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Travel and Tourism

Travel and tourism satellite account for 2017-2021.

The travel and tourism industry—as measured by the real output of goods and services sold directly to visitors—increased 64.4 percent in 2021 after decreasing 50.7 percent in 2020, according to the most recent statistics from BEA’s Travel and Tourism Satellite Account.

Chart: Annual Growth in Real Tourism in 2017-2021

Data & Articles

  • U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Account for 2017–2021 By Sarah Osborne - Survey of Current Business February 2023
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Account for 2015–2019" By Sarah Osborne - Survey of Current Business December 2020
  • "U.S. Travel and Tourism Satellite Account for 2015-2017" By Sarah Osborne and Seth Markowitz - Survey of Current Business June 2018
  • Tourism Satellite Accounts 1998-2019
  • Tourism Satellite Accounts Data Sheets A complete set of detailed annual statistics for 2017-2021 is coming soon -->
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Documentation

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Previously Published Estimates

  • Data Archive This page provides access to an archive of estimates previously published by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Please note that this archive is provided for research only. The estimates contained in this archive include revisions to prior estimates and may not reflect the most recent revision for a particular period.
  • News Release Archive

What is Travel and Tourism?

Measures how much tourists spend and the prices they pay for lodging, airfare, souvenirs, and other travel-related items. These statistics also provide a snapshot of employment in the travel and tourism industries.

What’s a Satellite Account?

tourism on government

  • TTSA Sarah Osborne (301) 278-9459
  • News Media Connie O'Connell (301) 278-9003 [email protected]

Reimagining the $9 trillion tourism economy—what will it take?

Tourism made up 10 percent of global GDP in 2019 and was worth almost $9 trillion, 1 See “Economic impact reports,” World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), wttc.org. making the sector nearly three times larger than agriculture. However, the tourism value chain of suppliers and intermediaries has always been fragmented, with limited coordination among the small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) that make up a large portion of the sector. Governments have generally played a limited role in the industry, with partial oversight and light-touch management.

COVID-19 has caused an unprecedented crisis for the tourism industry. International tourist arrivals are projected to plunge by 60 to 80 percent in 2020, and tourism spending is not likely to return to precrisis levels until 2024. This puts as many as 120 million jobs at risk. 2 “International tourist numbers could fall 60-80% in 2020, UNWTO reports,” World Tourism Organization, May 7, 2020, unwto.org.

Reopening tourism-related businesses and managing their recovery in a way that is safe, attractive for tourists, and economically viable will require coordination at a level not seen before. The public sector may be best placed to oversee this process in the context of the fragmented SME ecosystem, large state-owned enterprises controlling entry points, and the increasing impact of health-related agencies. As borders start reopening and interest in leisure rebounds in some regions , governments could take the opportunity to rethink their role within tourism, thereby potentially both assisting in the sector’s recovery and strengthening it in the long term.

In this article, we suggest four ways in which governments can reimagine their role in the tourism sector in the context of COVID-19.

1. Streamlining public–private interfaces through a tourism nerve center

Before COVID-19, most tourism ministries and authorities focused on destination marketing, industry promotions, and research. Many are now dealing with a raft of new regulations, stimulus programs, and protocols. They are also dealing with uncertainty around demand forecasting, and the decisions they make around which assets—such as airports—to reopen will have a major impact on the safety of tourists and sector employees.

Coordination between the public and private sectors in tourism was already complex prior to COVID-19. In the United Kingdom, for example, tourism falls within the remit of two departments—the Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS)—which interact with other government agencies and the private sector at several points. Complex coordination structures often make clarity and consistency difficult. These issues are exacerbated by the degree of coordination that will be required by the tourism sector in the aftermath of the crisis, both across government agencies (for example, between the ministries responsible for transport, tourism, and health), and between the government and private-sector players (such as for implementing protocols, syncing financial aid, and reopening assets).

Concentrating crucial leadership into a central nerve center  is a crisis management response many organizations have deployed in similar situations. Tourism nerve centers, which bring together public, private, and semi-private players into project teams to address five themes, could provide an active collaboration framework that is particularly suited to the diverse stakeholders within the tourism sector (Exhibit 1).

We analyzed stimulus packages across 24 economies, 3 Australia, Bahrain, Belgium, Canada, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Thailand, and the United Kingdom. which totaled nearly $100 billion in funds dedicated directly to the tourism sector, and close to $300 billion including cross-sector packages with a heavy tourism footprint. This stimulus was generally provided by multiple entities and government departments, and few countries had a single integrated view on beneficiaries and losers. We conducted surveys on how effective the public-sector response has been and found that two-thirds of tourism players were either unaware of the measures taken by government or felt they did not have sufficient impact. Given uncertainty about the timing and speed of the tourism recovery, obtaining quick feedback and redeploying funds will be critical to ensuring that stimulus packages have maximum impact.

2. Experimenting with new financing mechanisms

Most of the $100 billion stimulus that we analyzed was structured as grants, debt relief, and aid to SMEs and airlines. New Zealand has offered an NZ $15,000 (US $10,000) grant per SME to cover wages, for example, while Singapore has instituted an 8 percent cash grant on the gross monthly wages of local employees. Japan has waived the debt of small companies where income dropped more than 20 percent. In Germany, companies can use state-sponsored work-sharing schemes for up to six months, and the government provides an income replacement rate of 60 percent.

Our forecasts indicate that it will take four to seven years for tourism demand to return to 2019 levels, which means that overcapacity will be the new normal in the medium term. This prolonged period of low demand means that the way tourism is financed needs to change. The aforementioned types of policies are expensive and will be difficult for governments to sustain over multiple years. They also might not go far enough. A recent Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) survey of SMEs in the tourism sector suggested more than half would not survive the next few months, and the failure of businesses on anything like this scale would put the recovery far behind even the most conservative forecasts. 4 See Tourism policy responses to the coronavirus (COVID-19), OECD, June 2020, oecd.org. Governments and the private sector should be investigating new, innovative financing measures.

Revenue-pooling structures for hotels

One option would be the creation of revenue-pooling structures, which could help asset owners and operators, especially SMEs, to manage variable costs and losses moving forward. Hotels competing for the same segment in the same district, such as a beach strip, could have an incentive to pool revenues and losses while operating at reduced capacity. Instead of having all hotels operating at 20 to 40 percent occupancy, a subset of hotels could operate at a higher occupancy rate and share the revenue with the remainder. This would allow hotels to optimize variable costs and reduce the need for government stimulus. Non-operating hotels could channel stimulus funds into refurbishments or other investment, which would boost the destination’s attractiveness. Governments will need to be the intermediary between businesses through auditing or escrow accounts in this model.

Joint equity funds for small and medium-size enterprises

Government-backed equity funds could also be used to deploy private capital to help ensure that tourism-related SMEs survive the crisis (Exhibit 2). This principle underpins the European Commission’s temporary framework for recapitalization of state-aided enterprises, which provided an estimated €1.9 trillion in aid to the EU economy between March and May 2020. 5 See “State aid: Commission expands temporary framework to recapitalisation and subordinated debt measures to further support the economy in the context of the coronavirus outbreak,” European Commission, May 8, 2020, ec.europa.eu. Applying such a mechanism to SMEs would require creating an appropriate equity-holding structure, or securitizing equity stakes in multiple SMEs at once, reducing the overall risk profile for the investor. In addition, developing a standardized valuation methodology would avoid lengthy due diligence processes on each asset. Governments that do not have the resources to co-invest could limit their role to setting up those structures and opening them to potential private investors.

3. Ensuring transparent, consistent communication on protocols

The return of tourism demand requires that travelers and tourism-sector employees feel—and are—safe. Although international organizations such as the International Air Transport Association (IATA), and the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) have developed a set of guidelines to serve as a baseline, local regulators are layering additional measures on top. This leads to low levels of harmonization regarding regulations imposed by local governments.

Our surveys of traveler confidence in the United States  suggests anxiety remains high, and authorities and destination managers must work to ensure travelers know about, and feel reassured by, protocols put in place for their protection. Our latest survey of traveler sentiment in China  suggests a significant gap between how confident travelers would like to feel and how confident they actually feel; actual confidence in safety is much lower than the expected level asked a month before.

One reason for this low level of confidence is confusion over the safety measures that are currently in place. Communication is therefore key to bolstering demand. Experience in Europe indicates that prompt, transparent, consistent communications from public agencies have had a similar impact on traveler demand as CEO announcements have on stock prices. Clear, credible announcements regarding the removal of travel restrictions have already led to increased air-travel searches and bookings. In the week that governments announced the removal of travel bans to a number of European summer destinations, for example, outbound air travel web search volumes recently exceeded precrisis levels by more than 20 percent in some countries.

The case of Greece helps illustrate the importance of clear and consistent communication. Greece was one of the first EU countries to announce the date of, and conditions and protocols for, border reopening. Since that announcement, Greece’s disease incidence has remained steady and there have been no changes to the announced protocols. The result: our joint research with trivago shows that Greece is now among the top five summer destinations for German travelers for the first time. In July and August, Greece will reach inbound airline ticketing levels that are approximately 50 percent of that achieved in the same period last year. This exceeds the rate in most other European summer destinations, including Croatia (35 percent), Portugal (around 30 percent), and Spain (around 40 percent). 6 Based on IATA Air Travel Pulse by McKinsey. In contrast, some destinations that have had inconsistent communications around the time frame of reopening have shown net cancellations of flights for June and July. Even for the high seasons toward the end of the year, inbound air travel ticketing barely reaches 30 percent of 2019 volumes.

Digital solutions can be an effective tool to bridge communication and to create consistency on protocols between governments and the private sector. In China, the health QR code system, which reflects past travel history and contact with infected people, is being widely used during the reopening stage. Travelers have to show their green, government-issued QR code before entering airports, hotels, and attractions. The code is also required for preflight check-in and, at certain destination airports, after landing.

4. Enabling a digital and analytics transformation within the tourism sector

Data sources and forecasts have shifted, and proliferated, in the crisis. Last year’s demand prediction models are no longer relevant, leaving many destinations struggling to understand how demand will evolve, and therefore how to manage supply. Uncertainty over the speed and shape of the recovery means that segmentation and marketing budgets, historically reassessed every few years, now need to be updated every few months. The tourism sector needs to undergo an analytics transformation to enable the coordination of marketing budgets, sector promotions, and calendars of events, and to ensure that products are marketed to the right population segment at the right time.

Governments have an opportunity to reimagine their roles in providing data infrastructure and capabilities to the tourism sector, and to investigate new and innovative operating models. This was already underway in some destinations before COVID-19. Singapore, for example, made heavy investments in its data and analytics stack over the past decade through the Singapore Tourism Analytics Network (STAN), which provided tourism players with visitor arrival statistics, passenger profiling, spending data, revenue data, and extensive customer-experience surveys. During the COVID-19 pandemic, real-time data on leading travel indicators and “nowcasts” (forecasts for the coming weeks and months) could be invaluable to inform the decisions of both public-sector and private-sector entities.

This analytics transformation will also help to address the digital gap that was evident in tourism even before the crisis. Digital services are vital for travelers: in 2019, more than 40 percent of US travelers used mobile devices to book their trips. 7 Global Digital Traveler Research 2019, Travelport, marketing.cloud.travelport.com; “Mobile travel trends 2019 in the words of industry experts,” blog entry by David MacHale, December 11, 2018, blog.digital.travelport.com. In Europe and the United States, as many as 60 percent of travel bookings are digital, and online travel agents can have a market share as high as 50 percent, particularly for smaller independent hotels. 8 Sean O’Neill, “Coronavirus upheaval prompts independent hotels to look at management company startups,” Skift, May 11, 2020, skift.com. COVID-19 is likely to accelerate the shift to digital as travelers look for flexibility and booking lead times shorten: more than 90 percent of recent trips in China  were booked within seven days of the trip itself. Many tourism businesses have struggled to keep pace with changing consumer preferences around digital. In particular, many tourism SMEs have not been fully able to integrate new digital capabilities in the way that larger businesses have, with barriers including language issues, and low levels of digital fluency. The commission rates on existing platforms, which range from 10 percent for larger hotel brands to 25 percent for independent hotels, also make it difficult for SMEs to compete in the digital space.

Governments are well-positioned to overcome the digital gap within the sector and to level the playing field for SMEs. The Tourism Exchange Australia (TXA) platform, which was created by the Australian government, is an example of enabling at scale. It acts as a matchmaker, connecting suppliers with distributors and intermediaries to create packages attractive to a specific segment of tourists, then uses tourist engagement to provide further analytical insights to travel intermediaries (Exhibit 3). This mechanism allows online travel agents to diversify their offerings by providing more experiences away from the beaten track, which both adds to Australia’s destination attractiveness, and gives small suppliers better access to customers.

Government-supported platforms or data lakes could allow the rapid creation of packages that include SME product and service offerings.

Governments that seize the opportunity to reimagine tourism operations and oversight will be well positioned to steer their national tourism industries safely into—and set them up to thrive within—the next normal.

Download the article in Arabic  (513KB)

Margaux Constantin is an associate partner in McKinsey’s Dubai office, Steve Saxon is a partner in the Shanghai office, and Jackey Yu  is an associate partner in the Hong Kong office.

The authors wish to thank Hugo Espirito Santo, Urs Binggeli, Jonathan Steinbach, Yassir Zouaoui, Rebecca Stone, and Ninan Chacko for their contributions to this article.

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Sustainable tourism

Related sdgs, promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable ....

tourism on government

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Publications.

Tourism is one of the world's fastest growing industries and an important source of foreign exchange and employment, while being closely linked to the social, economic, and environmental well-being of many countries, especially developing countries. Maritime or ocean-related tourism, as well as coastal tourism, are for example vital sectors of the economy in small island developing States (SIDS) and coastal least developed countries (LDCs) (see also: The Potential of the Blue Economy report as well as the Community of Ocean Action on sustainable blue economy).

The World Tourism Organization defines sustainable tourism as “tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities".

Based on General assembly resolution 70/193, 2017 was declared as the  International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development.

In the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development SDG target 8.9, aims to “by 2030, devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products”. The importance of sustainable tourism is also highlighted in SDG target 12.b. which aims to “develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products”.

Tourism is also identified as one of the tools to “by 2030, increase the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries” as comprised in SDG target 14.7.

In the Rio+20 outcome document The Future We want, sustainable tourism is defined by paragraph 130 as a significant contributor “to the three dimensions of sustainable development” thanks to its close linkages to other sectors and its ability to create decent jobs and generate trade opportunities. Therefore, Member States recognize “the need to support sustainable tourism activities and relevant capacity-building that promote environmental awareness, conserve and protect the environment, respect wildlife, flora, biodiversity, ecosystems and cultural diversity, and improve the welfare and livelihoods of local communities by supporting their local economies and the human and natural environment as a whole. ” In paragraph 130, Member States also “call for enhanced support for sustainable tourism activities and relevant capacity-building in developing countries in order to contribute to the achievement of sustainable development”.

In paragraph 131, Member States “encourage the promotion of investment in sustainable tourism, including eco-tourism and cultural tourism, which may include creating small- and medium-sized enterprises and facilitating access to finance, including through microcredit initiatives for the poor, indigenous peoples and local communities in areas with high eco-tourism potential”. In this regard, Member States also “underline the importance of establishing, where necessary, appropriate guidelines and regulations in accordance with national priorities and legislation for promoting and supporting sustainable tourism”.

In 2002, the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg called for the promotion of sustainable tourism development, including non-consumptive and eco-tourism, in Chapter IV, paragraph 43 of the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation.

At the Johannesburg Summit, the launch of the “Sustainable Tourism – Eliminating Poverty (ST-EP) initiative was announced. The initiative was inaugurated by the World Tourism Organization, in collaboration with UNCTAD, in order to develop sustainable tourism as a force for poverty alleviation.

The UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) last reviewed the issue of sustainable tourism in 2001, when it was acting as the Preparatory Committee for the Johannesburg Summit.

The importance of sustainable tourism was also mentioned in Agenda 21.

For more information and documents on this topic,  please visit this link

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  Natural Resources Forum, a United Nations Sustainable Development Journal, seeks to address gaps in current knowledge and stimulate relevant policy discussions, leading to the implementation of the sustainable development agenda and the achievement of the Sustainable...

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Our Ocean, Our Future, Our Responsibility “The ocean is fundamental to life on our planet and to our future. The ocean is an important source of the planet’s biodiversity and plays a vital role in the climate system and water cycle. The ocean provides a range of ecosystem services, supplies us with

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The UN Ocean Conference 2022, co-hosted by the Governments of Kenya and Portugal, came at a critical time as the world was strengthening its efforts to mobilize, create and drive solutions to realize the 17 Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

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22nd general assembly of the united nations world tourism organization, world tourism day 2017 official celebration.

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Accessible Tourism for all is about the creation of environments that can cater for the needs of all of us, whether we are traveling or staying at home. May that be due to a disability, even temporary, families with small children, or the ageing population, at some point in our lives, sooner or late

4th Global Summit on City Tourism

The World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) and the Regional Council for Tourism of Marrakesh with support of the Government of Morroco are organizing the 4th Global Summit on City Tourism in Marrakesh, Morroco (9-10 December 2015). International experts in city tourism, representatives of city DMOs, of

2nd Euro-Asian Mountain Resorts Conference

The World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) and Ulsan Metropolitan City with support of the Government of the Republic of Korea are organizing the 2nd Euro-Asian Mountain Resorts Conference, in Ulsan, Republic of Korea (14 - 16 October 2015). Under the title “Paving the Way for a Bright Future for Mounta

21st General Assembly of the United Nations World Tourism Organization

Unwto regional conference enhancing brand africa - fostering tourism development.

Tourism is one of the Africa’s most promising sectors in terms of development, and represents a major opportunity to foster inclusive development, increase the region’s participation in the global economy and generate revenues for investment in other activities, including environmental preservation.

  • January 2017 International Year of Tourism In the context of the universal 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the International Year aims to support a change in policies, business practices and consumer behavior towards a more sustainable tourism sector that can contribute to the SDGs.
  • January 2015 Targets 8.9, 12 b,14.7 The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development commits Member States, through Sustainable Development Goal Target 8.9 to “devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products”. The importance of sustainable tourism, as a driver for jobs creation and the promotion of local culture and products, is also highlighted in Sustainable Development Goal target 12.b. Tourism is also identified as one of the tools to “increase [by 2030] the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries”, through Sustainable Development Goals Target 14.7.
  • January 2012 Future We Want (Para 130-131) Sustainable tourism is defined as a significant contributor “to the three dimensions of sustainable development” thanks to its close linkages to other sectors and its ability to create decent jobs and generate trade opportunities. Therefore, Member States recognize “the need to support sustainable tourism activities and relevant capacity-building that promote environmental awareness, conserve and protect the environment, respect wildlife, flora, biodiversity, ecosystems and cultural diversity, and improve the welfare and livelihoods of local communities” as well as to “encourage the promotion of investment in sustainable tourism, including eco-tourism and cultural tourism, which may include creating small and medium sized enterprises and facilitating access to finance, including through microcredit initiatives for the poor, indigenous peoples and local communities in areas with high eco-tourism potential”.
  • January 2009 Roadmap for Recovery UNWTO announced in March 2009 the elaboration of a Roadmap for Recovery to be finalized by UNWTO’s General Assembly, based on seven action points. The Roadmap includes a set of 15 recommendations based on three interlocking action areas: resilience, stimulus, green economy aimed at supporting the tourism sector and the global economy.
  • January 2008 Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria The Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria represent the minimum requirements any tourism business should observe in order to ensure preservation and respect of the natural and cultural resources and make sure at the same time that tourism potential as tool for poverty alleviation is enforced. The Criteria are 41 and distributed into four different categories: 1) sustainability management, 2) social and economic 3) cultural 4) environmental.
  • January 2003 1st Int. Conf. on Climate Change and Tourism The conference was organized in order to gather tourism authorities, organizations, businesses and scientists to discuss on the impact that climate change can have on the tourist sector. The event took place from 9 till 11 April 2003 in Djerba, Tunisia.
  • January 2003 WTO becomes a UN specialized body By Resolution 453 (XV), the Assembly agreed on the transformation of the WTO into a United Nations specialized body. Such transformation was later ratified by the United Nations General Assembly with the adoption of Resolution A/RES/58/232.
  • January 2002 World Ecotourism Summit Held in May 2002, in Quebec City, Canada, the Summit represented the most important event in the framework of the International Year of Ecosystem. The Summit identified as main themes: ecotourism policy and planning, regulation of ecotourism, product development, marketing and promotion of ecotourism and monitoring costs and benefits of ecotourism.
  • January 1985 Tourism Bill of Rights and Tourist Code At the World Tourism Organization Sixth Assembly held in Sofia in 1985, the Tourism Bill of Rights and Tourist Code were adopted, setting out the rights and duties of tourists and host populations and formulating policies and action for implementation by states and the tourist industry.
  • January 1982 Acapulco Document Adopted in 1982, the Acapulco Document acknowledges the new dimension and role of tourism as a positive instrument towards the improvement of the quality of life for all peoples, as well as a significant force for peace and international understanding. The Acapulco Document also urges Member States to elaborate their policies, plans and programmes on tourism, in accordance with their national priorities and within the framework of the programme of work of the World Tourism Organization.

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Travel, Tourism and Outdoor Recreation

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EDA Awards 185 Grants to Rebuild and Restrengthen American Travel, Tourism, and Outdoor Recreation

Travel, Tourism & Outdoor Recreation Fact Sheet  (PDF)

American Rescue Plan Fact Sheet  (PDF)

Click here to view the American Rescue Plan Map

Travel, Tourism and Outdoor Recreation ARP

The U.S. Economic Development Administration’s (EDA) Travel, Tourism, and Outdoor Recreation program invested $750 million in  American Rescue Plan  funding to support communities across the country whose economies were hard hit by damage to these sectors from the COVID-19 pandemic. With funding going to every state and territory across 185 awards, EDA’s investments are rebuilding the travel and tourism sector and creating a more equitable, competitive, and resilient industry.

Learn more about the Travel, Tourism, and Outdoor Recreation grantees by exploring the  American Rescue Plan Impact Map .

The Travel, Tourism, and Outdoor Recreation program is divided into two components:

  • State Tourism Grants:  $510 million in direct awards to help states quickly invest in marketing, infrastructure, workforce and other projects to rejuvenate safe leisure, business and international travel.
  • Competitive Grants:  $240 million to help communities that have been hardest hit by challenges facing the travel, tourism, and outdoor recreation sectors to invest in infrastructure, workforce, or other projects to support the recovery of the industry and economic resilience of the community in the future.

Each state or territory is utilizing its directly allocated funds to engage in activities that best support their travel, tourism, and outdoor recreation sectors. These activities include but are not limited to workforce training, new construction or upgrades to existing tourism infrastructure, tourism marketing and promotion, and tourism-related economic planning. The competitive grant program is distributed across 126 awards to support communities across the country as they rebuild and strengthen their travel, tourism, and outdoor recreation sectors. The competitive funding is expected to generate $1.1 billion in private investment and to create or save 10,291 jobs , according to grantee estimates. This program was designed to prioritize equity, and as a result, more than 50% of competitive awards are expected to directly benefit historically underserved communities and populations. In addition, $29.3 million across 12 awards is supporting coal communities and $21.2 million across 9 awards is supporting Indigenous communities.

Program Resources

  • Notice of Funding Opportunity
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  • Travel, Tourism and Outdoor Recreation presentation slides  (PDF)
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Secretary raimondo announces new national strategy to reenergize u.s. travel and tourism, office of public affairs.

Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo today announced a new National Travel and Tourism Strategy that focuses federal government efforts to support the U.S. travel and tourism industry and sets an ambitious five-year goal of attracting 90 million international visitors to the United States each year. It is estimated these visitors would spend $279 billion annually—expenditures that will support job creation in communities across the United States, its territories, and the District of Columbia.

The Tourism Policy Council , a federal interagency council created by Congress, was charged by Secretary Raimondo with creating the strategy to focus U.S. government efforts in support of the travel and tourism sector which has been deeply and disproportionally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The strategy follows a four-point approach to reduce the industry’s carbon footprint, create safe and secure checkpoints, and bolster travel and tourism in underserved and underrepresented communities across the country.

Specifically, the strategy aims to: promote the United States as a premier travel destination, including broadening marketing efforts to encourage visitation to underserved and underrepresented communities; facilitate safe and efficient travel to and within the United States and its territories; ensure diverse and accessible tourism experiences with a focus on showcasing the nation’s federal lands and waters while also protecting them for future generations; and foster resilient and sustainable travel and tourism with goals to reduce the sectors’ contributions to climate change while rebuilding sectors that protect natural resources, support the tourism economy and ensure equitable development. Read the strategy and the fact sheet .

“Across all 50 states, U.S. territories and the District of Columbia, communities are safely welcoming back visitors. From the crown jewels of our national parks and forests, to the historic and diverse sites that tell the story of our people and culture, the United States offers destinations for international travelers like no other,” said Secretary Raimondo. “The impact of COVID-19 has taken a toll on our national and local economies, but it also has presented us with a unique opportunity to mold a more inclusive, equitable, sustainable and resilient travel and tourism industry than ever before. Our new strategy leverages the best of what the U.S. public and private sectors offer, which will promote jobs, recover lost revenues, and inspire unforgettable experiences.”

The travel and tourism sector has historically been a critical force in economic growth and employment in the United States. When non-U.S. residents purchase goods and services while in the United States, it counts as export income for the U.S. economy.

In 2020, the Department’s  National Travel and Tourism Office  reported that the decline in travel and tourism to and within the United States accounted for 56% of the decline in U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), and travel exports dropped 65% in 2020 when compared to 2019, or pre-pandemic levels.

However, throughout 2021, as the Biden-Harris Administration implemented a robust vaccine rollout and effective travel policies centered around health and safety, along with lifting travel restrictions when it was safe to do so, monthly overseas arrivals to the United States increased from roughly 775,000 in October 2021 to more than 2 million in April 2022. As a result, international travel to the United States has generated a trade surplus in each of the past five months indicating a positive trend toward recovery even as international travel remains below pre-pandemic levels.

About the National Travel and Tourism Office The National Travel and Tourism Office, housed within the Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, and led by the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Analysis, is the federal government’s official source for U.S. travel and tourism statistics. For more information on the National Travel and Tourism Office statistics and research programs, including interactive data monitors, factsheets, and comprehensive downloads, please visit:   https://www.trade.gov/national-travel-and-tourism-office .

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Global fdi greenfield investment trends in tourism.

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Tourism Investment Report 2020

In association with fdi intelligence from the financial times.

For the third year in a row, the UNWTO has partnered with the fDi intelligence from the Financial Times to develop a joint publication on Tourism Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) analyzing data on Greenfield investments trends. The relevance of this report is pivotal to governments and investors because it exposed data on flows of capital, and destinations for investments providing insight on market trends for the tourism recovery.

In times of uncertainty, expertise and trusted information is more important than ever. This report provides investment and market data that both investors and stakeholders will need to maximize their impact of the sector in terms of economic growth, job creation and sustainability. Especially when around 100-120 million direct tourism jobs are at risk, which threatens to roll back the progress we have made in establishing tourism as a driver towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For this edition, the UNWTO’ Innovation, Digital Transformation and Investments department has developed an interactive report using data (2015-2019) from the fDi Intelligence on Tourism FDI.

The COVID-19 pandemic has hit the tourism sector hard; the data suggests that global FDI into tourism plummeted by 73.2% in the first half of 2020, compared with a year earlier. This put an end to the sector’s record high years. This data has a close relationship with the UNWTO’ scenarios for international tourist numbers decline, which could fall between 60 and 80% this year depending on the speed with which travel restrictions are lifted. This could translate into a loss of 850 million to 1.1 billion international tourist arrivals and a fall of $910 billion to $1.2 trillion in export revenues.

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Although, the investment cycle remained strong throughout 2019, with tourism mobilizing $61.8bn in global FDI, which, in turn, created more than 135,000 jobs. The trend appeared particularly consistent in Latin America and the Caribbean, where FDI reached new record levels. For example it created more than 56.000 jobs in Mexico from 2015 – 2019. Tourism FDI was also strong in the Middle East and Africa, where it rose to the highest level in a decade. However, almost half of all tourism investments globally (46.51%) are made at top 10 countries. From which around 30% of projects are concentrated in five countries: United Kingdom, United States, Germany, China, and Spain. It is important to notice that more than 30% of projects and of capital investment announced in the tourism cluster between 2015 and 2019 occurred in 2019.

The major sub sector that has led tourism investments are consider traditional investments, with construction as the main driver for around 57% of total Greenfield investments from 2015 to 2019. As such, the trends in accommodation are around
the sustainability where multinational companies are investing in green, and clean energy matrix of their operations. According to the fDi intelligence of the Financial Times, investors are paying increasing attention to the social and environmental footprint
of the projects they assess in tourism. They seem willing to prioritize developments that lift communities and preserve ecosystems, as long as financial sustainability is also taken into account.

Finally, there is also an increasing number of non-traditional investments related to services around software technologies that include: Travel arrangement & reservation services, Internet publishing, web search among other, which represent around 32% of total investments considering investments between 2015 - 2019. This data invites to research more about investments in technology as a source of FDI in the tourism sector. The Travel Tech startups have been introducing innovations in the tourism ecosystem, and they are constantly changing business models attracting more investors.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made clear that sustainable tourism requires that sustainable investments are at the center of new solutions, and not just of traditional investments that promote and underpin economic growth and productivity. It has also highlighted the importance of non-traditional investments that enhance innovation through the creation and diffusion of new solutions to decarbonize the sector. To harness the advantages of investments, it is critical that governments promote policies as well as new investment vehicles to recover, retain and attract foreign direct investments. Only this way can we reimagine tourism and enhance the sector’s positive impact on people and planet as we accelerate the achievement of SDGs.

The UNWTO is developing a series of investment guidelines to understand and generate sustainable investments and promote innovations in the tourism ecosystem. If you are interested in the UNWTO’ reports and guidelines to understand, enable and mobilize tourism investments , we invite you to register to receive the our investment updates.

Please feel free to download the full report:

Tourism Invesment 2020

TOURISM INVESTMENT 2020  

TOURISM INVESTMENT 2018

TOURISM INVESTMENT 2019  

TOURISM INVESTMENT 2018

TOURISM INVESTMENT 2018  

If you have questions about the report, or need more specific information about tourism investments white us an email to [email protected]

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Tourism ‘intrinsically susceptible’ to climate shocks, political unrest, pandemic threat

The Perhentian Islands in Terengganu, Malaysia.

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The President of the UN General Assembly on Tuesday highlighted the urgent need to boost sustainable and resilient tourism practices to protect the environment while continuing to benefit local economies.

Addressing a high-level meeting on tourism as part of the General Assembly’s first ever Sustainability Week , Dennis Francis said it was a vital driver of economic growth and empowerment .

In 2023, the sector contributed three per cent to the global gross domestic product (GDP), amounting to $3.3 trillion, and employed one in every ten people worldwide. For countries in special situations, like small island nations, tourism accounted for nearly 35 per cent of all export earnings and up to 80 per cent of national exports .

“Despite the spectacular benefits reaped across its vast supply chains – tourism is also intrinsically susceptible to a host of disruptive forces – such as climate change, pandemics, acts of terrorism, and domestic political instability,” Mr. Francis said.

Sustainable

He expressed concerns about the sector’s environmental and carbon footprint, saying sustainability must be paramount.

“We need a global tourism sector that is sustainable – one with deep local value chains that expand demand for locally made products and services in ways that also directly and positively benefit local communities,” he urged.

Moreover, he emphasized that the sector should also leverage digital technology to foster innovation and expand opportunities for jobs and economic growth, especially for women, youth, and indigenous and local communities.

“We also need a global tourism sector that is resilient,” said Mr. Francis, stressing the need to minimize its vulnerabilities and bolstering its ability to withstand external shocks.

This includes designing infrastructures that can withstand environmental disasters, fostering innovations that enhance economic and social resilience, and diversifying tourism activities to reduce recovery time after disruptive events.

Symbol of hope

Zurab Pololikashvili, head of the UN World Tourism Organization ( UNWTO ), also spoke at the General Assembly, noting that despite today’s pressing challenges, tourism offered a glimmer of hope.

Reflecting on the sector’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic – its most significant crisis in history – he observed that in 2023, international arrivals rebounded to almost 90 per cent of pre-pandemic levels , with full recovery expected by the end of 2024.

This recovery must serve as a catalyst for bold action and transformative change, he said, emphasizing, “tourism can – and must – be a part of this plan for a better future for all.”

Sustainability Week

The high-level event on tourism followed Monday’s deliberations on debt sustainability , where speakers outlined the crippling impact of debt on developing economies, and called for urgent reform of the global financial system.

Upcoming highlights of the week include dedicated discussions on sustainable transport, infrastructure and energy.

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Minister of Tourism celebrates Canada’s tourism businesses during National Tourism Week 2024

From: Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

The Honourable Soraya Martinez Ferrada, Minister of Tourism and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, made the following statement to mark National Tourism Week 2024

April 15, 2024 – Ottawa, Ontario

The Honourable Soraya Martinez Ferrada, Minister of Tourism and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, made the following statement to mark National Tourism Week 2024:

“On behalf of the Government of Canada, I want to wish all Canadians a happy National Tourism Week!

“Canada is a tourism superpower. We have majestic mountains, dynamic downtowns, friendly folks and so much more. We have what the world wants!

“National Tourism Week is a chance to celebrate the faces and places that make our country so special, including the millions of Canadians who work in tourism.

“This year’s theme is Canada: Powered by Tourism , and it’s not hard to see why. Tourism is a pillar of our economy, helping employ nearly one in ten Canadians and generating billions of dollars every year!

“The people in our tourism sector are more than workers: they are ambassadors for Canada. They are often the first Canadians that a visitor meets when they arrive, and the last ones they see before heading home. The industry is a leader in hiring women, newcomers and young people—even the Prime Minister had one of his first jobs in tourism!

“Tourism is also about pride—the pride of sharing your home with the world.

“Our government is here for Canadian tourism. Guided by our Federal Tourism Growth Strategy , we want to help the industry reach its full potential, invest in Indigenous tourism and overcome challenges so tourism can thrive.

“Tourism has incredible potential, and we’re seizing it. Our goal is to increase the sector’s contribution to Canada’s GDP by 40% by 2030, to $61 billion. This means roughly 85,000 more jobs stemming directly from tourism.

“It’s about more than statistics, however. It’s about Canada taking its place as a tourism superstar. That’s why we’re supporting businesses through the Tourism Growth Program , a $108 million investment in tourism businesses across the country.

“Indigenous tourism has the power to advance reconciliation while creating opportunities across Canada. Through initiatives such as the Indigenous Tourism Fund , we’re partnering with communities and leaders to seize these opportunities.

“Of course, tourism is not without challenges, and we’re working with the industry to overcome them. We’re helping businesses attract and retain more staff. We’re improving transportation and housing. We’re also addressing climate change, an existential threat to Canadian tourism.

“This week, I’m inviting you to discover the attractions that make your community and country so special. Tourism is powerful because it creates connections, finds common ground and brings people together—and we need that now more than ever.

“Happy National Tourism Week!”

Marie-Justine Torres Press Secretary Office of the Minister of Tourism and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec 613-327-5918 [email protected]

Media Relations Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada [email protected]

Stay connected

Follow Canadian Tourism on social media. X (Twitter):  @cdntourism

Follow Canada Business on social media. X (Twitter):  @canadabusiness | Facebook:  Canada Business

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Puerto Rico Tourism Company

The Puerto Rico Tourism Company recognizes that friendliness, disposition, and hospitality are the greatest attractions of our Island.  This program seeks to train employees and companies in the tourism sector to elevate the quality of service in Puerto Rico.

The Tourism Company presents Junte Boricua, a historic call to bring together all Puerto Ricans, from near and far, for a few months full of activities that will celebrate our Puerto Rican identity. Join this historic gathering!

Get to know the certified agrotourism companies! Discover what our land produces, learn from our farmers, and schedule tours to enrich your agro tourism experiences.

This is the first business acceleration program designed by the Tourism Company to catalyze growth and innovation in the tourism sector for SMEs in the industry through a series of workshops.

BUSINESS IN PUERTO RICO

Learn about investment opportunities, explore our culture, our beautiful natural settings, and experience the warmth of our people.

We are the main air and sea access hub in the Caribbean with multiple weekly flight options to and from the United States; including major cities in Latin America and Europe and ports that accommodate all types of vessels and cruise ships.

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Coming to Puerto Rico?

Enjoy your island.

Get to know its natural treasures, its attractions, its cultural events so that you can do internal tourism all year round.

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Estimated Cruise Passengers in 2023

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in SJU, PSE & BQN in 2023

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*January-December 2023

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Upcoming events, latest news, puerto rico listo para la llegada del icon of the seas, llegan el celebrity ascent y cerca de 18 mil visitantes a los muelles de san juan, arriba a puerto rico el norwegian viva, regresa la feria de artesanías de la compañía de turismo en su vigésimo sexta edición, llega a puerto rico el norwegian prima , emerald cruises escoge a puerto rico para lanzamiento de nueva embarcación , se registra crecimiento histórico de la línea aérea avianca en puerto rico, compañía de turismo lanza campaña de navidad con destacadas personalidades puertorriqueñas para impulsar el turismo interno, continúa incrementando actividad de cruceros en puerto rico, 2023: mejor año del turismo en la historia de puerto rico.

03

Government of the United States Virgin Islands

Governor Bryan and DSPR Commissioner Calvert White Detail Tourism and Carnival Horse Race Plans

U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS – Governor Albert Bryan Jr. hosted the weekly Government House briefing from Government House on St. Thomas today, highlighting his recent trip to the Sea Trade Global Conference and outlining plans for a tourism summit in July. Governor Bryan was joined by Sports, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Calvert White, who presented details about the upcoming Carnival Rebirth Horse Races on May 3, which will take place at the newly rebuilt Clinton E. Phipps Racetrack on St. Thomas.

While at Sea Trade last week, Governor Bryan participated in what he termed “a series of very productive and insightful engagements” with cruise industry partners and with the executive leadership of major cruise lines including Disney Cruise Line, Norwegian, MSC Cruises, Holland America, and Princess Caribbean.  

While in years past Governor Bryan discounted the importance of attending the Sea Trade conference, he said he has come to realize that the Sea Trade conference is actually “a cornerstone for future developments in our tourism sector,” particularly when it comes to the US Virgin Islands’ cruise line engagements.  

Governor Bryan called his meetings with cruise line executives “pivotal,” adding, “We exchanged a host of innovative ideas that, if realized, promise exciting prospects for our islands, especially St. Croix.”

Governor Bryan got a firsthand look at how the VI Department of Tourism uses data and analytics to learn where visitors like to go and what they like to do—something that ultimately promotes making better-informed decisions about the improvements needed for the Territory’s tourism product.  

To underscore the importance of cruise travel to the Territory, data provided at Sea Trade revealed that of the over 31 million cruise passengers, the U.S. Virgin Islands was a chosen destination by 5 percent of these travelers.

Governor Bryan acknowledged that tourism forms the backbone of the Territory’s economy, accounting for 70 percent of the USVI’s economic activity.

“The continuous improvements we make to our tourism product are vital,” Governor Bryan said. “They ensure that the U.S. Virgin Islands not only remain competitive but also set the standard in hospitality and service.”

Governor Bryan extended heartfelt congratulations to Tourism Commissioner Joseph Boschulte and the entire team at the Department of Tourism and  commended Carlton Dowe, Executive Director of the Virgin Islands Port Authority, and every member of VIPorts for enhancing the Territory’s ports and tourism infrastructure.  

Speaking of enhancing the Territory’s tourism infrastructure, Governor Bryan said the Territory will host its first-ever Governor’s Tourism Summit in July. This meeting is intended to serve as an industry debrief at the end of the season to analyze what worked and where the Territory needs to improve its tourism product. 

Commissioner Calvert White shared the latest on plans for the St. Thomas Carnival races, which will take place at the Clinton E. Phipps Racetrack on Friday, May 3.  

White thanked the staff of the Department of Sports Parks and Recreation, Southland Gaming and the Virgin Islands Police Department.

Restoring the racetrack, which had remained unused for seven years, meant “starting from the beginning,” White said. The racetrack’s running surface needed work. Equipment was purchased, as was 200 tons of sand.

“It was always DSPR and Southland Gaming’s intention to give the community a better experience than what we previously had,” White said. The grandstands are now three times the size of the original grandstands, and are at an elevated height of 10 ft – giving every seat excellent visibility, he said. A VIP section has been created that can accommodate 100 patrons, there will be seven drink stations, multiple food vendors, as well as metal detectors and scanners.

“Safety is and will always be our number one priority,” White said. Toward that end, whereas in the past tickets could only be purchased onsite, tickets can now be purchased online at Eventbrite, in advance, under “Rebirth of Carnival races.” This way lines will move faster with patrons using their QR codes to gain entry. General admission is $25 and tickets for children under 12 will be $5.

The Bryan-Roach Administration is investing in the Territory’s people, infrastructure, and future through transparency, stabilizing the economy, restoring trust in the government, and ensuring that recovery projects are completed as quickly as possible. Visit transparency.vi.gov

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COMMENTS

  1. FACT SHEET: 2022 National Travel and Tourism Strategy

    The federal government will work to implement the strategy under the leadership of the TPC and in partnership with the private sector, aiming toward an ambitious five-year goal of increasing American jobs by attracting and welcoming 90 million international visitors, who we estimate will spend $279 billion, annually by 2027.. The new National Travel and Tourism Strategy supports growth and ...

  2. Travel and Tourism

    June 6, 2022. Press releases. Commerce Secretary Gina M. Raimondo today announced a new National Travel and Tourism Strategy that focuses federal government efforts to support the U.S. travel and tourism industry and sets an ambitious five-year goal of attracting 90 million international visitors to the United States each year.

  3. PDF National Travel Tourism Strategy

    2022 National Travel and Tourism Strategy. Focuses federal efforts to support travel and tourism in the United States. Establishes a five-year goal of attracting 90 million visitors, who will spend $279 billion annually. Envisions private and public sectors working together to increase the volume and value of tourism.

  4. National Travel and Tourism Strategy Overview

    The Strategy focuses on U.S. government efforts to promote our nation as a premier destination grounded in the breadth and diversity of its communities, and to foster a travel and tourism sector that drives economic growth, creates good jobs, and bolsters conservation and sustainability. Drawing on engagement and capabilities from across the ...

  5. U.S. Tourism: Economic Impacts and Pandemic Recovery

    Further, while gross domestic product (GDP) for the United States as a whole grew at a 5.9% rate in 2021, travel and tourism GDP grew by 64.4% that year.2 Congress has taken an interest in tourism generally for decades, and has specifically been interested in the industry's recovery following the pandemic.

  6. National Travel and Tourism Office

    The National Travel and Tourism Office is the official USG source for travel and tourism statistics, ... As is laid out in the National Travel and Tourism Strategy, the U.S. government is working to increase not only the volume, but the value of travel and tourism to the United States. Across all of our work, we are striving to make sure ...

  7. National Travel and Tourism Strategy

    Travel and tourism is a critical driver of economic growth and employment in the United States and integral to the United States' unmatched cultural reach.¹ Supporting some 9.5 million American jobs through $1.9 trillion of economic activity, travel and tourism is an engine of prosperity and opportunity in communities across the country - from the bright lights and bustling streets of the ...

  8. Reenergizing U.S. Travel and Tourism with Assistant Secretary of

    There is a Tourism Policy Council that connects all of our departments and agencies across the U.S. Government, and it's chaired by the Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo. This brings a whole-of-government focus to our efforts on travel and tourism, and it was this body that created the new strategy that was referenced.

  9. The why, how, and what of public policy implications of tourism and

    1. Introduction. The tourism and hospitality industry creates an inflow of both local and foreign income and employment opportunities, prompting infrastructure development and positive economic growth (Comerio & Strozzi, 2019).In terms of social development, the industry also alleviates socio-economic challenges such as unemployment, inequality, and poverty by providing opportunities and ...

  10. From Crisis to Transformation: Tourism and the 2030 Agenda for ...

    The first product of this forward-looking partnership is the "Tourism Recovery Playbook", designed to help destinations and business harness the power of digital and visual storytelling to reach new audiences and return to growth, launched on 9 November 2021.On the back of this, Instagram again supported UNWTO as an active participant in the first edition of the Global Youth Tourism Summit ...

  11. Rebuilding tourism for the future: COVID-19 policy responses and ...

    The outlook for the tourism sector remains highly uncertain. The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues to hit hard, with international tourism expected to decrease by around 80% in 2020. Domestic tourism is helping to soften the blow, at least partially, and governments have taken impressive immediate action to restore and re-activate the sector, while protecting jobs and businesses.

  12. Travel and Tourism

    Travel and Tourism Satellite Account for 2017-2021 The travel and tourism industry—as measured by the real output of goods and services sold directly to visitors—increased 64.4 percent in 2021 after decreasing 50.7 percent in 2020, according to the most recent statistics from BEA's Travel and Tourism Sate

  13. COVID-19 and reimagining the tourism economy

    The Tourism Exchange Australia (TXA) platform, which was created by the Australian government, is an example of enabling at scale. It acts as a matchmaker, connecting suppliers with distributors and intermediaries to create packages attractive to a specific segment of tourists, then uses tourist engagement to provide further analytical insights ...

  14. Sustainable tourism

    Tourism is one of the world's fastest growing industries and an important source of foreign exchange and employment, while being closely linked to the social, economic, and environmental well-being of many countries, especially developing countries. Maritime or ocean-related tourism, as well as coastal tourism, are for example vital sectors of the economy in small island developing States ...

  15. The Impact of Tourism on Local Government Expenditures

    The aim of this study is to broaden the understanding of the impact of tourism on local government expenditures. Specifically, a regression model is developed to examine the hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between the degree of reliance of the local economy on tourism and local government expenditures.

  16. Exploring the relationship between government and destination

    Countries around the world try to design and adopt strategies, methods, and tools that allow them to attract tourism and achieve a competitive advantage (Petrevska & Collins-Kreiner, 2017).Tourism planning is complex and involves social, economic, and political influences (see Agarwal, 2002).Therefore, government's role in this new theoretical model assumes government officials provide the ...

  17. Travel, Tourism and Outdoor Recreation

    The Travel, Tourism, and Outdoor Recreation program is divided into two components: State Tourism Grants: $510 million in direct awards to help states quickly invest in marketing, infrastructure, workforce and other projects to rejuvenate safe leisure, business and international travel. Competitive Grants: $240 million to help communities that ...

  18. COVID-19-related government interventions and travel ...

    COVID-19 and the related government interventions have significantly affected tourism, resulting in majority of studies on the economic impacts on tourism ( Altuntas & Gok, 2021; Gössling, Scott, & Hall, 2020a; Yang, Zhang, & Chen, 2020; Zhang, Song, Wen, & Liu, 2021 ). Gössling et al. (2020b) find that social distancing restrictions, such as ...

  19. Secretary Raimondo Announces New National Strategy to Reenergize U.S

    The Tourism Policy Council, a federal interagency council created by Congress, was charged by Secretary Raimondo with creating the strategy to focus U.S. government efforts in support of the travel and tourism sector which has been deeply and disproportionally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The strategy follows a four-point approach to ...

  20. The Impact of Tourism on Local Government Expenditures

    The aim of this study is to broaden the understanding of the impact of tourism on local government expenditures. Specifically, a regression model is developed to examine the hypothesis that there is a direct relationship between the degree of reliance of the local economy on tourism and local government expenditures.

  21. PDF National Travel Tourism Strategy Update

    government with the resources and expertise of travel and tourism businesses. `zPartnerzwithzState,zLocal,zTribal,zandzTerritorialzGovernments.. Join non-federal tourism authorities in place-based and activity-based promotional campaigns. Provide grants and technical assistance to qualified public sector entities to support their efforts to

  22. The role of government in tourism: The critical "how"

    For the Tourism sector that Conductor is the government of the destination, the source of vision, inspiration and disciplining direction which turns passion into proud, purposeful, clearly ...

  23. Tourism and justice: Rethinking the role of governments

    According to Raymond Rastegar, stronger government intervention in tourism is required to promote justice, particularly in developing countries. 156. Policymakers must ensure a fair distribution ...

  24. Tourism Investment Report 2020

    This could translate into a loss of 850 million to 1.1 billion international tourist arrivals and a fall of $910 billion to $1.2 trillion in export revenues. Although, the investment cycle remained strong throughout 2019, with tourism mobilizing $61.8bn in global FDI, which, in turn, created more than 135,000 jobs.

  25. COVID-19 economic policy response, resilience and tourism recovery

    Abstract. This study investigates whether tourism sector recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic is influenced by only the size of the economic stimulus packages or whether a country's resilience plays a moderating influence in the underlying relationship. The results show that while economic stimulus packages help to enhance tourism recovery from ...

  26. Tourism 'intrinsically susceptible' to climate shocks, political unrest

    Addressing a high-level meeting on tourism as part of the General Assembly's first ever Sustainability Week, Dennis Francis said it was a vital driver of economic growth and empowerment.. In 2023, the sector contributed three per cent to the global gross domestic product (GDP), amounting to $3.3 trillion, and employed one in every ten people worldwide.

  27. Minister of Tourism celebrates Canada's tourism businesses during

    The Honourable Soraya Martinez Ferrada, Minister of Tourism and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, made the following statement to mark National Tourism Week 2024: "On behalf of the Government of Canada, I want to wish all Canadians a happy National Tourism Week!

  28. Home

    The Puerto Rico Tourism Company (PRTC), founded in 1970, is a public corporation responsible for stimulating, promoting, and regulating the development of Puerto Rico's tourism industry. 2 Paseo La Princesa, San Juan, PR 00902 Phone: (787) 721-2400 Email: [email protected]

  29. Greater Washington tourism added to CBRE REVIVE Regional Vibrancy Index

    Government spending on local contracts within Greater Washington is down 14.7% from its peak in July, given political inertia, which also weighs down the index.

  30. Governor Bryan and DSPR Commissioner Calvert White Detail Tourism and

    U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS - Governor Albert Bryan Jr. hosted the weekly Government House briefing from Government House on St. Thomas today, highlighting his recent trip to the Sea Trade Global Conference and outlining plans for a tourism summit in July. Governor Bryan was joined by Sports, Parks and Recreation Commissioner Calvert White, who presented details … Governor Bryan and DSPR ...