual, although more formal attire may be required for some restaurants and events. Beachwear is generally only appropriate on the beach or at a pool.

As you can see, tourism in the Dominican Republic is big business. Its beautiful coastline and spectacular resorts make this a popular tourism destination for many. However, if tourism in the Dominican Republic is to remain a key income generator, it is essential that sustainable tourism principles are adopted.

Now that you know more about tourism in the Dominican Republic, why not take a look at these articles too:

  • Tourism in Las Vegas- A Comprehensive Guide
  • Tourism in West Virginia- A Detailed Guide
  • Tourism in Puerto Rico: A Comprehensive Overview
  • Tourism in Thailand- A Detailed Overview

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25 Interesting and Fun Facts About the Dominican Republic

Facts About Dominican Republic Pin

The Dominican Republic boasts an incredible history, fascinating nature, and peculiar traditions.

In this guide, I’ll share with you 25 interesting and fun facts about the Dominican Republic , gathered during my extensive travels to the tropical paradise.

Think sea exploration, colonial architecture, and surprising beverages. You’ll find all these and more in the lines below.

Ready to explore the Dominican Republic beyond its amazing beaches ?

Let’s dive in!

Disclaimer : This post contains  affiliate links .  If you purchase something through one of them, I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you for helping me create free content on this website!

Interesting Historical Facts About the Dominican Republic

Santo Domingo Dominican Republic

Let’s kick off with the most interesting facts about the Dominican Republic’s history .

  • Christopher Columbus landed on the island in 1492. He and his men established the first permanent European settlement in the Americas, Santo Domingo. This marked the beginning of a new era in history, as European influence spread across the continent.
  • Santo Domingo is North and South America’s first capital city. It hosts the oldest cathedral, university, and hospital in the Americas. The Old Town (Zona Colonial) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site . The well-preserved area shows the architectural and cultural heritage of the Dominican Republic. This fact alone makes the city worth visiting. You can explore it on a day trip from Punta Cana .
  • The Dominican flag is one of the oldest flags in the world. It dates back to 1844, boasting a rich history and unique symbolism. Its design features a centered white cross dividing the flag into four rectangles. The national coat of arms is at its center. The coat of arms features the Holy Bible, reflecting the nation’s deep-rooted Christian faith and heritage.

Facts about the Dominican Republic Header

  • Santo Domingo’s Cathedral, Santa María la Menor, is the oldest cathedral in the Americas. Diego Columbus, Christopher Columbus’ son, built it in the 16 th century. Its majestic architecture and historical significance will spellbind you. Nowadays, the cathedral is on the UNESCO World Heritage list .
  • The Columbus Lighthouse in Santo Domingo is believed to house the remains of Christopher Columbus. The iconic landmark serves as a testament to the legacy of the explorer and his role in shaping the history of the Americas.
  • The national motto, Dios, Patria, Libertad (God, Homeland, Liberty), reflects the country’s principles and ideals. It encapsulates a deep sense of patriotism and commitment to freedom. You can read it on top of the Dominican coats of arms written on a blue ribbon. The name of the country, Republica Dominicana , is featured on a red ribbon at the bottom.

Fun Geography and Nature Facts About the Dominican Republic

Jarabacoa Dominican Republic Travel Tips

Next, I’ll share with you the most fascinating facts about Dominican Republic’s nature and geography . Because, you know, the Caribbean country isn’t just gorgeous secluded beaches .

  • The Dominican Republic shares the island of Hispaniola with the Republic of Haiti. The shared heritage brings a unique blend of traditions and influences that enrich the culture of both nations. A surprising fact is that the two countries speak different languages.
  • The country is home to the highest peak and the lowest point in the Caribbean. Pico Duarte rises majestically 3,098 m / 10,164 ft. above the sea level. It’s a symbol of the country’s natural beauty, and offers breathtaking views of the Dominican highlands. Meanwhile, Lake Enriquillo lies 39 m / 129 ft. below sea level. The gorgeous lake is nestled in a picturesque valley, and provides a serene oasis amid the tropical terrain.
  • The country is a leader in environmental and sustainable tourism. A significant portion of the land is designated as national parks and reserves. The commitment to conservation ensures the preservation of the country’s natural wonders. It also promotes responsible tourism practices that minimize environmental impact.
  • The official language of the Dominican Republic is Spanish. African languages and Taino, the language of the indigenous people, influenced Dominican Spanish. For this reason, it features unique slang words and expressions. English, Italian, German, and French are also spoken in tourist areas. This means that you can easily communicate and immerse yourself in the vibrant culture of the Dominican Republic.

Language Dominican Republic Travel Tips

  • The gemstone larimar is only found in the Dominican Republic. It’s considered the Dominican national stone and a symbol of the country’s natural beauty and heritage. Larimar is a rare blue variety of the mineral pectolite. Its unique coloration and quality are exclusive to the Dominican Republic. The gemstone will captivate you with its mesmerizing blue hues. Jewelry with larimar stones is one of the best vacation souvenirs you can bring home.
  • The Dominican Republic is also renowned for its production of amber. The Amber Museum in Puerto Plata offers visitors a fascinating glimpse into the geological history of the region. You can marvel at exquisite pieces of amber, including the one featured in the movie Jurassic Park. You know, the one that had the dinosaur’s DNA.
  • The Dominican Republic boasts the largest economy in the Caribbean and Central American region. The country drives growth and development in the area. Its economic strength has positioned the Dominican Republic as a key player in the global marketplace. This attracts investments and fosters innovation across many sectors. As a result, the Dominican Republic thrives as a dynamic hub, offering great opportunities for business and trade.
  • The national flower is the Bayahibe Rose and the national tree is the West Indian Mahogany . These symbols reflect the lush landscapes and rich biodiversity of the Dominican Republic. You can encounter the endemic plants in botanical gardens, national parks, and protected areas around the country.
  • The national bird, the Palmchat , is unique to the Dominican Republic. It resides in lush palm trees. You’ll recognize it by its distinctive appearance and melodic chirps. Palmchats are remarkable architects. The birds are known for their intricate communal nests, which can host multiple breeding pairs.

Astonishing Cultural Facts About the Dominican Republic

Dominican Lunch

The vibrant blend of people and traditions has shaped the unique culture of the Caribbean island republic. In my humble opinion, these are the most fun cultural Dominican Republic facts .

  • The Dominican culinary scene will leave you salivating. No visit to the Dominican Republic is complete without indulging in its rich gastronomical heritage. Try the traditional dishes sancocho (a hearty stew of meats and vegetables), mangú (a flavorful green plantains mash), and mofongo (a savory dish of fried plantains, garlic, and pork rinds). Don’t miss the scrumptious fresh seafood, prepared on open-fire grills directly on the beach. Finish your decadent culinary journey by savoring tropical fruits or the iconic tres leches cake. 
  • Baseball is more than just a sport in the Dominican Republic. It’s a way of life. With passionate fans and a deep-rooted love for the game, baseball unites communities and serves as a source of national pride. The most famous Dominican baseball players include Sammy Sosa, Albert Pujols, Juan Marichal, Vladimir Guerrero, and Pedro Martinez.
  • Merengue and bachata stem from the Dominican Republic. The country’s contribution to the world of music and dance is one of its most iconic cultural exports. The infectious rhythms and energetic movements will enchant you. Merengue and bachata are not just musical styles but also cultural expressions of the nation’s identity.
  • Mamajuana is known as the Dominican Viagra. The traditional drink is crafted by soaking tree bark and aromatic herbs in red wine or rum. The beverage is often infused with honey for sweetness. The flavorful elixir tastes like pure drops of heaven. Dominicans also swear by its aphrodisiac powers. Whether or not you believe them, you should try the signature drink.
  • The Dominican Republic is a favorite filming location for moviemakers. Santo Domingo, for example, has captivated the imagination of giants like Francis Ford Coppola. The city’s picturesque streets and colonial architecture are the perfect backdrop for iconic scenes in the first two parts of The Godfather. Other great movies shot in the country include Apocalypse Now, Jurassic Park, The Good Shepherd, Miami Vice, Nyad, The Lost City, and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.

Sunday Afternoon At A Dominican Cockfight Ring

  • The population of the Dominican Republic is as diverse as its nature. Dominicans are descendants of African, European, and indigenous Taíno people. According to genetic studies, the average DNA has about 73% European, 17% African, and 10% Native American blood. With a median age of around 27 years, the nation is relatively young.
  • In a town in the Dominican Republic, gravity seems to work in reverse. In Polo in the Barahona Province, cars parked on a mountainside near the village seem to roll uphill. Locals called the spot El Polo Magnético (the Magnetic Pole). However, the phenomenon is not caused by a magnetic field. It’s an optical illusion tricking the eye into thinking the hill goes up instead of down. It’s still worth checking out, though.
  • The Dominican police officers are not only committed to public safety but also extremely friendly. There’s one thing you shouldn’t do in front of them, though, and that’s public displays of affection. Cultural norms dictate that kissing and making out are deemed inappropriate in the presence of police officers.
  • One of the most iconic fashion designers was born in Santo Domingo. The visionary Oscar de la Renta started his journey from the Dominican capital. His elegant designs showcasing his talent and creativity skyrocketed him to the top of the fashion world. Celebrities like Jackie Kennedy, Hillary Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, Penelope Cruz, and Rihanna have graced red carpets, magazine covers, and prestigious events wearing his creations.
  • It’s always “5 o’clock” in the Dominican Republic. Having a refreshing drink is not limited to specific times or days. It’s a part of daily life. Whether sipping on a cold beer at a beach bar or savoring a tropical cocktail under the stars, the relaxed attitude towards alcohol makes the Caribbean country the perfect vacation destination. This must be one of my favorite Dominican Republic facts.

Which Dominican Republic Facts Surprised You the Most?

And there you have it – the 25 most interesting and fun facts about the Dominican Republic .

From its turbulent past to its gorgeous nature, the tropical island will fascinate you.

With this guide, and my best Dominican Republic travel tips , you’ll be ready for an adventure of a lifetime.

Now, tell me:

Which of the fun facts about the Dominican Republic surprised you the most?

Let me know in the comments below.

After spending months living in Spain and the USA, years in Germany, and decades in Bulgaria, I set up on a mission to find the most epic road trips, the best beaches, and the most authentic local experiences for your next adventure.

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16 Top Attractions & Things to Do in the Dominican Republic

Written by Lana Law and Michael Law Updated Apr 6, 2023

Authors Michael and Lana Law live part of each year in the Dominican Republic and have traveled the country extensively.

Postcard-perfect beaches, luxury resorts, and a solid tourism infrastructure are the main reasons people visit the Dominican Republic. This, combined with lush forests, mountains, and even semi-desert creates unique opportunities for travelers who want more than a simple beach vacation. Things to do off the beach can include exploring waterfalls, hiking, visiting mountain villages, or wandering historical city centers.

A beach on the Amber Coast

The beach resorts of Punta Cana, Puerto Plata , and La Romana offer what many packaged vacationers are looking for: a tropical escape designed for relaxation. This is where you'll find most of the Dominican Republic's all-inclusive resorts.

Independent travelers who want to escape from this scene can head to remote areas of the country, like the Samaná Peninsula , the mountainous interior, or the less tourist-focused towns and cities. Surfers and kiteboarders will find exactly what they're looking for in places like Cabarete.

No place in the Caribbean delivers on history quite like the colonial zone in Santo Domingo. This city is a must-see, and it is also a major hub with direct flights around the world. It's a great place to start or end a trip. The Dominican Republic's new airline, Arajet , offers discount fares on direct flights to cities throughout South America and eastern Canada.

Immerse yourself in nature, find secluded beaches, and learn about the culture with our list of the top attractions and things to do in the Dominican Republic.

1. Plan a Vacation to the Resort Destination of Punta Cana

2. visit puerto plata & playa dorada, 3. walk through santo domingo's zona colonial, 4. enjoy the beaches and beachside restaurants in cabarete, 5. lounge on the beaches in las galeras, 6. kiteboard on cabarete's kite beach, 7. go whale watching in samaná bay, 8. visit las terrenas, 9. 27 waterfalls of damajagua (27 charcos), 10. bahia de las aguilas, 11. isla saona and parque nacional de este, 12. jarabacoa, 13. la romana, 14. cable car (teleferico) in puerto plata, 15. the three eyes national park, 16. los haitises national park, the dominican republic - climate chart.

Bavaro Beach, Punta Cana

Where an endless stretch of beautiful white-sand beach meets the emerald waters of the Caribbean is Punta Cana, the Dominican Republic's premiere resort destination . If you are looking for luxury all-inclusive resorts , a couple's retreat, or family-friendly resorts combined with an unending list of water-based activities for entertainment, this is the best place to visit in the Dominican Republic.

Bavaro Beach is Punta Cana's most impressive stretch of beach, where you can wade into the water or walk for hours along the sand. Resorts line the beach and offer easy access to all the activities. This is not a place to come for a quiet getaway.

The ocean is a flurry of activity, with boats, parasailers, and sightseeing tour boats coming and going. Roped-off areas offer safe places to swim. Inland from the beach are a smattering of restaurants and retail, most of which are very modern, especially by Dominican Republic standards.

Playa Dorada

Along the north coast, looking out over the Atlantic Ocean, the resort destination of Puerto Plata and the beautiful stretch of beach known as Playa Dorada is one of the Dominican Republic's biggest tourist draws . This golden-sand beach is lined with luxury resorts, although much less densely packed than what you'll find in Punta Cana.

This area is also much more subdued and has more of a tranquil feel. The beaches are not busy with boats and water sports, although it's a beautiful area for swimming or snorkeling. You can walk beyond the resorts to undeveloped beaches backed by palm trees and forest.

Pink Street in Puerto Plata

Take a day and head into Puerto Plata's city center to explore the colorful streets and historical attractions. Highlights in Puerto Plata include Pink Street, Umbrella Street, Central Park, and Fort San Felipe.

Calle el Conde, Santo Domingo

In this city, where Christopher Columbus first landed in the America's , you'll find the hustle and bustle of modern day life being played out against the backdrop of centuries-old buildings. The colonial architecture, much of which today houses museums, restaurants, shops, and quaint hotels, lines the streets and squares, and takes you back to another era in mind-blowing fashion.

Much of the activity focuses around Calle El Conde , the main thoroughfare and a popular street for shopping or dining el fresco. Wandering around the various streets, you'll see crumbling ruins, like those of Monesterio de San Francisco; beautifully preserved buildings, such as the Catedral Primada de América (First Cathedral in the Americas), which is still in use today; and residential areas, offering a glimpse into local life.

Even eating pizza in a restored colonial building on a hot night, or lounging in the courtyard of your 450-year-old hotel can feel like a unique experience in this beautiful city. Santo Domingo is definitely a place worth spending some time.

Read More: Top-Rated Tourist Attractions & Things to Do in Santo Domingo

Cabarete, main beach

Cabarete is a laid-back beach town. It's known for its relaxed atmosphere and huge, crescent-shaped beach lined with casual restaurants where visitors can dine right on the sand.

Unlike the Dominican Republic's resort destinations like Punta Cana or Puerto Plata, this town is not full of all-inclusive resorts and packaged-vacation tourists. Instead, Cabarete attracts free spirits, backpackers, retirees, and kiteboarders and surfers who come here to spend a few weeks or months, particularly during the winter.

Beach to the east of downtown Cabarete

If you are staying in nearby Puerto Plata you can day trip to Cabarete to spend a day on the beach, enjoy a meal, or do some shopping. In the early evenings, especially on weekends and Tuesdays, musicians often perform in the local beachfront restaurants and provide entertainment as the sun sets.

To the east and west of town are long stretches of beautiful beaches lined by palm trees. This natural setting is perfect for peaceful walks.

Las Galeras

At the farthest tip of the Samaná Peninsula , where the road dead ends at the ocean, looking out over one of the area's many beautiful beaches, is the small town of Las Galeras. Its remote location will appeal to independent travelers looking for an off-the-beaten-path experience. Palm-lined, white-sand beaches and turquoise water create an idyllic scene.

Beaches like Playa Rincon, La Playita, Playa Fronton , and other unnamed stretches of undeveloped beaches in the area are some of the best beaches in the Dominican Republic and offer the polar opposite experience of the major resort destinations on the island. Here, you can hire a boat to take you to a remote beach for a morning or afternoon, or walk from town to several beautiful sandy coves in the surrounding area.

The town itself has only one main street but restaurants along here, many operated by French expats, offer outstanding cuisine at backpacker prices. Restaurants in the surrounding mountains or along the oceanfront cliffs, which require a drive from town, provide more great options.

Las Galeras is the perfect place to get away from busy streets and the tourist scene, while still offering enough infrastructure to make you comfortable.

Kite Beach, Cabarete

Cabarete is known around the world as a kiteboarding destination . The center of the action is on Kite Beach, just around a headland from Cabarete's main beach. It's about a 20-minute walk along the beach from the center of town to Kite Beach.

This small area of Cabarete has its own unique vibe. In the mornings, the beach is quiet, with the exception of walkers and runners or people swimming and stand up paddleboarding. In the afternoon, when the winds pick up, kiteboarders descend on the beach, and the sky fills with kites.

Big wave day at Kite Beach in Cabarete

The sand is a riot of colors with kites waiting for the best winds to materialize. A few restaurants along here offer casual food right along the water's edge.

Cabarete and nearby Encuentro Beach host the annual Master of the Ocean competition in February, where the best in the world come to compete in kitesurfing, windsurfing, surfing, and stand up paddleboarding. This is a great time to see some incredible kiting on Kite Beach.

If you are interested in taking up this sport yourself, numerous schools offer lessons and hotels cater to kiters. See our article on learning to kiteboard: lessons, schools, and where to stay on Kite Beach.

Surfing is another popular activity in Cabarete. Most of the surfing is centered at Encuentro , another beautiful stretch of beach just outside town. Many people head out to Encuentro for surfing in the morning, then move down to Kite Beach for kiteboarding in the afternoon, and eventually end up on Cabarete's main beach for a little nightlife.

Humpback whale in Samaná Bay

Each winter, from December through March , thousands of humpback whales enter Samaná Bay to mate and give birth, making this one of the best places to see these beautiful giants in the wild. The city of Samaná, on the Samaná Peninsula, is the main departure point for Whale Watching trips.

The city itself holds little else for travelers, but the whales are such a popular tourist attraction, many companies offer day trips here from various destinations around the island. If you are passing through on your way to Las Galeras, of if you are based in nearby Las Terrenas, less than an hour away, you can stop in Samaná and sign up for a tour. If you are staying in Punta Cana, full day whale watching tours are also available.

Coconut seller in Las Terrenas

On the north coast, Las Terrenas is a busy Dominican city with a peaceful and laid-back beachfront area, where winding, single-lane dirt roads meander past small French cafés and lookout over palms, beaches, and the aquamarine ocean. Just a short stroll inland takes you to the motorbike-filled streets, where Dominicans are going about work and everyday life.

This is one of the best places to visit if you want a taste of Dominican culture and all the conveniences of a city, combined with a great beach destination. Like Las Galeras, many French people have made Las Terrenas their home and have set up restaurants and inns.

27 Waterfalls of Damajagua

If you are looking for adventure, one of the most interesting things to do in the Dominican Republic, is to climb up a narrow gorge of waterfalls and then jump off the top of each one into the pools below. This attraction is not for the faint of heart, it's a serious undertaking, but incredibly fun.

You'll be outfitted with a lifejacket and a helmet and led by a qualified guide who will take you up a series of ladders . As you ascend, you'll be able to watch other visitors fly past you on their descent. It's nonstop action and mayhem. Some of the drops are quite high, but you can always change your mind in any given section and take the ladder back down.

The falls are near Puerto Plata, and most people go on an organized tour from Cabarete, Sosua, and Puerto Plata.

If you have your own transport, you can also do this on your own, but guides are mandatory and can be arranged at the falls. You need to be able to swim and not be afraid of heights.

Bahia de Las Aguilas

Well off the major tourist route, the remote Bahia de Las Aguillas in Jaragua National Park is a glorious eight-kilometer stretch of beach , which you may have all to yourself on any given day. The shallow, clear, calm water and white-sand bottom, combined with a distinct lack of tourism and development, make this one of the most pristine beaches in the Dominican Republic.

Located on the southwestern coast of the country, close to the border with Haiti, this area is isolated, to say the least. From Santo Domingo, the drive time is at least six hours . The nearest town to the beach is Pedernales, almost an hour away by car, and the tourism infrastructure in this part of the Dominican is some of the least developed in the country.

You won't find luxury resorts, but you will find tranquility, solitude, and unique experiences if you come out this way. The climate here is semi-arid, and the landscape, which consists largely of cactus and scrub, is much different than other areas of the country.

Isla Saona

While Parque Nacional del Este, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a serene place of natural beauty and habitat for countless plants, animals, and birds, most people know the park for the beaches of Isla Saona. This island is a tourist magnet, with all kinds of day trippers from the nearby resort destinations of Punta Cana and La Romana.

The soft-sand beach and turquoise water are what most people would imagine if they were to picture a tropical island paradise. But, despite the fact that there are no resorts on the island, it is a lively destination during the day as catamarans and speedboats drop tourists on the beaches to relax in lounge chairs and soak up the sun.

If you are tired of the scene in Punta Cana and looking for an outing, you can hop on a Saona Island Day Trip from Punta Cana. A small speedboat will whisk you over to the island for a day of relaxing on the beach and playing in the shallow waters.

Jarabacoa

While many Dominican vacationers consider Jarabacoa a summer retreat destination, foreign travelers tend to see it as an outdoor adventure playground in the mountains of the Dominican Republic's interior. In the vicinity are opportunities for rafting, hiking, biking , and other types of exploration.

At an elevation of over 500 meters, the climate here is much milder than the coast and nights are often cool. If you are spending more than just a week or two in the country, it's worth venturing up to Jarabacoa. This town also makes a convenient stop for a couple of nights if you are traveling between Santo Domingo and either Puerto Plata or Cabarete.

Altos de Chavon, La Romana

Not far from Punta Cana, La Romana is one of the Dominican's resort destinations . This area has a number of large resorts, some of which are geared towards more independent travelers looking to self-cater. However, the number of resorts here is not nearly on the same scale as Punta Cana. Beautiful beaches in the area are the main draw.

One of the most popular things to do here is visit the Altos de Chavón , where you can shop for crafters and souvenirs in a replica of a 16th-century artisan's village. The village is set off on its own, but you can join an organized shopping trip if you don't have your own transportation.

Not far from La Romana is Bayahibe, a fishing town with a public beach and the departure point for trips to Isla Saona. You can also day trip from La Romana to Santo Domingo, about 1.5 hours away. Golfing is another popular activity in the area.

Cable car in Puerto Plata

An ideal way to get a bird's-eye view of the northern coast of the Dominican Republic is to take a ride up the cable car in Puerto Plata. Ascending nearly 800 meters from the steamy heat of sea level, the cable car whisks you up to the top of Pico Isabel de Torres where you'll find the air pleasantly cool.

Take a little while to wander around the top and see the statue of Christ the Redeemer. The views out over the surrounding countryside are spectacular. Places to look for include Sousa, Cabarete, and the windmills on the hills beyond Puerto Plata.

It's best to go early in the day, as it tends to get cloudy as the day progresses.

Three Eyes National Park

Should you find yourself in Santo Domingo with a free day, it would be best spent making the short trip to the Three Eyes National Park. This fascinating park has been the site of several jungle adventure movies, and once you visit, you'll see why.

Descend below the surface of the earth along a series of staircases into a limestone cave and emerge beneath a tangle of vines at the first of three crystal-clear pools. It's these small lakes that give the park its name. Pathways lead from pool to pool , and if you want a bit of added adventure, pay a bit extra for a short boat ride to the farthest one.

Trails also lead around the top of the caves, providing glimpses down into the caverns. The Three Eyes National Park is easy to reach — it's only about a 15-minute drive from the old town of Santo Domingo.

Limestone pinnacles in Los Haitises National Park

Somewhat reminiscent of the limestone pinnacles in places like Thailand, Los Haitises National Park is a green and verdant paradise. Limestone islands with 100-foot-high peaks covered in dense greenery rise directly from the surface of the water

The area, best explored in kayaks or small boats , is a wonderful place to see wildlife, especially birds. Species spotted include woodpeckers, hawks, pelicans, and herons among many others.

The limestone geology is rife with caves, some of which were used by the ancient Taino tribes, who left their marks with pictographs. Some caves even have small beaches in them, ideal for taking a cooling swim as this is a hot and humid area of the country.

Another fascinating area to explore are the mangrove tunnels, places that can be calm, quiet, and sometimes a bit eerie. Los Haitises National Park is usually reached via boat from the city of Samana.

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Bike riders on a joyride through the countryside of Dominican Republic.

Get off the beaten path and explore the Dominican Republic's less developed natural enclaves © B Cruz / Shutterstock

Rollicking turquoise waves, swaying palms and some of the finest rum on the planet – the Dominican Republic is just as famous for its natural beauty as it is for the abundant all-inclusive resorts that call the island home. 

While there’s no shortage of places with swim-up bars built for serene weeks of lounging by the water, getting off hotel property is one of the best ways to truly take in the Dominican experience. 

Spending some time in major cities – like Santo Domingo and Santiago de los Caballeros – is ideal for sampling the island culture, while getting off the beaten path and exploring less developed natural enclaves will reward you with waterfalls, whale watching and flora-filled rainforest hikes. 

Traveling from region to region is fairly common – you’ll find Dominicans commuting for business, going to visit family in the country or navigating their way to school. Taxis can be found just about everywhere, and ride-sharing services are available in the three major cities: Santo Domingo, Santiago and Puerto Plata . Public transportation in the form of bus service is both an affordable and memorable way to experience island life. 

If you aren't sure where to begin exploring everything the Dominican Republic has to offer, here's a list of eight can't-miss sites.

Aerial view of two people walking down a tropical island beach

1. Punta Cana is best for casinos and resort life

When most people think of the Dominican Republic, it’s Punta Cana  they have in mind. It’s the resort capital of the island, with an avalanche of all-inclusives catering to the bottomless-bar set. 

But beyond the tourist-focused, theme park–level accommodations, Punta Cana plays host to beaches that rival some of the Caribbean 's best. Punta Cana’s 97km (60 miles) of coastline face both Atlantic and Caribbean waters, inviting you to hop on a catamaran, go deep-sea fishing or get lost in a book while baking under the warm sun. 

The area also has a vibrant party scene that pulsates late into the night, thanks to the various resorts’ casinos and clubs.

2. Santo Domingo is best for culture buffs

The gritty hustle and bustle of city life collide with vibrant Dominican culture in the island’s capital (“El Capital”), Santo Domingo . It’s one of the Caribbean’s oldest cities, making it ideal for history aficionados looking to explore colonial-era architecture and take a deep dive into the country’s past. 

You'll find the Zona Colonial in the city's center, which the island's oldest church, European fortress, monastery, university and hospital all call home. But step outside the cobblestone streets of the Zona, and a metropolitan joyride awaits, with elegant restaurants, raucous nightclubs and plenty of cultural institutions to add to your itinerary.

Reserve a table at the elegant El Mesón de la Cava for dinner in an ancient Taino cave, and afterward, hit the edgy, strobe-lit club  Jet Set ;  Onno’s , a local bar chain, is also a popular spot for a casual night of beer and cocktails.

Do I need a visa to visit the Dominican Republic?  

A closeup of a humpback whale tail off the coast near Samana in the Dominican Republic

3. Samaná is best for whale watching

The Samaná Peninsula is where the unspoiled natural beauty of the Dominican Republic mingles with friendly small-town sensibilities – a stark contrast to the glitzy resorts of Punta Cana and the bustling grind of Santo Domingo. 

The capital of this peninsular province is the eponymous Samaná, located in northern Samaná Bay. Eco-tourism is popular here, with one major star attraction: whales. The best time to go is between January and March, when thousands of humpback whales descend upon the bay to give birth to their calves. 

El Museo de las Ballenas (Whale Museum) in the neighboring town of Salinas is an attraction in its own right, with guided tours of marine mammal exhibits, handcrafted souvenirs and a full 12m (40-ft) skeleton of a humpback whale found along the rocky coastline between Las Galeras and Santa Bárbara de Samaná in 1993.

4. Sosúa is best for late-night partying

By day, Sosúa is your typical sleepy beach town – large swaths of sandy shores gently lapped by the Atlantic’s cerulean waves. It’s also the island’s dairy and cheese capital, courtesy of a 1938 presidential decree that allowed 100,000 Jewish refugees to settle in the area.

Some 800 people took the offer and launched a dairy and cheese factory, many of whose products you can purchase today. 

While this all seems quite bucolic and mellow, Sosúa by night is an entirely different beast. After dark, the main strip (Calle Pedro Clisante) closes off to traffic, and revelers spill out onto the streets from the resident bars, lounges and nightclubs,  many of which feature local live music, including the Blue Ice Piano Bar and the popular Jolly Roger . 

But a word of caution: the area is also known for sex tourism. Dominican and Haitian sex workers are known to approach and proposition tourists in the area, so practice a fair amount of caution.

The 12 best beaches in the Dominican Republic  

A closeup of a woman kiteboarding in the ocean

5. Cabarete is best for thrill seekers

Sure, sipping cocktails by the beach is nice. But there’s only so much relaxing you can do, right? When you’re ready to shift your vacation into high gear , set your coordinates for Cabarete , a beach town located on the Caribbean coast of the Dominican Republic. 

Founded in 1835 by a British merchant and former enslaver, Cabarete is now an adrenaline junkie’s dream, a haven for kayakers, snorkelers and wind and kite surfers (several international competitions are hosted here). It’s also a popular spot for avid surfers, thanks to some of the best winds and tides in the Caribbean.

A woman standing in front of the cascading El Limón waterfall

6. El Limón waterfall is the perfect adventurous hike

Tighten your shoelaces and summon your balance – the 2.4km (1.5-mile) trail to get to  Cascada El Limón  is mostly wet and rocky terrain that visitors traverse on horseback. But it can also be accessed by foot – you’ll cross rivers and hop over muddy rocks to make it to your destination, so be sure to pack some rubber footwear. 

After a 30 to 60-minute walk or horseback ride from the small town of El Limón, you’ll arrive at your destination – a spectacular 46m (150-ft) waterfall that flows into the cool waters of an expansive swimming hole. You can book a tour with one of the companies in Las Terrenas , a 30-minute drive from El Limón; the excursion typically includes a guide, horse and lunch. 

7. Bayahibe is best for scuba diving

Situated on the Caribbean coast of the Dominican Republic, Bayahibe is a former fishing village turned quiet resort town with access to some of the island’s most lively (and spectacular) beaches. 

Just a few miles from town, you’ll find Bayahibe Beach , Dominicus Beach and boat launches that ferry you to Isla Saona , a national park that’s more booze-cruise layover than uninhabited sanctuary. Your best bet: stay in Bayahibe and take advantage of one of some 20 different dive sites in the area – it’s one of the most active areas for scuba divers in the country. If scuba diving isn’t in the cards, try your hand at stand-up paddleboarding or snorkeling the reefs instead. 

8. Jarabacoa offers mountainous hikes and whitewater river rafting

Jarabacoa is the antithesis of the Dominican Republic’s oceanside towns. So when you’ve had your fill of lounging on the beach, head to Jarabacoa’s soaring peaks for verdant hikes, whitewater rafting on a roaring river and warm mugs of irresistible Dominican coffee on cool, misty mountain mornings. 

Known as the City of Everlasting Spring, Jarabacoa has no shortage of activities: waterfall hikes, rope-bridge crossings over the Jimenoa River, plentiful rounds of golf and visits to the Cistercian monastery of Santa Maria del Evangelio. 

The area is also home to the Ebano Verde Scientific Reserve , where more than 600 species of flora and fauna populate one of the most humid areas on the island (you can arrange a tour of the reserve before you visit). Jarabacao is also known for its Carnaval festivities in February – one of the most famous celebrations in the Dominican Republic.

You might also like: 5 can’t-miss Dominican Republic road trips The 7 best hikes in the Dominican Republic Getting around from beach to beach in the Dominican Republic

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Dominican Republic: a tourism success story

The caribbean nation, which has vaccinated all hotel workers, is now receiving more bookings than it was before the pandemic in 2019.

Hugo Gutiérrez

It is easy to forget about the coronavirus on the sandy beaches of the Dominican Republic. Peter, a German tourist who has turned a deep shade of pink over his two-week holiday, is fully vaccinated and only sorry today is the last of his trip. “This is paradise. It feels like there is no pandemic here,” he said. For the health-conscious who nonetheless want to travel, the pull of a vacation largely spent outdoors on a beach is strong, especially when everyone you are likely to meet has already been inoculated.

The Dominican Republic is leading the recovery of tourism in the Caribbean, driven by strong demand from US travelers. Almost 60% of Americans are fully vaccinated, and one of the effects is a stampede to go abroad and make up for lost time. By the end of May, the Dominican Republic saw a 10% increase in travelers booking to arrive in July than for the same dates in 2019, before the pandemic upended all travel .

There is pent-up demand that is now emerging. We expect the same to happen in other tourist destinations such as Spain Alejandro Reynal, CEO of Apple Leisure Group

The Caribbean nation is a beacon of hope for places like Spain and Greece in Europe, which rely strongly on tourism but are still waiting for vaccination campaigns on the continent to yield results for the sector. The concern now is whether this will happen in time to save the summer 2021 season, following the disaster of 2020, though at this point many businesses are clinging on for survival.

At 9am in Las Terrenas, in the northeast of the country, a dozen tourists are already sunbathing, while others enjoy breakfast on the Bahia Principe Grand El Portillo Hotel beachfront. The scene could be from 2019, but it is from 2021. Coronavirus safety measures are, however, in place. There are daily temperature checks at the hotel, face masks must be worn in busy areas and there is hydroalcoholic gel in abundance. The Dominican Republic no longer requires visitors to present a negative PCR test, though many visitors require them to get back home, and random tests are carried out in the main international airports.

What’s more, most of the people tourists are likely to come into contact with have been immunized. “All hotel workers have been vaccinated to guarantee the safety of the [tourism] sector. If tourism takes a step forward, we all do, because many families survive from the industry,” the president of the Dominican Republic, Luis Abinar, told media on a trip organized by Spanish tourism consortium Grupo Piñero. Abinader also emphasized that the recovery is already underway: “By the end of 2021 we will have similar numbers [in arrivals and spending] as before the Covid crisis,” he said.

The country’s tourism minister, David Collado, explained that the direct and indirect proceeds of tourism account for 22% of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP). “For us, tourism is not a luxury, it spearheads our economy. It is good news that for July reservations are already at record levels, especially from the United States market,” he said. “International reservations for the Punta Cana-Bavaro area are already 37% higher than last year’s figures,” added Samuel Pereyra, general manager of state bank Banreservas.

Hotels fully booked

Hotel companies share in the sense of optimism and believe the strong numbers will be sustained into the second half of the year. “There are already fully booked hotels and they are asking us to raise the maximum occupancy allowed, which is now at 80%,” Collado said. Occupancy was lower overall in the first six months of 2021, but this is expected to change. The Bahia Principe hotel chain had 25% more tourists from the United States in the year up to June than in the same period of 2019. “With what has been booked so far, we are already up 50%,” said Encarna Piñero, CEO of Grupo Piñero. Punta Cana is at the maximum occupancy levels allowed by the pandemic.

Meanwhile, Sophia, from Orlando, Florida, is enjoying herself. “I am already vaccinated and I had a few weeks off, so I came without thinking twice. And by the end of the year I want to come back,” she said, speaking from a Grupo Piñero resort in Punta Cana.

(l-r) Tourism Minister David Collado, Grupo Piñero CEO Encarna Piñero and president of Dominican Republic President Luis Abinader.

American chain Apple Leisure Group (ALG) is in a similar situation. Throughout the Caribbean, the firm recorded a 40.45% increase in bookings between March 14 and May 23 when compared with the same dates in 2019. Alejandro Reynal, ALG’s managing director, expects this to be repeated worldwide: “There is pent-up demand that is now emerging. We expect the same to happen in other tourist destinations such as Spain .”

The Dominican Republic’s main tourism markets are the United States (more than two million tourists in 2019), Canada (almost 900,000), France and Russia (more than 200,000), as well as Argentina, Germany and Spain (close to 200,000), according to the Dominican Republic’s central bank. Among the thousands of tourists who plan to visit this year is Mercedes Romera, from Dos Hermanas in Spain’s Seville region. “I’m going with my parents, my husband and my two children. We are already vaccinated, except for the children, and we wanted a quiet place like Samaná, where there are hardly any infections and the workers are vaccinated.”

In spite of the optimism, the Dominican government remains cautious about the next setbacks the coronavirus pandemic might throw up. Overall this year will still be down on 2019′s takings, and full normality is not expected until 2022.

Investment plan

The Dominican government has also announced a raft of measures to improve tourism, including beach facilities ($10 million, €8.46 million), measures to combat algae ($12 million, €10.15 million with the private sector), beach regeneration ($70 million, €59.19 million with the Inter-American Investment Bank) and revamping cultural sites ($90 million, €76 million). Further measures include eliminating taxes on domestic flights in order to promote domestic tourism, which went from accounting for 3% to 35% of the sector last year – a rise largely explained by the 68% drop in international tourism. A new route between Madrid and Samaná will also open in July, operated by Air Europa.

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The Fact File

65 Interesting Facts About Dominican Republic

Last updated on April 13th, 2023

The Dominican Republic is the 86 th most populous  country in the world . It has an area of 48,670 sq km. It is a sovereign state located in the island of Hispaniola, in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean region. Santo Domingo is its capital and largest city.   Spanish is the official language of the Dominican Republic. The natives or inhabitants of this country are called Dominican. Peso (DOP) is its currency. It has only one bordering country and that is Haiti. With these facts about Dominican Republic, let us further explore the country.

Dominican Pesos in the black wallet

65 Interesting facts about Dominican Republic

1. Before the formation of the Dominican Republic and Haiti , the island was jointly named Hispaniola.

2.  The Dominican Republic is the only country in the world to have an image of the Holy Bible on its national flag.

The Dominican Republic Flag

3. It is also the second-largest island in the Caribbean. Wondering which one is the largest? It is Cuba .

4. The country shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, making Hispaniola the one island shared by two countries. The Dominican Republic occupies the eastern five-eighths of the island of Hispaniola while the western three-eighths of the island is occupied by the nation of Haiti.

5. Street signs and restaurant menus are written in Spanish , which is the country’s official language.

6. People of the country are very loyal to their families.

7. “Catedral de Santa Maria La Menor” in the Dominican Republic is believed to be the oldest cathedral in the Americas. It dates back to 1540. The cathedral can be visited in the capital city of the country – Santo Domingo. At the front side is Columbus bronze statue facing north as well as Taíno native Anacaona the first person from Hispaniola to understand Spanish.

Catedral de Santa Maria la Menor.

8. The island country saw difficult days of brutality, conspiracy, and downfall during colonial times. It was affected by a poor economy and political instability even after gaining independence. However, as of today, the country is improving with the help of agriculture and tourism.

9. February 27, 1844, is the official independence day of the D.R.

10. Sugar processing is one of the main industries in the country. Established around a sugar mill, the settlement (batey) is a company town made of houses and barracks. It is very close to the fields of sugarcane, allowing convenience for the group of workers living around the labor sites.

11. People of the island nation prefer living in joint families. Isn’t this an interesting fact about the Dominican Republic considering that majority of the people like to live in nuclear families?

12.  The Dominican Republic is a popular destination for weddings and honeymoons.

The Dominican Republic on the map

13. The country is also known the world over for its golf courses that are set along the breathtaking coast.

14. The people of the region are not punctual. Say, if you had a meeting with someone at 8 pm, you could expect them to arrive by 8:45 or 9 pm. Arriving late is a norm in D.R., so do not fret when you have to wait for someone to arrive.

15. D.R. is also known for producing excellent rum . The country’s rum is manufactured using a unique distillation and aging process that brings pleasant taste and smoothness. They are known as the 3 Bs, for Brugal, Barcelo, and Bermudez. The other two respected and high-quality rums are the Vizcaya and Siboney. Tourists who visit the Dominican Republic get a rum tasting opportunity and it is much cheaper at the sources.

16. The northern west part of the island, the Bay of Samana, sees humpback whales that visit the island every year between December and March for mating. There is a sanctuary for whales where the creatures are treated with respect. Tourists can spot both full-grown humpbacks and their newborn calves. Most male humpbacks will be fighting for attention from the females, making it a fun activity to watch. They slap their tails and fins in the air thereby creating thunderous claps.

17. Voting is not permitted to the members of the armed forces and the national police.

18. Do not be surprised if you are handed a few chiclets in return when you pay the bill and there is some change to be given to you. Businesses generally hand over something of equal value to your change when the situation demands.

19. Drinking during the day, at night and on Sundays is completely normal. So, you can very much enjoy your drink at any time during your visit to the country.

20. This Dominican Republic fact is a little weird but funny! Honking your horn as loud as possible, in traffic jams, is considered very normal. Though honking won’t clear the traffic, it will still keep you busy during the trying times.

Dominican Republic Map

21. Coffee, sugar, and tobacco are the island’s main sources of income . Tourism is also playing an important part in supporting the economy now.

22. Moreover, the capital of the country–Santo Domingo–is the oldest city in the new world. The capital that was founded in 1496 by Bartholomew Columbus carries a rich history. The first colonial rule by Spanish Crown began here and it is no wonder the first cathedral, university, and municipal building were established here.

23. The country experiences warm and sunny conditions for most parts of the year. For this reason, the climate of D.R. is also known as an  “endless summer.”

coffee Dominican Republic

24. Coffee is their national drink, and baseball is their national sport.

25. “Dominican flag ” is the name of their traditional dish . It is prepared using chicken, beans, and rice.

26. They have a beer named “ Presidente. ”

27. “Merengue” is the name given to the Dominican Republic’s music . It (Merengue) is a Spanish word for whipped egg whites in sugar.

28. The Dominican Republic is the site of the first permanent European settlement in the Americas.

dominican republic tourism facts

29. Christopher Columbus visited the island on December 5, 1492. Actually, he founded the island (accidentally), naming it Hispaniola.

Caribbean Sunset, Bavaro.

30. A large group of people from the Dominican Republic live in the U.S., sending billions of dollars in remittance to their families.

31. D.R. also served as headquarters for the pirates of the Caribbean during the mid 17 th century. Pirates recruited people here for raiding Spanish treasure ships.

32. It is also the most visited destination in the Caribbean.

33. Before independence, the country was known as Santo Domingo.

34.  The Colonial City of Santo Domingo is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

35. The western third of the island was separated, and a new country—Haiti—was born in 1804. The remaining island at that time was known as Santo Domingo. Haiti ruled over Santo Domingo until 1844 when the region became independent and was named the Dominican Republic.

36. In the area, the island nation is slightly more than twice the size of New Hampshire . It shares a land boundary of 376 km with Haiti.

37. Pico Duarte, at 3,098 m, is the highest point in the country. Sir Robert H. Schomburgk was the first climber to the mountain , 1851.

38. More than 50% of the land of the island is used for  agriculture, while 40% is covered by forests.

39. Severe storms are experienced in the country between June and October.

40.  The Dominican Republic is the oldest European settlement in the Western Hemisphere.

41.  The Dominican Republic is the only country in the world to produce a rare blue variety of the silicate mineral pectolite. Its color changes from white, light-blue, green-blue to deep blue.

Lariman specimen

42. Police in the country are very polite and helpful to locals as well as tourists. Do not be afraid to ask for help, when in need.

Did you know?

43. People of the country are very thankful and religious. You will often read the statement,  “God has blessed this business.”  This signifies their belief in religion.

44. Abortions are banned in the country, even in cases of rape and serious health problems of pregnant women.

45. An estimated 7.5 million people visit the country annually. It ranks among the top ten most popular tourist destinations in the Americas. The country’s administration is expecting to reach 10 million annual visitors by 2023. Majority of the tourists come from the United States and Canada .

46. The Amber Museum in Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic has an amber stone with a  prehistoric mosquito preserved inside of it.

47. The Dominican Republic is known as the “Breadbasket of the Caribbean.”

48. D.R. has the second-largest number of Major League Baseball players. It stands second only to the United States . They have produced many world-famous baseball players .

49.  Juan Marichal is the only Dominican player who is a part of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

50.  On the 500 th anniversary of the  discovery of the island by Christopher Columbus, a lighthouse—Faro a Colon—was erected in Santo Domingo.

dominican republic tourism facts

51.  The majority of women in the Dominican Republic have curly hair. However, the women in the region like straight hair. Hence, they visit salons to get the job done.

52.  The Dominican Republic is also home to a threatened species of lizard in the family of Iguanidae – the rhinoceros iguana. The lizard varies in length from 60 to 136 centimetres while their skin color could be steely grey, dark green or brown.

A male rhinoceros iguana

53. Lake Enriquillo is the largest lake and the lowest elevation in the Caribbean. The lake is found in the southwestern part of the country, about 30 minute-drive from the town of La Descubierta. It covers an area of 375 square km. It is the home of at least 400 species of the American crocodile.

54. Legally, the drinking age in the country is 18. And it is illegal in the country to kiss a woman in front of a police officer.

55. Did you know that Haiti, now the neighboring country of the Dominican Republic, also ruled over the country for nearly 20 years?

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38 facts about dominican republic.

Delly Ables

Written by Delly Ables

Modified & Updated: 02 Mar 2024

Sherman Smith

Reviewed by Sherman Smith

  • Dominican Republic Facts
  • Tropical Paradise Facts

38-facts-about-dominican-republic

The Dominican Republic is a captivating country located in the Caribbean region. Known for its stunning beaches, rich culture, and warm hospitality, this tropical paradise offers a myriad of attractions for visitors from around the world. From the vibrant capital city of Santo Domingo with its colonial architecture to the breathtaking natural beauty of the Punta Cana coast, the Dominican Republic has something to offer every traveler.

In this article, we will delve into 38 fascinating facts about the Dominican Republic, shedding light on its history, culture, cuisine, and natural wonders. Whether you’re planning a visit or simply interested in learning more about this incredible destination, these facts will provide you with a deeper understanding and appreciation for the Dominican Republic.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Dominican Republic is a vibrant country with rich history, diverse culture, and stunning natural beauty. From its beautiful beaches to its lively music and dance scene, there’s something for everyone to enjoy.
  • With its warm and welcoming culture, the Dominican Republic is a popular tourist destination known for its picturesque landscapes, vibrant festivals, and delicious cuisine. It’s a Caribbean gem waiting to be explored!

Santo Domingo is the capital and largest city of the Dominican Republic.

Santo Domingo, known for its historic charm and vibrant culture, is the economic, political, and cultural center of the country.

The Dominican Republic is located in the Caribbean region of North America.

With its beautiful beaches and tropical climate, the country is a popular tourist destination.

The official language of the Dominican Republic is Spanish.

Spanish is widely spoken throughout the country, although English is also spoken in tourist areas.

The Dominican Republic shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti.

Hispaniola is the second-largest island in the Caribbean and is located in the Greater Antilles.

The country is known for its diverse geography.

It features stunning mountain ranges, lush valleys, pristine beaches, and breathtaking waterfalls.

The Dominican Republic is the second-largest Caribbean country by area and population.

Its land area covers approximately 48,442 square kilometers, and it has a population of over 10 million people.

Baseball is the most popular sport in the Dominican Republic.

The country has produced many top baseball players who have gone on to play in Major League Baseball.

The Dominican Republic is famous for its music and dance.

Merengue and bachata are the most popular music genres, and dancing is an integral part of the culture.

Punta Cana is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Dominican Republic.

Known for its luxurious resorts and pristine beaches, Punta Cana attracts millions of tourists each year.

The Dominican Republic has a rich colonial history.

It was the first European settlement in the Americas and has numerous well-preserved colonial buildings and fortresses.

The country is home to the oldest cathedral in the Americas.

The Cathedral of Santa María la Menor, located in Santo Domingo , was built in the early 16th century.

The Dominican Republic is a democratic republic.

It has a multi-party political system and holds regular elections to determine its leaders.

The official currency of the Dominican Republic is the Dominican peso (DOP).

Visitors can exchange their currency at banks, exchange bureaus, or hotels throughout the country.

The country has a tropical climate characterized by warm temperatures year-round.

It experiences two seasons: a dry season from November to April and a rainy season from May to October.

The Dominican Republic is known for its delicious cuisine.

Traditional dishes include sancocho (a hearty stew), mofongo (mashed plantains), and tostones (fried plantains).

The Dominican Republic is the largest producer of organic cocoa in the world.

Its cocoa beans are renowned for their quality and are used to make some of the finest chocolates.

The country is home to the Caribbean’s highest peak, Pico Duarte.

Pico Duarte stands at 3,098 meters above sea level and offers stunning views of the surrounding landscape.

The Dominican Republic has a rich biodiversity.

It is home to various species of birds, reptiles, mammals, and plants, including the national flower, the Bayahíbe rose.

The Dominican Republic has a vibrant carnival culture.

Carnival celebrations feature colorful costumes, lively music, and energetic parades that take place throughout the country.

The country has a well-developed tourism industry.

It offers a wide range of accommodations, from all-inclusive resorts to boutique hotels and eco-lodges.

The Dominican Republic has several UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

This includes the Colonial City of Santo Domingo, the National Park of the East, and the Dominican Monuments.

The country is known for its high-quality cigars.

Cigar production is a significant industry, with many renowned tobacco fields and factories located throughout the country.

The Dominican Republic is a popular destination for eco-tourism.

Visitors can explore national parks, mangrove forests, and protected areas, showcasing the country’s natural beauty.

The Dominican Republic has a well-developed transportation system.

It has international airports, an extensive road network, and a reliable public transportation system.

The country has a rich artistic heritage.

It is renowned for its talented painters, sculptors, musicians, and writers who have made significant contributions to the arts.

The Dominican Republic has a robust coffee industry.

Its coffee beans are highly sought after for their rich flavor and aroma.

The Dominican Republic has a diverse population.

Its population is a mix of indigenous Taino people, African descendants, and European settlers.

The country has multiple national parks and protected areas.

These areas help preserve the country’s natural beauty and support various plant and animal species.

The Dominican Republic has a low crime rate compared to other countries in the region.

However, it is always important for visitors to exercise caution and follow safety guidelines.

The country has a strong passion for baseball.

Baseball games are a popular social activity, and many Dominicans actively participate in the sport.

The Dominican Republic has a vibrant nightlife.

It offers a variety of clubs, bars, and restaurants where visitors can enjoy music, dancing, and local cuisine.

The country is known for its stunning beaches.

From the beautiful beaches of Punta Cana to the surfing spots in Cabarete, there are endless options for beach lovers.

The Dominican Republic has a strong commitment to conservation.

Efforts are being made to protect its natural resources, including reforestation projects and sustainable tourism practices.

The country has a fascinating history of pirate activity.

The Caribbean Sea was a popular spot for pirates during the colonial era, and their presence has left a mark on the country’s history.

The Dominican Republic is a popular destination for destination weddings.

Its picturesque landscapes and luxurious resorts make it an ideal choice for couples looking to tie the knot.

The country has a well-established healthcare system.

There are modern hospitals and medical facilities available to cater to both locals and tourists.

The Dominican Republic is known for its vibrant festivals.

Celebrations such as Semana Santa (Holy Week) and the Dominican Carnival attract tourists from around the world.

The Dominican Republic has a warm and welcoming culture.

The locals, known as Dominicans, are known for their friendly nature and hospitality towards visitors.

These 38 facts about the Dominican Republic showcase the country’s rich history, diverse culture, and natural beauty. Whether you’re interested in exploring its historic sites, enjoying its beautiful beaches, or immersing yourself in its vibrant music and dance scene, the Dominican Republic offers something for everyone.

Plan your visit to this Caribbean gem and experience all that the Dominican Republic has to offer!

In conclusion, the Dominican Republic is a fascinating country with a rich history, vibrant culture, and breathtaking natural beauty. From its stunning beaches and tropical landscapes to its vibrant cities and warm hospitality, there is no shortage of things to see and do in this Caribbean paradise.

With its diverse environment, the Dominican Republic offers a wide range of activities for every type of traveler. Whether you’re seeking adventure in the lush jungles, exploring ancient ruins, or simply relaxing on the beach, this country has something to offer everyone.

As you embark on your journey to the Dominican Republic, take the time to immerse yourself in the local customs and traditions, sample the delicious cuisine, and connect with the friendly locals. By doing so, you’ll gain a deeper appreciation for this extraordinary destination.

1. What is the official language of the Dominican Republic?

The official language of the Dominican Republic is Spanish. However, English is also commonly spoken in tourist areas.

2. Do I need a visa to visit the Dominican Republic?

Visitors from many countries, including the United States, do not require a visa to enter the Dominican Republic for tourism purposes. However, it is advisable to check the visa requirements based on your nationality prior to traveling.

3. What is the currency used in the Dominican Republic?

The official currency of the Dominican Republic is the Dominican Peso (DOP). It is recommended to have local currency on hand for most transactions, although major credit cards are widely accepted in tourist areas.

4. Is the Dominican Republic a safe country to visit?

Like any other travel destination, it is important to exercise caution and use common sense while visiting the Dominican Republic. While most visits are trouble-free, it is advisable to take necessary precautions to ensure a safe and enjoyable trip, such as avoiding isolated areas at night and safeguarding personal belongings.

5. What are some popular tourist attractions in the Dominican Republic?

The Dominican Republic offers a plethora of tourist attractions, including beautiful beaches in Punta Cana, the historic city of Santo Domingo, the stunning landscapes of Jarabacoa, and the wildlife-rich Samaná Peninsula. Other popular activities include visiting the natural wonders of Los Haitises National Park and exploring the ancient Taino caves.

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Dominican Republic

Travel Advisory June 6, 2023

Dominican republic - level 2: exercise increased caution.

Reissued with updates to health information.

Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.

Country Summary:  Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault is a concern throughout the Dominican Republic. The development of a professional tourist police corps, institution of a 911 system in many parts of the country, and a concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas like Santo Domingo. The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality on the broader scale.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Dominican Republic.

If you decide to travel to the Dominican Republic:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Follow the advice of resort and tour operators regarding local safety and security concerns.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter .
  • Review the Country Security Report for the Dominican Republic.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

Embassy Messages

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Quick Facts

Passports must be valid for the period of stay in the Dominican Republic.

1 page required for entry stamp

Not required for visits shorter than 30 days

None required if arriving from the United States

$10,000 and over or its equivalent must be declared

Embassies and Consulates

U.s. embassy santo domingo.

Av. República de Colombia #57 Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Telephone: +(809) 567-7775 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(809) 567-7775, dial zero (0) ask for Duty Officer Email:   [email protected] Hours: Monday through Friday from 7:00 AM to 4:00 PM except U.S. and Dominican holidays 

Consular Agencies

U.S. Consular Agent - Puerto Plata Plaza el Doral, carretera Luperón KM 3 1/2 Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic Telephone:  +(809) 586-4204, +(809) 586-8023 Emergency After-Hours Telephone:  (809) 567-7775, dial zero (0) ask for Duty Officer Email:  [email protected] Hours:  Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM except U.S. and Dominican holidays

U.S. Consular Agent - Bavaro/Punta Cana Palma Real Shopping Center Business Center 2nd Floor Bavaro, La Altagracia, Dominican Republic Telephone:  (809) 552-8990 Emergency After-Hours Telephone:  +(809) 567-7775, dial zero (0) ask for Duty Officer Email:  [email protected] Hours:  Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM except U.S. and Dominican holidays

Destination Description

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Visas are not required for visits shorter than 30 days. Visit the  Embassy of the Dominican Republic  website for current visa information.

All visitors to the Dominican Republic are charged a $10 tourist card fee that is incorporated into airline charges. Cruise passengers must obtain a tourist card if they are disembarking for longer than 24 hours. Once used, the card allows for stays up to 30 days but can be extended at the General Directorate of Migration in Santo Domingo.

Contact the  Migration Department  in Santo Domingo for visa extension requests. Failure to request an extension will result in a fine at the airport upon departure. The fines range from approximately $55 USD for one month to as high as $1,555 USD for overstays of 10 years or more.

All passengers are required to fill out an  E-Ticket  or paper form when entering or exiting the Dominican Republic. If using E-Ticket, a new form is required for each entry and exit and the code generated upon form completion can be presented at the airport on a digital device.

Visitors must have a ticket entering and leaving the country, the financial means to pay for their stay, and an address in the Dominican Republic where they will be staying.

Exit Requirements for Children:  Minors (children under 18) who are citizens (including dual citizens) or legal residents of the Dominican Republic, if not accompanied by both parents or legal guardian(s), are required to present official proof of parental consent to travel. Please see the Dominican  Migration Department's  website for detailed instructions on the required documents.

HIV/AIDS Restrictions:  Some HIV/AIDS entry restrictions exist for visitors to and foreign residents of the Dominican Republic. The Dominican Republic has restrictions on granting residency to people with HIV/AIDS. Please verify information with the Dominican Republic’s  Migration Department  before you travel.

Yellow Fever Vaccine:  Proof of vaccination against yellow fever is required for travelers entering the Dominican Republic from Brazil. Similar requirements may apply to those traveling from other  countries with yellow fever risk .

Find information on  dual nationality ,  prevention of international child abduction ,  and  customs regulations  on our websites.

Safety and Security

Crime:  Crime is a threat throughout the Dominican Republic. Tourist destinations are generally more policed than metropolitan areas.

  • If robbed, hand over your personal belongings without resisting.
  • Do not carry or wear valuable items that will attract attention.
  • Be wary of strangers.
  • Travel with a partner or group if possible.

International Financial Scams:  See the  Department of State  and the  FBI   pages for information.

Dating App Robberies:  Several U.S. citizen travelers in the Dominican Republic have reported that they were robbed by people they met through popular online dating applications. If meeting with strangers, you should strongly consider meeting only in public places and avoiding isolated locations where crimes are most likely to occur.

Demonstrations:  Avoid areas of demonstrations and exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.

Victims of Crime:  Report crimes to the local tourist police (POLITUR) at 809-222-2026 or  911  and contact the U.S. Embassy at 809-567-7775. 911 is operational throughout the country apart from some areas located near the Haitian border. Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crime.

See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .

  • Help you find appropriate medical care.
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police.
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent.
  • Provide general information regarding the victim’s role during the local investigation and following its conclusion.
  • Provide a list of local attorneys.
  • Provide our information on  victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution.
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact POLITUR (809-222-2026), the  National Police ( 809-682-2151), and the U.S. Embassy for assistance.

Sexual Assault:  Rape and sexual assault has been reported throughout the Dominican Republic, including at major resorts and hotels.

Notes for your safety:

  • U.S. citizens have been targeted with date rape drugs.
  • Sexual assault victims in the Dominican Republic should not expect the totality of assistance offered in the United States. Rape kits are often not available until the following morning and must be administered by Dominican authorities.
  • Victims often have to request medication to avoid transmission of STDs and reduce the chances of pregnancy.
  • Prosecution of a rape case moves forward very slowly. Dominican law may require the victim to return to the Dominican Republic at some stages of the judicial process.
  • Security outside of the resort area, including beach areas, is unpredictable, especially at night.

Best Practices:

  • Contact the police/hotel management if resort staff demonstrate unwanted attention.
  • Victims of sexual/other assault should contact the police and the Embassy. Insist that hotel management take immediate action by contacting the police.
  • In a resort, avoid secluded places. Always be accompanied by someone you know, even going to the restroom.
  • Do not consume alcoholic beverages alone or with new acquaintances. Do not leave drinks unattended.  Know your limits and help your friends/travelling companions to remain safe.
  • Shout for help immediately if threatened or made uncomfortable.
  • Report suspicious activity, including excessive friendliness by hotel employees, to hotel management, the U.S. Embassy, and local police.
  • Do not swim alone due to life-threatening undertows.

Tourism:  The tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities may not commonly occur in all parts of the country. Hazardous areas and activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the host government or by recognized authorities in the field. In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in or near major cities or major tourist zones. First responders may be unable to access areas outside of major cities or major tourist zones. The ability to provide urgent medical treatment may be limited. U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance. See our webpage for more  information on insurance providers for overseas coverage . 

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Individuals establishing a business or practicing a profession that requires additional permits or licensing should seek information from the competent local authorities, prior to practicing or operating a business. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website. Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking illegal drugs in the Dominican Republic are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage and  general information on legal assistance  for further information.

Counterfeit and Pirated Goods: Although counterfeit and pirated goods are prevalent in many countries, their possession they may still be illegal according to local laws. You may also pay fines or have to give them up if you bring them back to the United States. See the U.S. Department of Justice website for more information.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See the following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Report – see country reports
  • Human Rights Report – see country reports
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in the Dominican Republic.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers with Disabilities:  The law in the Dominican Republic prohibits discrimination against persons with physical, sensory, intellectual or mental disabilities, but the law is not enforced consistently. Social acceptance of persons with disabilities in public is not as prevalent as in the United States. Accessible facilities, information, communication/access to services and ease of movement is limited in most parts of the country. Large resorts and Santo Domingo may have some generally accessible infrastructure, but travelers should not expect the level available in the United States.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

Disaster Preparedness:  Register with the Embassy on or before your arrival through our  travel registration website . In the event of a natural disaster or emergency, this will keep you informed. Additional information on  natural disasters and disaster preparedness  can be found on our website. Real Estate:  Property rights are irregularly enforced, and investors often encounter problems in receiving clear title to land. Consult a reputable attorney before signing documents or closing on any real estate transactions. Real estate investments by U.S. citizens have been subject to legal and physical takeover attempts. Absentee landlords and absentee owners of undeveloped land are particularly vulnerable. Consider purchasing title insurance. Scams:  Scammers often target elderly people by pretending to be a law enforcement official, an attorney, or a U.S. Embassy official, claiming that a loved one has been arrested overseas. The caller instructs the victim to wire money. Scammers sometimes impersonate family members, such as a scared grandchild. Contact the U.S. Embassy before wiring money to the Dominican Republic. When in doubt, try to contact your loved one directly.

For emergency services in the Dominican Republic, dial 911 or 809-202-2026 .

Ambulance services:

  • The training and availability of emergency responders may be below U.S. standards.
  • Ambulances are not present or reliable in most areas of the country. They are more reliable and available in Santo Domingo, Santiago, Punta Cana, and Puerto Plata.

We do not pay medical bills.  Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas.  Most hospitals and doctors overseas do not accept U.S. health insurance.

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See  our webpage  for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. Visit the  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. Check with the  Ministry for Public Health  to ensure the medication is legal in the Dominican Republic.

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all  vaccinations  recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC)

Air Quality:  Visit  AirNow Department of State  for information on air quality at U.S. Embassies and Consulates.

The U.S. Embassy maintains a  list of doctors and hospitals . We do not endorse or recommend any specific medical provider or clinic.

Health facilities in general:

  • Public medical clinics lack basic resources and supplies.
  • Hospitals and doctors require payment “up front” prior to service or admission.
  • Private hospitals usually require advance payment or proof of adequate insurance before admitting a patient.
  • Be aware that some hotels, resorts, etc. have exclusive agreements with medical providers, which have costs associated and may limit your choices in seeking emergency medical attention.
  • Medical staff may speak little or no English.
  • Generally, in public hospitals only minimal staff is available overnight in non-emergency wards. Consider hiring a private nurse or having family spend the night with the patient, especially a minor child.
  • Patients bear all costs for transfer to or between hospitals.
  • Psychological and psychiatric services are limited, even in the larger cities, with hospital-based care only available through government institutions

Medical Tourism and Elective Surgery

U.S. citizens have suffered serious complications or died during or after having cosmetic or other elective surgery. 

If you are considering travel to the Dominican Republic for cosmetic surgery, be mindful of the following:

  • Have a medical evaluation from a U.S. doctor to determine if you are a good candidate for surgery.
  • Before travel, carefully research the doctor (e.g. qualifications, experience performing the surgery, complication rate) and credentials of the recovery facility you plan to use.
  • Share all health information (e.g. medical conditions, medications, allergies) with your doctor before your surgery.
  • Obtain international travel insurance that covers medical evacuation back to the United States and repatriation of remains. For more information, see:  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/insurance . 
  • See a travel medicine professional in the United States at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to discuss healthy travel and to learn about specific risks related to your surgery and travel. For more information on the risks of medical tourism, see:  https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/medical-tourism .
  • Your legal options in case of malpractice are very limited in the Dominican Republic. 

Tap Water:  Tap water is unsafe to drink. Bottled water and beverages are considered safe. Please note that many restaurants use tap water for ice.

Adventure Travel

  • Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about  Adventure Travel .

General Health

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Tuberculosis
  • Chikungunya

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information about  Resources for Travelers  regarding specific issues in the  Dominican Republic .

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Driving conditions vary across the country. Drive defensively and with extreme caution.

Consider hiring a professional driver instead of driving yourself. You can hire licensed drivers who are familiar with local roads through local car rental agencies. In case of accidents, normally only the driver will be taken into custody. In 2019 six people died per day due to traffic accidents in the Dominican Republic.

Frequent hazards include:

  • other drivers not using headlights and/or taillights after dark
  • animals in the road
  • missing manhole covers and large potholes
  • uneven road surfaces
  • scooters and motorcycles driving erratically and splitting lanes
  • driving on sidewalks or against traffic
  • intersections without stop signs
  • unregulated and congested traffic patterns
  • speeding or the running of stoplights
  • heavy urban traffic

Traffic Laws:  Traffic laws are not enforced consistently. After an accident causing serious injury or death, authorities will often take the driver into custody, even if the driver is insured and appears to have not been at fault. Detentions frequently last until a judicial decision has been reached or until a waiver has been signed by the injured party.

Seat belts, and helmets for motorcyclists, are required by law. Violators may be fined. There are no child car seat laws. Police stop drivers using cell phones without a hands-free device.

Public Transportation:  Public transportation includes a metro and public bus system as well as shared bus or van taxis known as “guaguas” (converted vans or microbuses, often without doors). Guaguas run regular routes within urban areas and between towns in the countryside. Public buses and guaguas operating in the capital do not meet U.S. safety standards. Avoid unregulated taxis, which also often lack basic safety features. Use a reputable taxi service, either one recommended by your hotel or a well-known, vetted company. Rideshare services such as Uber are available in many parts of the country. Private bus lines travel between large cities and to popular tourist destinations. 

See our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of the Dominican Republic’s Ministry of Tourism and INTRANT (Instituto Nacional de Transito y Transporte Terrestre) the national authority responsible for road safety.

Aviation Safety Oversight:  The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of the Dominican Republic’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the  FAA’s website.   FAA’s safety assessment page .

Maritime Travel:  The U.S. Coast Guard has concerns about the security practices in the ports of the Dominican Republic. Until those concerns can be addressed, the Coast Guard advises that Mariners and passengers on commercial vessels traveling through the ports of the Dominican Republic should exercise caution.

Mariners planning travel to the Dominican Republic should also check for  U.S. maritime advisories and alerts . Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website , and the  NGA broadcast warnings .

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in  Dominican Republic . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the  International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA )  report.

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Dominican Republic Facts

Interesting facts about the dominican republic for kids.

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Here are some interesting Dominican Republic Facts which were chosen and researched by kids especially for kids.

Dominican Republic for Kids

dominican republic flag

  • Population : 11.4 million people live in the Dominican Republic (2024) 
  • Name : República Dominicana (Dominican Republic)
  • Capital : Santo Domingo with 3.6 million inhabitants
  • Government :  Presidential republic
  • Motto: " Dios, Patria, Libertad " (God, Homeland, Freedom)
  • Language : Spanish
  • Literacy : More than 93% of the people can read and write.
  • Religion : mainly Christian s (about 70% of these mainly Catholics 48%)

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  • Currency : 1 peso dominicano = 100 centavos
  • National Symbols : Palmchat (national bird), red, white and blue (national colours)
  • National Anthem:  " Quisqueyanos Valientes "
  • National Day : 27 February (Independence Day)
  • History : The Taíno people lived on Hispaniola island long before the Spanish colonisers settled on the island. Christopher Columbus explored the island on his first voyage in 1492. Due to smallpox and other imported diseases many of the Taíno people died during the colonisation. The Spanish established sugar cane plantations and in the 17th century the French mainly settled in the western parts of the island, where they started tobacco plantations. The Dominican Republic was first known as "Santo Domingo". In 1844 independence from Haiti was declared. The first constitution was established after the Dominican Republic's Independence War ended. The republic only gained independence again in 1865. 

Dominican Republic Facts Geography

Where is the Dominican Republic?

The Dominican Republic is located on an island in the Caribbean Sea. The island is called Hispaniola.

Hispaniola is the second largest island in the Caribbean on the North American continent. The island houses two countries: the Dominican Republic in the east and Haiti in the west. The Dominican Republic is larger in land area than Haiti.

Map of the Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic's capital city is called Santo Domingo. This city is located centrally on the southern coastline.

The Dominican Republic is a mountainous country with fertile valleys that are used for agriculture. 

Dominican Republic landscape with mountains

The Dominican Republic is the second largest country in the Caribbean - after Cuba. The country is about the same size as Slovakia or twice the size of New Jersey/USA. 

A flight from London/ UK to Punta Cana/ Dominican Republic takes roughly 8.5 hours while from Miami/USA a flight takes only 2 hours. Punta Cana is home to the busiest airport of the country and the main tourist centre of the area.

Dominican Republic Facts | Climate

The Dominican Republic has a tropical rainforest climate. The weather along the coastline is hot and humid with few seasonal variation and the country's interior has more temperate temperatures.

Punta Cana beach in the Dominican Republic

Hispaniola island is inside the Atlantic Ocean's hurricane belt. The hurricane season usually lasts from June to October. The last major hurricane that directly hit the Dominican Republic was Hurricane Fiona in September 2022 after the massive hurricanes that hit the island in 2004 and in 1998.

Dominican Republic Facts Geo Superlatives

  • The name "Dominican Republic" comes from the name of the city Santo Domingo. The indigenous Taíno name of the country is Quisqueya .
  • The Dominican Republic is the second largest country in the Caribbean - after Cuba.
  • Among the largest towns in the Dominican Republic are Santo Domingo, Santiago de los Caballeros and San Christobal. Puerto Plata with Playa Dorada in the north west of the country and Punta Cana in the south east of the island are among the most popular tourist resorts.
  • The capital city Santo Domingo is located at the Rio Ozama (in English: Ozama River). The Colonial City district that is an UNESCO world heritage site is located on the western river bank.

Santo Domingo is the Dominican Republic's capital city. The Ozama River runs through the city.

  • The highest mountain peak in the Dominican Republic is  Pico Duarte . The mountain is 3,098 m/ 10,164 ft high. It is also the highest mountain in the Caribbean.
  • Lake Enriquillo is the largest lake in the country and in the Caribbean. This lake is situated at 45 m/ 148 ft below sea level and therefore also is known as the lake with the lowest elevation in the region.

dominican republic lake enriquillo

  • The longest river in the Dominican Republic is the Yaque del Norte with 296 km/ 184 miles.
  • The Salto El Limón  (El Limon Waterfalls) are among the highest and most scenic waterfall sites.

dominican republic waterfalls

Dominican Republic Facts Dominican Republic Landmarks

  • Alcazár de Colón : This Dominican landmark is located in Santo Domingo's Ciudad Colonial (which means Colonial City). This palace was once home to Diego Columbus, son of Christopher Columbus. Today it houses a museum. The Ciudad Colonial is the site of the first cathedral and fortress built in the Americas and has been awarded UNESCO World Heritage status.

Alcazar de Colon in the Dominican Republic - image by Saaton/shutterstock

  • The monumental Faro a Colón , also referred to as 'Columbus Lighthouse' was built in 1992 to commemorate the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' landing in the country. In this building which includes a mausoleum and a museum the bones of Columbus (which is disputed by Spain) and ancient objects are exhibited.

Faro a Colon - Columbus Lighthouse is one of the landmarks in the Dominican Republic - image by Nikolay Antonov/Shutterstock

Los Haitises National Park : In this national park, numerous high towering rocks mount out of the water. The rock formations are up to 30 m/ 98 ft high.  Los haitises means 'hilly land' in the local Taíno language. The bay with rocky islands, mangroves and caves is best explored by boat.

Los Haitises

  • Jaragua National Park is the largest protected area in the Caribbean. Here you find the stunning Bahia de las Aguillas (which means "Eagles Bay"). This remote beach is 8 km/ 5 miles long. 

dominican republic beach

Dominican Republic Facts Economy

In the Dominican Republic's fertile valleys, farmers grow a large variety of agricultural products. Among the main produce are sugarcane, tobacco and coffee. About 40% of the country is forested and 50% of the land is used for agriculture.

The Dominican Republic is one of the ten top producers and exporters of cocoa products. 

Cocoa pod with cocoa beans

Other important export products of the Dominican Republic are the natural resources nickel, bauxite, gold and silver, as well as agricultural products such as sugar and coffee.

The main trading partner of the Dominican Republic are the USA. China, Haiti and Canada are also important trading partners.

Dominican Republic Facts | People

The Taino-Arawak Indians were the indigenous inhabitants of Hispaniola. The island was colonised by the Spanish and French. The Dominicans speak Spanish which is also the official language while in neighbouring Haiti people speak mainly French.

About 27% of the Dominican population is under 14 years old.

Children in the Dominican Republic - image by D-Visions/shutterstock

Most of the Dominican people live in urban areas (83%) along the southern coastal plains and in the fertile Cibao valley.

Dominican Republic Facts Food

The Dominican cuisine is influenced by Spanish, French, Taíno and African cooking styles. Plantains, beans, coconuts, fruits and vegetables are widely grown and used in the Dominican dishes. 

Typical Dominican food and drinks include :

  • Tostones : Fried green plantains, that are enjoyed usually salted not sweet.

Tostones and Plantains are common food in the Dominican Republic - image by MediaApepu/shutterstock.com

  • La Bandera : national dish called "national flag", usually eaten at lunchtime, made with chicken, rice, beans and served with avocado.
  • Sancocho : also often called the national soup is a meat broth made with vegetables and pumpkin
  • Helado de Batata : ice cream made with coconut milk and sweet potatoes 
  • Biscocho Dominicano : the "Dominican cake" is a frosted sponge cake filled with pineapple jam

Dominican Republic Facts  Animals

The Dominican national bird is the palmchat, a long-tailed songbird that is only found on Hispaniola island. The palmchat birds build huge communal nests for up to 30 families.

dominican republic palm chat bird

The Dominican Republic is also home to many endangered species such as the West Indian manatee and the threatened rhinoceros iguanas.

Rhinoceros iguana in the Dominican Republic - image by SkrypnykovDmytro

Humpback whales come to the Bay of Samaná from January to March. The whales come to the bay to mate and give birth to their young.

dominican republic whales

Popular Pages

Useful resources for dominican republic facts.

  • Central Intelligence Agency. "Central America: Dominican Republic." WorldFactBook . 22 January 2024. Last accessed 26 January 2024
  • Marianne Florentino. "23 Iconic Dominican Foods to Try From Around the Island & Their Cultural Influences." Dominican Abroad . 18 January 2024.  Last accessed 26 January 2024
  • Dominican Republic Ministry of Tourism. "Dominican Republic has it all." GoDominicanRepublic . Last accessed 26 January 2024

Images on Dominican Republic Facts page: shutterstock.com and own images

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Information Updated as of Dicember 1st , 2023

Entry Requirements | E-Ticket | Current Measures | FAQs  

Contact:  [email protected]

Entry Requirements

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR FOREIGNERS ENTERING THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AS TOURISTS

Foreigners entering the Dominican Republic as tourists must comply with the following requirements:

  • Passport with a minimum validity of six (6) months.
  • Air, maritime or land ticket of entrance and return.
  • A permanent address in the Dominican Republic.
  • Proof of sufficient economic solvency to cover their expenses during their stay in the Dominican Republic.

EXCEPTIONAL MEASURES ON THE VALIDITY OF TOURIST PASSPORTS, VALID FROM JUNE 1, 2023 TO MAY 30, 2024.

EXCEPTIONAL MEASURES FOR THE NATIONALS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION, UNITED KINGDOM, CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, BRAZIL, CHILE, ARGENTINA, COLOMBIA AND ECUADOR.

The nationals of the countries that integrate the European Union, England, Canada, United States of America, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Colombia and Ecuador, who enter the Dominican Republic, exclusively for tourist purposes, are authorized to do so with their valid and in force passports, and that the same remain in force during their stay and departure from the Dominican territory. This exceptional measure was implemented by the Dominican authorities as of June 1, 2023 and remains in force until May 30, 2024.

EXCEPTIONAL MEASURES FOR DIPLOMATIC OFFICIALS, PERMANENT MISSIONS, INTERNATIONAL AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS, ETC.

The following foreigners are exempted from the above, under the condition of reciprocity:

  • Diplomatic officers and consular officials accredited in the Dominican Republic, as well as other members of Permanent or Special Diplomatic Missions of Consular Posts and their family members who, by virtue of the rules of International Law, are exempt from the obligations related to obtaining a migratory category of entry.
  • Representatives and delegates, as well as the other members, and their relatives, of Permanent Missions or Delegations before the Intergovernmental Organizations with headquarters in the Dominican Republic or in International Conferences held in the Dominican Republic.
  • Officials assigned to International and Intergovernmental Organizations with headquarters in the Dominican Republic and their family members, as well as holders of Dominican diplomatic and official visas.

EXCEPTIONAL MEASURES FOR NATIONALS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WHO DO NOT MEET THE REQUIREMENTS ESTABLISHED IN THE LAW AND ITS REGULATIONS.

Without detriment to the provisions of this Resolution and pursuant to the discretionary power that the Law grants to the Director General of Migration, he may authorize the entry into the country of foreigners of U.S. nationality who do not meet the requirements established in the law and its regulations, when there are exceptional reasons of a humanitarian nature, public interest or compliance with commitments made by the Dominican Republic. Each authorization constitutes a case in point and, consequently, does not constitute a binding reference or precedent.

EXCEPTIONAL MEASURES FOR CITIZENS OF CUBAN NATIONALITY LEGALLY RESIDING IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA COMING FROM THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Citizens of Cuban nationality legally residing in the United States of America, coming from the United States of America, are authorized to enter the Dominican Republic as tourists, even with an expired passport for no more than twenty-four (24) months, as long as they have their “Permanent Resident Card” (also known as “Green Card”), which guarantees their legal capacity to reside permanently in the United States of America. This exceptional measure will be implemented by the Dominican authorities for an indefinite period of time, starting June 1, 2023.

ACCEPTANCE OF BOARDING OF FOREIGN PASSENGERS TO DOMINICAN TERRITORY BY AIRLINES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ESTABLISHED PROVISIONS.

The General Directorate of Migration shall communicate the present Resolution to the airlines authorized to operate in the Dominican territory, so that they take into consideration the provisions previously established for the entry into the national territory of the referred foreigners, taking into account their respective nationalities, the purpose of their stay and the time of permanence in the national territory. Therefore, the airlines may accept the boarding of passengers of the nationalities previously established with destination to the Dominican territory in accordance with the above provisions.

Note : Any other provision established by the Resolution contrary to the provisions herein is hereby repealed.

MEASURES FOR DOMINICAN CITIZENS HOLDING A DOMINICAN PASSPORT ARRIVING FROM OTHER COUNTRIES

The aforementioned measures do not apply to Dominican citizens holding a Dominican passport entering the Dominican Republic from another country.

ROUND TRIP FLIGHT TICKET

As of April 28, 2023, during the process of registration and verification of travel documents prior to boarding, national and foreign air operators operating to and from the Dominican Republic must ensure that all foreign passengers have an air ticket to and from the Dominican Republic (roundtrip). Dominican national passengers, as well as foreigners residing in the Dominican Republic, are exempted from this requirement.

The national and foreign air operators are responsible for the strict compliance of such requirement. Failure to comply with the above will result in the denial of entry to the Dominican Republic of foreign passengers, as well as the corresponding sanctions to national and foreign air operators, established by the General Directorate of Migration of the Dominican Republic.

Click  HERE  for specific country entry restrictions.

Based on the ever-changing nature of the COVID-19 virus, we recommend connecting with your airline or travel agent directly to discuss any protocols that may apply to your country. As needed, we also recommend visiting the  International Air Transport Association (IATA)  for any updates to international markets and their required procedures. IATA cannot guarantee its accuracy and can accept no liability for any errors or omissions.

All foreign and Dominican passengers entering or departing the Dominican Republic on commercial flights must complete the free electronic entry and exit form at:

https://eticket.migracion.gob.do

It is no longer required to fill it out 72 hours prior to the trip . It can be filled out as soon as you have your flight information, even months in advance. However, it must be filled out before arriving at the airline counter at the airport, as it is required to present it to the airline. To avoid delays at the airport, it is advised to complete the form before the trip.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE E-TICKET

If your specific home city is not shown in the form, you can choose the nearest large city in your state or province. If you are staying at a vacation rental, please ask the host to provide the complete address, including province, municipality and sector.

If you are  traveling as a family , you must fill out the form with the data of all the family members who will be traveling, however, it is only necessary that a single user be created in the system and that this user fill in the data of all the members of the family that belong to that trip, up to 6 members additional to the one filling out the form (7 persons in total per form). It is not necessary for each traveler in the same family to fill out an individual form. If more than 7 people are traveling, you must fill out an additional form for the rest. Children do not fill out the Customs section, only adults. A single QR code will be generated for the family.

You can print or make a screenshot of the arrival and departure confirmation QR codes. If you need to make any changes to the E-TICKET, you can consult it with the application code that was issued when you started filling out the form and make changes.  

Passengers arriving on private flights, non-commercial vessels, ferries, cruise ships, etc., do not need to fill out the E-TICKET. The physical Customs Declaration and International Embarkation/Disembarkation forms will be accepted for the aforementioned passengers.

World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) recognition

On May 9, 2022, the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) recognized the Dominican Republic as the number one country in the world in tourism recovery. The Dominican tourism model stands out for achieving the most successful recovery in the industry, reaching record numbers in tourist arrivals.

The success of the recovery is attributed to the Dominican Government and the pillars of innovation, entrepreneurship, education, and new destinations, which are the basis for the cooperative effort between the public and private sectors, which jointly ensure the guarantees and health protocols to guarantee safe tourism.

Click  HERE  for more information.

On January 18, 2022, the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) recognized the Dominican Republic for its successful recovery in the tourism industry and its efficient management of sanitary protocols in the country’s different tourist destinations.

The UNWTO highlighted the management and sanitary protocols applied in the Dominican Republic to guarantee safe tourism, thus achieving the most successful recovery of the industry in the entire region, reaching record figures in tourist arrivals.

The success of the recovery is due to the joint effort of the public and private sectors, who continue to work hand in hand with the Association of Hotels and Tourism (ASONAHORES).

The Dominican Republic is the only destination in the region where 100% of the employees in the tourism sector are fully vaccinated with two doses, and which has the lowest incidence rate of contagion in the tourist poles, making the country a safe destination for travel.

Thanks to its recovery, the Dominican Republic has become a tourism reference in the region.

Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I get a COVID-19 (antigen or PCR) test to travel back to my country?

Many countries require a negative COVID-19 test before boarding your departing flight or entering your home country. Please confirm with the authorities of your destination country the specific type of viral test you need (PCR, antigen or antibodies) and the time it should be administered (48, 72 or 96 hours). It is important to note that these requirements depend on the authorities of other countries and can change at any time.

Below you will find a list of laboratories within the Dominican Republic that are authorized to test for COVID-19. Please confirm with each laboratory if they perform the type of test you need to travel back to your destination country, the estimated time for delivery of results and the cost. Please contact each laboratory directly. The following test prices and delivery times are subject to change.

CGE CLINICAL LABORATORY (CENTRO GASTRODIAGNÓSTICO SRL)

It has three branches strategically located in the following Santo Domingo neighborhoods:

  • Gazcue: Calle José Joaquín Pérez #208.
  • Naco: Avenida Tiradentes # 14, Plaza Alfonso Comercial, 1st Floor.
  • Los Prados: Calle Nicolás Ureña Mendoza #2.

COVID-19 PCR Tests: 

Available at all locations. Walk in at all locations (no appointment needed).

  • Cost : RD$ 3,500 (approx. USD$ 60.00)
  • Results:  15 to 24 hours.

COVID-19 PCR PRIORITY Tests: 

  • Cost : RD$ 4,300 (approx. USD$ 70.00)
  • Results:  6 to 8 hours.

COVID-19 Antigen Tests: 

  • Cost : RD$ 1,600 (approx. USD$ 27.00)
  • Results:  1 to 2 hours.

For more information:

  • Website:   www.cgelaboratorio.com /  www.cgegrupomedico.com
  • Contact Center:  809-221-4190 ext. 221/ 809-221-3000
  • WhatsApp:  829-213-4395

AMADITA CLINICAL LABORATORY

It has 47 branches strategically located nationwide for general clinical analysis.

TESTING SERVICES FOR TRAVELERS:

Antigen Tests:

This test is available at almost every branch in the country in Santo Domingo, La Romana, Bávaro, Punta Cana, Higuey, Jarabacoa, Santiago, San Pedro de Macorís an Azua, among others. This test does not require an appointment and it can be requested directly at the branch or through the following channels:

  • Amadita App  (available for Android & IOS)
  • Web page   www.amadita.com
  • WhatsApp:  +1(809) 682-5414

Cost: RD$1,700 (approx. USD$30)

Results: Between 2 and 4 hours

You must present your passport.

COVID-19 PCR tests:

The COVID-19 PCR test is performed nationwide by requesting a visit to your hotel of a specialist or in person at the special collection points located in Santo Domingo and Santiago. You can request the test by completing the form required by the Ministry of Health through the following channels:

Cost: RD$4,100 (approx. USD$72)

Results: Between 48 and 72 hours.

You must make an appointment and present your passport.

Respiratory SARS COV 2 (COVID-19) tests:

This test is performed nationwide by requesting a visit to your hotel of a specialist or in person at the special collection points located in Santo Domingo and Santiago. You can request the test  through the following channels:

Cost: RD$8,500

Results: Between 4 and 8 hours.

For more information contact +1(809) 682-5414 or  www.amadita.com .

AMADITA CLINI CAL LABORATORY AT  LAS AMÉRICAS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (SANTO DOMINGO)

Amadita Clinical Laboratory offers antigen and respiratory panel testing at Las Las Américas International Airports (Santo Domingo)  only for emergencies.

The lab in the airport is located on the third level and is open from Monday to Sunday, between 5:00AM and 8:00 PM.

Antigen Test cost: RD$1,700

Cost of Mini Respiratory Panel with SARS COV 2 Test : RD$8,500

More information:

  • App Amadita (available for Android & IOS)
  • WhatsApp : +1(809)682-5414
  • amadita.com

REFERENCIA CLINICAL LABORATORY

A network of 51 locations throughout the country.

Available without appointment, starting at 2:00PM, to travelers presenting a confirmed flight itinerary and a form of identification, at the Santo Domingo, Santiago, Punta Cana, Bávaro, Higuey, La Romana, Puerto Plata, San Francisco de Macorís, La Vega, Nagua, Azua, Baní and San Juan de la Maguana branches.

Cost: RD$1,750

Results: 3 hours.

PCR Tests: 

Available at all branches throughout the country  with home-testing at hotels or  drive-through service (Auto Service). Appointment is required.

Cost: RD$4,300

Results: 48 hours

Express PCR Test:

Available at the Santo Domingo, Punta Cana, Bávaro and La Romana branches.

Cost: RD$5,000

Results: 24 hours

For more information or to schedule an appointment:

  • Tel.  +1(809) 221-2684 ext. 50
  • WhastApp : +1(809)221-5545
  • [email protected]
  • https://www.labreferencia.com/

PATRIA RIVAS CLINICAL LABORATORY

With 10 branches throughout the country, the lab also offers the service of home testing.

Available in the San Cristóbal, Punta Cana and  El Seibo Branches.

To schedule an appointment:

WhatsApp:  +1(829)292-9612

Tel.  +1 (809) -685-0950, ext. 1002 and 1003

https://patriarivas.com.do/covid-19/

email:  [email protected]

PUNTO  MÉDICO

Branches in:

  • Santo Domingo
  • San Cristobal
  • Bávaro

Cost: USD$90

Results: Between 24 and 72 hours

An appointment is necessary. The lab also offers home testing at selected hotels.

https://www.puntomedico.com.do/prueba-covid-19

  • Tel:  +1(809)338-3338 and +1(809)562-0040

Whatsapp: +1(809)562-0040

Antigen Test:

No appointment is necessary. Available at the following branches, from 7:00AM to 5:00 PM:

  • Punta Cana International Airport
  • Bávaro City Center, Bávaro.
  • Punto Medico Plaza Coral, Santiago
  • Punto Medico La Fuente, Santiago
  • Punto Medico Zona Universitaria, Santo Domingo,
  • Punto Medico Diamond Plaza, Santo Domingo.
  • Punto Medico Occidental Mall, Santo Domingo.
  • Hospital Semma, Santiago

Cost: USD$45

Results: Between 30 and 40 minutes

More information:   https://www.puntomedico.com.do

PUNTO  MÉDICO AT PUNTA CANA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Punto Médico laboratory offers antigen testing at the Punta Cana International Airport, from Monday to Sunday, between 7:00AM and 5:00 PM. No appointment is necessary.

Antigen Test cost: USD$45

CENTRO MÉDICO PUNTA CANA

Cost: RD$4,500

Cost: RD$2,000

Results: If the test is administered at the branch, between 2 and 4 hours. If the test is administered at the hotel, between 24 and 48 hours.

Additionally, guests staying at the following hotels can have the PCR or antigen test administered at the medical center in the property: Majestic Resorts, Nickelodeon, Catalonia Bávaro, RIU Republic, RIU Complejo, Viva Dominicus Bayahibe, Hilton Bayahibe, and Catalonia Bayahibe.

To schedule an appointment:  scan this QR code 

For more information call:  + 1 (809) -552-1506

Call Center – 24 hours / day:  +1 (809) 473-7283

Email:  [email protected]

Website:   https://www.centromedicopuntacana.com

HOSPITEN BÁVARO, PUNTA CANA

Hospiten has a partnership with several hotels in Punta Cana. Bávaro, Capcana and Uvero Alto to administer testing on the property. Please confirm with your hotel if they are part of this agreement.

Cost: USD$125

For tests administered on hotel property please check availability with Guest Services. For tests administered at the lab, please make an appointment by calling:

Tel:  +1 (809) 686-1414 ext. 2560

Cost: USD$35

Results: 20 minutes

Email:   [email protected]

Tel:  +1 (809) 686 1414

https://hospiten.com/centros-y-hospitales/cid/6

IMG HOSPITAL, PUNTA CANA

To schedule an appointment: +1 (809) 285 6116

For more information visit:  https://img.hospital

BOURNIGAL MEDICAL CENTER, PUERTO PLATA

Additionally, guests staying at the following hotels can have the PCR or antigen test administered at the medical center in the property: Lifestyle Hotels Cofresi, Senator, and Casa Marina Sosua.

To schedule an appointment:  scan this QR code

For more information:  +1 (809) 586-2342

Cellular / WhatsApp  +1 (829) 679-3155 (Monday to Friday from 8 am-6pm)

Email:  [email protected]

For more information:   https://www.centromedicobournigal.com

BOURNIGAL MEDICAL CENTER AT  GREGORIO LUPER Ó N INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, PUERTO PLATA

Service available from 10:00Am to 5:00PM.

Results: Between 20 and 30 minutes

HOSPITEN SANTO DOMINGO

Results: Same day, approximately 3 to 4 hours

Tests are administered only in the mornings, starting at 8:00 AM, from Monday to Friday.

Tel:  +1 (809) 541 30 00 ext. 2840

Email:  [email protected]

For more information visit:   https://hospiten.com/centros-y-hospitales/cid/4

CENTRO DIAGNÓSTICO DE HELICOBÁCTER PYLORI Y LABORATORIO CLÍNICO ESPECIALIZADO, SANTO DOMINGO

Cost: RD$3,000

Results: Between 1 and 2 hours.

An appointment is not necessary but suggested. Walk-ins welcomed and served on a first-come basis.

Tel: +1 (809) 567-1996 or +1(809) 732-7044 (for information in English please ask to speak to Dr. Lyanne Santana)

Whatsapp: +1(809)857-1952

Email:  [email protected]

Address: Calle Frank Félix Miranda #11. Ensanche Naco. Santo Domingo

LABORATORIO CLÍNICO SIRENY. LAS TERRENAS. SAMANÁ

It is strategically located in the municipality of Las Terrenas, Samaná. It has clinical analysis services in general and also offers testing service for travelers.

Antígen test COVID-19: Available by appointment at home or at the hotel. It is essential to have a passport if it is for travel. Also available with self-service in the laboratory parking lot, on a first-come, first-served basis.

Cost: RD$3,500 (aprox. USD$62)

Results: 24 horas

COVID-19 PCR tests: Available with Self Service in the laboratory parking lot. It is essential to make an appointment.

Cost: RD$ 6,500 (aprox. USD$114)

Results: 24 to 48 hours

To schedule an appointment or for more information:

  • Tel.  +1(809) 240-5910
  • WhatsApp  +1(809) 847-3880
  • Cel.  +1(809) 756-7476

How can I reduce my chances of contracting COVID-19?

General measures to protect against respiratory diseases include:

  • Frequently clean your hands (wash them with soap and water or alcohol solutions), especially after direct contact with sick people or their environment.
  • Avoid contact with people with signs of a respiratory illness, such as coughing or sneezing.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with disposable tissues when you cough or sneeze, and then wash your hands.

These measures also help protect you against frequent illnesses like the flu.

What should I do if I suspect I have COVID-19?

If you suspect that you have symptoms of COVID-19, the United States Center for Disease Control advises you to take the following steps:

  • Stay in your home or hotel room and call the doctor before going for a medical visit.
  • Avoid contact with other people and animals.
  • Wear a mask.
  • Cover your mouth or nose with a disposable tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands regularly and for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid sharing personal items with others.
  • Clean all high-contact surfaces every day.
  • Monitor your symptoms.

What are the symptoms of the coronavirus?

The most common symptoms are fever, cough, and feeling short of breath. In some cases, there may also be digestive symptoms like diarrhea and abdominal pain. Symptoms can be aggravated in vulnerable individuals such as the elderly or people with compromised immune systems, among others.

Where can I get information about the coronavirus?

Information on COVID-19 can be found on the websites of different official organizations. Our recommendations are as follows:

  • World Health Organization:
  • https://www.who.int/en/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019
  • Pan American Health Organization:
  • https://www.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=15696:coronavirus-disease-covid-19&Itemid=4206&lang=es
  • Dominican Republic Ministry of Public Health:
  • https://www.msp.gob.do/web/
  • United States Center for Disease Control:
  • https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index-sp.html

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  1. 80 Interesting Dominican Republic Facts You Should Know

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  2. Interesting Facts About Dominican Republic

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  3. 20 Best Things to Do in the Dominican Republic

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  4. Dominican Republic Maps & Facts

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  5. Best Things To Do In Dominican Republic

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  6. 20 Best Things to Do in the Dominican Republic

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  1. Dominican Republic Tourism Official Website

    Dominican Republic Has It All. Surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the north and the Caribbean Sea on the south, our lush tropical island paradise boasts nearly 1,000 miles (1,609 km) of coastline, 250 miles (402 km) of the world's top beaches, magnificent resorts and hotels, and a variety of sports, recreation and entertainment options. Here ...

  2. Tourism in the Dominican Republic

    Cayo Levantado, Samana. Tourism in the Dominican Republic is an important sector of the country's economy.More than 10 million tourists visited the Dominican Republic in 2023, making it the most popular tourist destination in the Caribbean and putting it in the top 5 overall in the Americas. The industry accounts for 11.6% of the nation's GDP and is a particularly important source of revenue ...

  3. Dominican Republic travel

    Dominican Republic. Caribbean. The Dominican Republic is one of the Caribbean's most geographically diverse countries, with stunning mountain scenery, desert scrublands, evocative architecture and beaches galore. Best Time to Visit. Best Places to Visit.

  4. Travel and tourism in the Dominican Republic

    It is the second-largest Caribbean country and the second-most populated. Most notably, the Dominican Republic is one of the main drivers for tourism in the region, representing close to 24 ...

  5. 30 Exciting Facts About Dominican Republic

    2. The Dominican Republic Has a Rich Ecosystem. The country boasts a rich ecosystem due to its strategic location in the Caribbean. There are beaches and coastal shores, lovely rainforests (about 43% of the country), 18 national parks, 6 protected reserves, and 2 marine sanctuaries. 3.

  6. Dominican Republic

    The currency of the Dominican Republic is the Dominican peso denoted by the symbol " $ " or " RD$ " (ISO code: DOP ). Wikivoyage uses "RD$" for clarity. Coins in the Dominican Republic come in denominations of RD$1, RD$5, RD$10 and RD$25. Banknotes in the Dominican Republic come in denominations of RD$20, RD$50, RD$100, RD$200, RD$500, RD$1,000 ...

  7. The Official Travel Guide to Dominican Republic · Visit Dominican Republic

    Learn about the culture, customs, destinations and activities of the Dominican Republic, a Caribbean paradise with stunning beaches and islands. Find out how to plan your holiday, get the best deals and enjoy the local culture and cuisine.

  8. Your Trip to the Dominican Republic: The Complete Guide

    Fact checked by. Jillian Dara. The Dominican Republic is known for its beautiful beaches and a multitude of resorts, but it's also one of the most diverse destinations you can visit and one that remains culturally rich. You'll want to come here for the country's merengue, bachata and live music and dancing scene, its hospitable people, as ...

  9. Tourism in the Dominican Republic

    The Dominican Republic is a country located in the Caribbean region of North America. It shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti to the west, and is bordered to the south by the Caribbean Sea and to the north by the Atlantic Ocean.The country has a total land area of approximately 48,670 square kilometres, making it the second largest country in the Caribbean after Cuba.

  10. Dominican Republic Travel Guide

    National Geographic's latest travel stories about Dominican Republic. ... 5 Ways to Explore the Dominican Republic Off the Beaten Path. Read. Doing It Right in the Dominican Republic.

  11. 75+ Interesting Dominican Republic Facts

    Tourism Facts of the Dominican Republic Republic Dominicana is the most visited destination in the Caribbean. More than 6 million tourists visit the country annually, making it the most popular tourist destination in the Caribbean and putting it in the top 5 in the Americas. The industry accounts for 11.6% of the nation's GDP and is a ...

  12. 25 Interesting and Fun Facts About the Dominican Republic

    Dominicans are friendly and diverse. The population of the Dominican Republic is as diverse as its nature. Dominicans are descendants of African, European, and indigenous Taíno people. According to genetic studies, the average DNA has about 73% European, 17% African, and 10% Native American blood.

  13. 16 Top Attractions & Things to Do in the Dominican Republic

    16. Los Haitises National Park. The Dominican Republic - Climate Chart. 1. Plan a Vacation to the Resort Destination of Punta Cana. Bavaro Beach, Punta Cana. Where an endless stretch of beautiful white-sand beach meets the emerald waters of the Caribbean is Punta Cana, the Dominican Republic's premiere resort destination.

  14. The top 8 places to visit in the Dominican Republic

    The area also has a vibrant party scene that pulsates late into the night, thanks to the various resorts' casinos and clubs. 2. Santo Domingo is best for culture buffs. The gritty hustle and bustle of city life collide with vibrant Dominican culture in the island's capital ("El Capital"), Santo Domingo.

  15. Dominican Republic Travel Guide

    Get information on Dominican Republic Travel Guide - Expert Picks for your Vacation hotels, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, sightseeing, and activities. Read the Fodor's reviews, or post ...

  16. Dominican Republic: a tourism success story

    The Dominican Republic is leading the recovery of tourism in the Caribbean, driven by strong demand from US travelers. Almost 60% of Americans are fully vaccinated, and one of the effects is a stampede to go abroad and make up for lost time. By the end of May, the Dominican Republic saw a 10% increase in travelers booking to arrive in July than ...

  17. 65 Interesting Facts About Dominican Republic

    Tourism is also playing an important part in supporting the economy now. 22. ... Interesting facts about Dominican Republic: a male rhinoceros iguana, Pedernales Province, Dominican Republic, 2007. Image credit - Wikipedia.org. 53. Lake Enriquillo is the largest lake and the lowest elevation in the Caribbean. The lake is found in the ...

  18. Destinations

    Santo Domingo. The Dominican Republic's capital city, Santo Domingo is also the most modern and dynamic metropolis in the Caribbean. Learn More. Samaná. Jutting out of the DR's northeastern shore and basking in the ocean, the nature haven that is the Samaná Peninsula is as coveted today as it was in the 16th century….

  19. 38 Facts about Dominican Republic

    38 Facts About Dominican Republic. The Dominican Republic is a captivating country located in the Caribbean region. Known for its stunning beaches, rich culture, and warm hospitality, this tropical paradise offers a myriad of attractions for visitors from around the world. From the vibrant capital city of Santo Domingo with its colonial ...

  20. Dominican Republic International Travel Information

    Reissued with updates to health information. Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.. Country Summary: Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault is a concern throughout the Dominican Republic.The development of a professional tourist police corps, institution of a 911 system in many parts of the country, and a concentration of resources in ...

  21. Dominican Republic

    The Dominican Republic has much in common with the countries of Latin America (with which it is often grouped), and some writers have referred to the country as a microcosm of that region. Dominicans have experienced political and civil disorder, ethnic tensions, export-oriented booms and busts, and long periods of military rule, including a Haitian occupation (1822-44), the oppressive ...

  22. Dominican Republic Tourism

    The period from December to April is the best time for a vacation in the Dominican Republic. The average air temperature during this period is +27 °С. The hottest period in the Dominican Republic is August-October, with the mean air temperature of +32 °С. The holiday season lasts all year round in the Dominican Republic.

  23. Dominican Republic Facts

    Population: 11.4 million people live in the Dominican Republic (2024) Name: República Dominicana (Dominican Republic) Capital : Santo Domingo with 3.6 million inhabitants. Government: Presidential republic. Motto: "Dios, Patria, Libertad" (God, Homeland, Freedom) Language: Spanish. Literacy: More than 93% of the people can read and write.

  24. The Dominican Republic's Best Beaches

    The Dominican Republic is well known for its stunning white-sand beaches that often seem to run into the horizon. Throw in some gently swaying coconut trees reaching for the skies, and you've got paradise at hand.Whether south, east, or north, this friendly country has plenty of different beaches to offer even the pickiest traveler.

  25. Coronavirus Information

    The Dominican Republic is the only destination in the region where 100% of the employees in the tourism sector are fully vaccinated with two doses, and which has the lowest incidence rate of contagion in the tourist poles, making the country a safe destination for travel.