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“The Journey” by Mary Oliver: A Complete Analysis

March 8, 2024 | by poemread.com

The Journey by Mary Oliver_An Analysis

Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” is a beacon of inspiration for those standing at the crossroads of change. It’s a poem that speaks to the soul’s deepest yearning for freedom and self-discovery. In this analysis, we’ll delve into the essence of Oliver’s work, exploring the subject, context, theme, tone, and structure that make “The Journey” a masterpiece of modern poetry.

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The context of ‘the journey’, the theme of “the journey” by mary oliver, the tone of the poem, the form and structure of the poem, line-by-line analysis.

  • Poetic and Literary Devices in "The Journey"

Interactive Summary of “The Journey”

Mary Oliver, born on September 10, 1935, in Maple Heights, Ohio, was a poet celebrated for her profound connection to the natural world and her ability to capture its essence with clarity and simplicity. Growing up in semi-rural Ohio, Oliver found solace in nature from a young age, which would become a central theme in her poetry.

Despite facing personal challenges, she turned to writing as a means of coping and self-expression, beginning her poetic journey at just 14 years old. Oliver’s literary career blossomed with the publication of her first collection, “No Voyage and Other Poems,” in 1963, paving the way for a series of acclaimed works that earned her numerous accolades, including the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1984 for “American Primitive.”

Throughout her career, Oliver’s poetry remained rooted in her love for nature, exploring themes of life, death, and the human experience with profound insight and accessibility. Though she passed away on January 17, 2019, her legacy lives on through her timeless poetry, which continues to inspire and resonate with readers worldwide, offering solace and guidance on life’s journey.

Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” is more than just a poem; it’s a reflection of a pivotal moment in the author’s life, as well as a universal call to self-reliance and integrity. First appearing in her 1963 collection “No Voyage and Other Poems,” this piece stands out as one of Oliver’s more personal works, weaving in threads of her own experiences with broader, relatable themes.

A Personal Undertone

The poem’s context is deeply rooted in Oliver’s own narrative. It speaks to the importance of taking charge of one’s life, a theme that resonates with the poet’s personal journey of overcoming negative influences and finding her own voice. The authenticity of the poem is heightened by its references to real events in Oliver’s life, making it a testament to the power of personal transformation.

A Universal Appeal

While “The Journey” is intimate in its origins, its message extends far beyond the personal. It taps into the collective experience of facing life’s challenges and the courage required to step away from the familiar and venture into the unknown. The poem encapsulates the struggle between the comfort of conformity and the daunting, yet rewarding, path of individuality.

The Metaphorical Path

Oliver uses the metaphor of a journey not just as a physical voyage but as an emotional and psychological expedition. The poem captures the tumultuous process of leaving behind an “unhealthy life” to embark on a new, more authentic existence. It’s about the critical juncture where one decides to listen to their inner voice, despite the cacophony of external pressures and expectations.

The Voice of Change

As the poem progresses, the transformation becomes evident. The initial chaos and struggle give way to a sense of purpose and clarity. The “new voice” that emerges is a symbol of self-discovery and empowerment, guiding the protagonist—and, by extension, the reader—towards a life that is truly their own.

Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” is a profound exploration of self-discovery and the courage to embrace change. The poem’s central theme revolves around the importance of self-reliance and integrity, urging readers to take charge of their own lives and leave behind negative influences.

Self-Reliance as a Beacon

The theme of self-reliance is the poem’s guiding light. It illuminates the path to personal freedom and authenticity. Oliver’s words encourage us to listen to our inner voice, even when it leads us away from the comfort of the known and into the wilderness of the self.

Integrity Amidst the Noise

Integrity is another cornerstone of the poem. It’s about staying true to oneself in a world that often demands conformity. The poem depicts the struggle of the individual against the cacophony of external pressures and the triumph of personal conviction over collective expectations.

The Journey of Change

Change is an inevitable part of life, and Oliver’s poem embraces this reality. It speaks to the transformative power of taking bold steps towards a new life, even when the path is fraught with obstacles and uncertainty.

Renewal and Strength

Renewal and strength emerge as sub-themes, particularly towards the poem’s conclusion. As the protagonist strides deeper into the world, there’s a sense of rejuvenation and the dawning of a new chapter. This represents the inner strength required to forge one’s own path and the optimism that accompanies such a journey.

The tone of Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” is a complex interplay of encouragement and solemnity, reflecting the poem’s deep exploration of personal growth and self-discovery. It begins with a sense of urgency and seriousness as the speaker recognizes the need for change. The “voices” of doubt and discouragement that the person must overcome emphasize this seriousness by adding a layer of tension and conflict to the poem’s opening lines.

As the poem progresses, the tone shifts to one of resilience and hope. Despite the challenges and “the wind pried with its stiff fingers at the very foundations,” there is a sense of determination and strength that begins to emerge. The speaker’s journey is fraught with obstacles, yet there is an underlying current of optimism that propels them forward.

The culmination of the poem has a tone of triumph and liberation. The “new voice” that the speaker hears and recognizes as their own signifies a breakthrough, a moment of clarity, and empowerment. The stars burning “through the sheets of clouds” serve as a metaphor for this newfound enlightenment and freedom.

Throughout “The Journey,” Oliver masterfully uses tone to convey the emotional landscape of the speaker’s journey. It has a tone that resonates with many readers, as it captures the universal experience of overcoming adversity to find one’s true self. The poem’s tone, therefore, is not just a reflection of the speaker’s internal state but also an invitation to the reader to embark on their own journey of self-discovery.

Uncover the transformative journey in Mary Oliver's "The Journey," a beacon of inspiration for self-discovery and resilience. Dive into its depth!

The form and structure of Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” are integral to its impact as a work of poetry. The poem is composed in free verse, which means it doesn’t adhere to traditional patterns of meter or rhyme. This choice reflects the poem’s theme of breaking free from the constraints of the past and embarking on a new path.

The poem’s form is fluid, with lines that vary in length and create a sense of natural speech. This mirrors the journey’s unpredictable nature, where there is no set pattern to follow, and each step is taken based on instinct and necessity rather than predetermined rules.

“The Journey” is structured as a single, unbroken stanza of thirty-six lines. This uninterrupted flow of text represents the continuous movement forward that the speaker experiences. The lack of stanza breaks also suggests that the journey is a singular, transformative experience that cannot be segmented or paused.

Line Breaks

Oliver uses line breaks strategically to emphasize key moments and to control the poem’s rhythm. These breaks can signify a pause for reflection, or a breath taken in the midst of a revelation. They guide the reader through the emotional landscape of the poem, creating a pace that mirrors the speaker’s internal journey.

Punctuation

The minimal use of punctuation in “The Journey” contributes to the poem’s sense of urgency and immediacy. By forgoing the typical constraints of punctuation, Oliver allows the reader to move more freely through the text, experiencing the poem’s momentum and the speaker’s determination to forge ahead.

While “The Journey” largely eschews a regular rhyme scheme, Oliver does incorporate moments of half or slant rhyme as well as occasional full rhymes. These instances provide a subtle rhythmic unity without confining the poem to a strict pattern. They serve as reminders of the poem’s literary craft, even as it celebrates the freedom of form and content.

As for the meter, “The Journey” does not follow a strict metrical structure. This is typical of free-verse poetry. They often prioritize the natural cadence of speech over a regular metrical pattern. The lack of a fixed meter allows the poem to mirror the ebb and flow of the speaker’s thoughts and emotions. This contributes to the narrative’s authenticity and immediacy.

In summary, the form and structure of “The Journey” are carefully crafted to reflect the poem’s central themes. The free verse form, the single stanza structure, the strategic line breaks, the minimal punctuation, and the occasional rhymes all work together to create a poem that is as much about the journey of reading as it is about the journey it describes.

Line 1-2: “One day you finally knew / what you had to do, and began,”

Here, Oliver sets the stage for the protagonist’s journey towards self-realization. The use of “you” makes the poem immediately relatable, inviting readers to step into the shoes of the protagonist as they embark on their own quest for clarity and purpose.

Line 3-5: “though the voices around you / kept shouting / their bad advice —”

These lines illustrate the external pressures and distractions that often hinder personal growth. The “voices” represent societal expectations and influences, urging the protagonist to conform to conventional norms rather than follow their true calling.

“Shouting” emphasizes the persistence and intrusiveness of these outside pressures. The advice is labeled “bad” because it conflicts with the speaker’s newfound understanding and the journey they must undertake.

Line 6-7: “though the whole house / began to tremble”

The “house” likely represents the speaker’s life or the environment they are familiar with. It’s a metaphor for the established order that is now being questioned. Furthermore, the trembling house serves as a metaphor for the upheaval caused by the protagonist’s decision to break free from societal constraints. It symbolizes the resistance and chaos that accompany moments of radical change.

Line 8-9: “and you felt the old tug / at your ankles.”

This line conveys the resistance to change, the pull of past habits, and the comfort of the known, which attempts to keep the speaker from moving forward. Additionally, the specificity of “ankles” implies a force that tries to hold the speaker down, preventing them from taking steps towards their journey.

Line 10-11: “‘Mend my life!’ / each voice cried.”

The repetition of “Mend my life!” emphasizes the desperation of the voices clamoring for attention. It highlights the protagonist’s struggle to reconcile their own desires with the demands of others, echoing the universal conflict between self-care and external obligations. The collective nature of the “voices” underscores the overwhelming nature of the demands and expectations placed upon the speaker.

Line 12-13: “But you didn’t stop. / You knew what you had to do,”

These lines convey the protagonist’s resolute determination to follow their own path, despite the cacophony of conflicting voices. It underscores the importance of inner conviction and self-assurance in the face of adversity.

Line 14-15: “though the wind pried / with its stiff fingers”

The personification of the wind, “prying with its stiff fingers,” evokes a sense of relentless pressure and resistance. It symbolizes the external forces that seek to deter the protagonist from their chosen course, yet ultimately fail to sway their resolve.

Line 16-18: “at the very foundations, / though their melancholy / was terrible.”

The foundations represent the most fundamental aspects of the speaker’s life. The wind’s prying suggests that the journey is shaking the speaker to their core, challenging their most deeply held beliefs or sense of security. Then, the melancholy likely refers to the voices or the emotional atmosphere surrounding the speaker.

It’s a collective sadness that weighs heavily on the speaker, adding emotional depth to the physical struggle. Additionally, the word “terrible” conveys the intensity of the emotional struggle. It’s not just passing sadness, but a powerful sense of despair that the speaker must overcome.

Line 19-20: “It was already late / enough, and a wild night,”

These lines convey a sense of urgency and peril as the protagonist confronts the daunting task of self-discovery amidst the darkness of uncertainty. The “wild night” serves as a metaphor for the difficult journey ahead, filled with obstacles and unknown dangers.

Line 21-22: “and the road full of fallen / branches and stones.”

The imagery of the road strewn with obstacles—fallen branches and stones—underscores the challenges inherent in forging a new path. It symbolizes the difficulties and setbacks that accompany personal growth, yet it also hints at the potential for transformation and renewal.

Line 23-24: “But little by little, / as you left their voice behind,”

Here, Oliver captures the gradual process of shedding external influences and embracing inner clarity. The protagonist begins to distance themselves from the voices of doubt and conformity, moving closer towards self-realization with each step.

Line 25-26: “the stars began to burn / through the sheets of clouds,”

This line heralds a shift in perspective, as the stars piercing through the clouds symbolize moments of illumination and insight. It suggests that clarity emerges from the darkness, guiding the protagonist towards a deeper understanding of their own truth.

Moreover, clouds often represent confusion or obstacles. The stars’ ability to shine through the clouds suggests that the speaker’s newfound clarity is powerful enough to overcome any remaining uncertainty or barriers.

Line 27-29: “and there was a new voice / which you slowly / recognized as your own,”

The emergence of a new voice represents the speaker’s own thoughts and desires becoming clearer and more influential as they progress on their journey. The adverb “slowly” reinforces the gradual nature of the speaker’s transformation and the careful attention they are paying to this emerging sense of self.

Furthermore, recognition of the voice as their own signifies a moment of self-realization and acceptance, a critical step in the journey towards autonomy and authenticity. Overall, these lines signify the protagonist’s transition from uncertainty to confidence as they embrace their authentic identity and purpose.

Lines 30-31: “that kept you company / as you strode deeper and deeper”

This line conveys a sense of companionship and reassurance, as the newfound inner voice accompanies the protagonist on their journey of self-exploration. It suggests a growing sense of self-assurance and resilience in the face of adversity.

Line 32-33: “into the world, / determined to do”

The protagonist’s determination to venture “deeper and deeper into the world” reflects their commitment to fully engage with life’s challenges and opportunities. It underscores their resolve to pursue their own path with courage and conviction.

Line 34-35: “the only thing you could do — / determined to save”

In these final lines, Oliver encapsulates the essence of the protagonist’s journey: the unwavering commitment to save themselves. It emphasizes the importance of self-care and self-preservation, reminding readers that true salvation begins with honoring one’s own needs and aspirations.

Line 36- “the only life that you could save .”  

The poem concludes with a powerful statement of self-preservation and empowerment. The speaker recognizes that the most important life they can save is their own, emphasizing the ultimate responsibility each person has for their own happiness and destiny.

Check this video of Chris Thile, reciting the poem “The Journey.”

Poetic and Literary Devices in “The Journey”

1. Metaphor: Throughout the poem, Mary Oliver employs metaphorical language to convey deeper meanings. The journey described in the poem serves as a metaphor for personal growth and self-discovery, symbolizing the protagonist’s transformative experience.

2. Personification: Oliver personifies abstract concepts such as “the voices” and “the wind,” giving them human-like qualities. This literary device adds depth to the poem by making these elements feel more tangible and relatable to the reader.

3. Imagery: Vivid imagery is used to paint a picture of the protagonist’s inner and outer landscape. The descriptions of the trembling house, the wind prying with its stiff fingers, and the road full of fallen branches and stones evoke a sense of turmoil and uncertainty, mirroring the protagonist’s internal struggles.

4. Repetition: The repetition of the phrase “Mend my life!” emphasizes the persistence of external pressures and the protagonist’s resolve to overcome them. This repetition adds rhythm and emphasis to the poem, reinforcing its central themes.

5. Symbolism: Various symbols are employed throughout the poem to convey deeper meanings. For example, the stars burning through the clouds symbolize moments of clarity and insight, while the protagonist’s recognition of their own voice represents a newfound sense of self-awareness and empowerment.

6. Enjambment: Oliver utilizes enjambment, or the continuation of a sentence without a pause beyond the end of a line, to create a sense of flow and momentum in the poem. This technique adds to the fluidity of the narrative, allowing the reader to experience the journey alongside the protagonist in real-time.

7. Alliteration: The repetition of consonant sounds, such as in the phrase “though the wind pried with its stiff fingers,” creates a sense of rhythm and musicality in the poem. This use of alliteration adds to the overall texture and aesthetic appeal of the writing.

“ The Journey ” by Mary Oliver is a compelling poem that narrates the emotional and mental challenges one faces when deciding to leave behind an unhealthy life and start anew. The speaker, using second-person narration, invites the reader to step into the shoes of someone who has reached a pivotal moment in their life, recognizing the need for change. Despite the clamor of voices urging a return to the past, the individual persists, braving an uneven path toward a new existence.

As the poem unfolds, it’s revealed that the journey is fraught with obstacles, symbolized by the wind, a wild night, and a road scattered with debris. Yet, the traveler perseveres, gradually distancing themselves from the voices of the past and drawing strength from within. A new voice emerges, one that the traveler slowly recognizes as their own, providing companionship and guidance as they delve deeper into uncharted territory.

The poem concludes with a powerful realization: the only life a traveler can save is their own. This epiphany encapsulates the themes of self-reliance, strength, and renewal that are woven throughout the narrative.

The structure of the poem, free from rigid rhyme schemes, mirrors the theme of liberation, while the use of poetic devices like metaphor, enjambment, and imagery enriches the text with rhythmic unity and emotional depth.

In essence, “The Journey” is a testament to the transformative power of self-discovery and the indomitable human spirit’s ability to overcome adversity and chart a new course.

If you’re curious about Mary Oliver’s poetry , don’t miss her acclaimed work “Wild Geese,” which beautifully captures the essence of nature and humanity.

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Exploring the Depths of “The Journey”: A Literary Analysis by Mary Oliver

  • Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver’s poem “The Journey” is a powerful and introspective piece that delves into the complexities of personal growth and transformation. In this literary analysis, we will explore the themes, symbolism, and language used in the poem to gain a deeper understanding of its meaning and significance. Through an examination of Oliver’s poetic techniques and the imagery she employs, we will uncover the rich layers of meaning that make “The Journey” such a timeless and resonant piece of literature.

Background Information

Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” is a poem that explores the theme of self-discovery and the journey towards finding one’s true self. Oliver was an American poet who was known for her nature-inspired poetry and her ability to capture the beauty of the natural world in her writing. She was born in Ohio in 1935 and began writing poetry at a young age. Oliver’s work has been widely praised for its simplicity and its ability to connect with readers on a deep emotional level. “The Journey” is one of her most famous poems and has been widely anthologized and studied in literature classes around the world. In this article, we will explore the themes and literary devices used in “The Journey” and examine how Oliver’s writing style contributes to the poem’s overall impact.

Themes Explored in “The Journey”

In “The Journey,” Mary Oliver explores several themes that are central to the human experience. One of the most prominent themes is the idea of self-discovery and personal growth. The poem follows the speaker as she embarks on a journey of self-discovery, leaving behind the familiar and venturing into the unknown. Along the way, she confronts her fears and doubts, and ultimately emerges stronger and more self-assured.

Another important theme in the poem is the idea of transformation. The speaker undergoes a profound transformation over the course of her journey, shedding her old self and embracing a new, more authentic version of herself. This theme is closely tied to the idea of self-discovery, as the speaker’s journey of transformation is driven by her desire to understand herself more deeply and to live a more fulfilling life.

Finally, “The Journey” explores the theme of perseverance and resilience. The speaker faces numerous challenges and setbacks on her journey, but she never gives up. Instead, she draws on her inner strength and determination to keep moving forward, even when the path ahead is uncertain. This theme is particularly relevant in today’s world, where many people are facing difficult and uncertain times. “The Journey” reminds us that we have the power to overcome adversity and emerge stronger on the other side.

Symbolism in “The Journey”

Symbolism in “The Journey” is a crucial element that adds depth and meaning to the poem. Throughout the poem, Oliver uses various symbols to represent the journey of self-discovery and transformation. One of the most prominent symbols in the poem is the forest. The forest represents the unknown and the journey into the depths of oneself. It is a place of darkness and mystery, but also a place of growth and transformation. The speaker must navigate through the forest to reach their destination, just as one must navigate through the unknown to find themselves. Another symbol in the poem is the river. The river represents the flow of life and the journey of time. It is a symbol of change and transformation, as the speaker must cross the river to reach their destination. The river also represents the power of nature and the forces that guide us on our journey. Overall, the symbolism in “The Journey” adds depth and meaning to the poem, allowing readers to explore the themes of self-discovery and transformation in a more profound way.

Imagery in “The Journey”

In “The Journey,” Mary Oliver uses vivid imagery to convey the speaker’s emotional journey. The poem begins with the speaker standing at the edge of a forest, symbolizing the beginning of a new journey. The forest is described as “dark” and “dense,” creating a sense of mystery and uncertainty. As the speaker begins to walk, they encounter various obstacles, such as “rivers” and “mountains,” which represent the challenges and hardships of life.

Oliver also uses animal imagery to convey the speaker’s emotions. The speaker encounters a “black bear” and a “snake,” both of which are traditionally associated with fear and danger. However, the speaker is able to overcome their fear and continue on their journey. The “wild geese” that the speaker encounters towards the end of the poem represent freedom and the possibility of a new beginning.

Overall, Oliver’s use of imagery in “The Journey” helps to create a vivid and emotional experience for the reader. The imagery not only helps to convey the speaker’s journey, but also allows the reader to connect with their own personal journey and the obstacles they may face along the way.

Structure and Form of “The Journey”

The structure and form of “The Journey” by Mary Oliver is a significant aspect of the poem’s impact on the reader. The poem is composed of three stanzas, each with a different number of lines. The first stanza has six lines, the second has nine, and the third has seven. This structure creates a sense of progression and development throughout the poem. The first stanza introduces the speaker’s desire for change, the second stanza explores the challenges and obstacles she faces on her journey, and the third stanza concludes with the speaker’s realization and acceptance of her transformation.

Additionally, the poem’s form is characterized by its use of metaphor and imagery. Oliver uses the metaphor of a forest to represent the speaker’s journey, with the trees symbolizing the obstacles and challenges she must overcome. The use of vivid imagery, such as “the dark woods, the blue hills,” and “the long, difficult path,” further emphasizes the difficulty of the journey.

Overall, the structure and form of “The Journey” work together to create a powerful and impactful poem that explores the themes of transformation and self-discovery.

The Role of Nature in “The Journey”

Nature plays a significant role in “The Journey” by Mary Oliver. Throughout the poem, the speaker is on a journey through the wilderness, and the natural world serves as both a guide and a source of inspiration. The speaker is in awe of the beauty and power of nature, and this appreciation is reflected in the language and imagery used throughout the poem. The natural world is also a symbol of the speaker’s own inner journey, as she navigates through the challenges and uncertainties of life. Overall, the role of nature in “The Journey” is to provide a sense of wonder and perspective, and to remind us of the interconnectedness of all things.

The Use of Language in “The Journey”

In “The Journey,” Mary Oliver uses language to convey the transformative power of self-discovery. The poem is written in a conversational tone, with simple and direct language that allows the reader to easily connect with the speaker’s journey. Oliver uses vivid imagery to describe the physical landscape, which serves as a metaphor for the speaker’s internal journey. The use of repetition, particularly in the phrase “you knew,” emphasizes the speaker’s growing self-awareness and confidence. Additionally, the use of the second person point of view invites the reader to participate in the journey and encourages self-reflection. Overall, Oliver’s use of language in “The Journey” effectively conveys the theme of personal growth and the importance of self-discovery.

Analysis of the Speaker’s Journey

Throughout “The Journey,” the speaker undergoes a transformative journey that takes her from a place of fear and uncertainty to one of courage and self-discovery. At the beginning of the poem, the speaker is hesitant to embark on her journey, unsure of what lies ahead and afraid of the unknown. However, as she begins to move forward, she finds strength in her own resilience and determination, and she begins to embrace the challenges that come her way.

One of the most striking aspects of the speaker’s journey is the way in which she confronts her own fears and doubts. Rather than allowing these emotions to hold her back, she uses them as a source of motivation, pushing herself to keep moving forward even when the path ahead seems daunting. This resilience is particularly evident in the lines “But little by little, / as you left their voices behind, / the stars began to burn / through the sheets of clouds, / and there was a new voice / which you slowly / recognized as your own.” Here, the speaker is able to find her own voice and her own sense of purpose, even in the face of adversity.

Another key element of the speaker’s journey is the way in which she connects with the natural world around her. Throughout the poem, she draws strength and inspiration from the landscape, finding solace in the beauty of the mountains, the rivers, and the stars. This connection to nature is particularly evident in the lines “You knew what you had to do, / though the wind pried / with its stiff fingers / at the very foundations, / though their melancholy / was terrible.” Here, the speaker is able to find a sense of peace and clarity even in the midst of a storm, drawing on the power of the natural world to guide her forward.

Overall, the speaker’s journey in “The Journey” is a powerful testament to the human spirit and the resilience of the human soul. Through her struggles and triumphs, she is able to find her own voice and her own sense of purpose, and she emerges from her journey stronger and more self-assured than ever before.

Comparison to Other Works by Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver is a prolific poet, and “The Journey” is just one of her many works. When compared to her other poems, “The Journey” stands out for its simplicity and accessibility. Unlike some of her more abstract and complex works, “The Journey” is straightforward and easy to understand. This makes it a great entry point for readers who are new to Oliver’s poetry. However, despite its simplicity, “The Journey” still manages to convey deep and profound truths about life and the human experience. In this way, it is a testament to Oliver’s skill as a poet and her ability to connect with readers on a deep level.

Reception and Interpretation of “The Journey”

The reception and interpretation of Mary Oliver’s poem “The Journey” has been varied and complex. Some readers have found the poem to be a powerful meditation on the process of self-discovery and the importance of taking risks in order to grow and change. Others have interpreted the poem as a commentary on the challenges of navigating the world as a woman, and the need to break free from societal expectations and constraints in order to find one’s true path. Still others have seen the poem as a reflection on the human condition more broadly, and the universal struggle to find meaning and purpose in life. Whatever one’s interpretation of “The Journey,” it is clear that the poem has resonated deeply with readers around the world, and continues to inspire and challenge us to explore the depths of our own inner landscapes.

Impact of “The Journey” on Contemporary Poetry

“The Journey” by Mary Oliver has had a significant impact on contemporary poetry. The poem’s themes of self-discovery, resilience, and the power of nature have resonated with readers and writers alike. Many poets have been inspired by Oliver’s use of vivid imagery and her ability to capture the essence of the human experience. “The Journey” has also influenced the way poets approach the idea of a personal journey, encouraging them to explore their own paths and find meaning in their experiences. Overall, “The Journey” has become a touchstone for contemporary poets, a reminder of the transformative power of poetry and the importance of finding one’s own way in the world.”

The Significance of “The Journey” in Oliver’s Body of Work

Throughout her body of work, Mary Oliver has consistently explored the theme of “the journey.” Whether it be a physical journey through nature or an emotional journey through the human experience, Oliver’s poetry is filled with the idea of movement and progression. This theme is significant because it speaks to the universal human experience of growth and change. Oliver’s exploration of “the journey” allows readers to connect with her work on a personal level, as we all have our own journeys to navigate. Additionally, Oliver’s use of nature as a backdrop for these journeys highlights the interconnectedness of all living things and the importance of our relationship with the natural world. Overall, “the journey” is a central theme in Oliver’s body of work that speaks to the human experience and our place in the world.

The Universal Appeal of “The Journey”

“The Journey” by Mary Oliver is a poem that has captured the hearts of readers from all walks of life. Its universal appeal lies in its ability to speak to the human experience of transformation and growth. The poem’s central theme of embarking on a journey, both physical and emotional, resonates with readers who have faced challenges and overcome obstacles in their own lives. Oliver’s use of vivid imagery and metaphors creates a sense of familiarity and relatability, allowing readers to connect with the poem on a personal level. Whether it’s a journey of self-discovery, healing, or simply a physical journey, “The Journey” speaks to the human desire for growth and change. It is a timeless piece of literature that continues to inspire and move readers today.

Interpretation of the Final Lines of “The Journey”

The final lines of Mary Oliver’s poem “The Journey” are often interpreted as a call to action, a reminder to live life to the fullest and not waste time on fear or hesitation. The speaker urges the reader to “determine to do / the work for which you came” and to “save the only life you can.” This can be seen as a message of empowerment, encouraging the reader to take control of their own destiny and make the most of their time on earth. However, some readers may also interpret these lines as a warning against complacency and a reminder that life is fleeting. The phrase “save the only life you can” could be seen as a reminder to cherish every moment and not take anything for granted. Ultimately, the interpretation of these final lines will depend on the reader’s own experiences and perspective.

The Journey as a Metaphor for Life

The journey is a powerful metaphor for life, and Mary Oliver’s poem “The Journey” captures this idea beautifully. Just as we embark on a physical journey, we also embark on a journey through life, with all its ups and downs, twists and turns. Along the way, we encounter obstacles and challenges, but we also experience moments of joy and wonder. The journey is not always easy, but it is always worth it. Oliver’s poem reminds us that we must have the courage to take that first step, to leave behind what is safe and familiar, and to venture into the unknown. Only then can we discover the true beauty and meaning of our lives.

Exploring the Connection between “The Journey” and Transcendentalism

Transcendentalism is a philosophical movement that emerged in the 19th century in America. It emphasizes the importance of individualism, intuition, and the connection between humans and nature. Mary Oliver’s poem “The Journey” is a perfect example of transcendentalist literature. The poem is about a woman who decides to take a journey to find herself and her purpose in life. Throughout the poem, the woman encounters different obstacles and challenges, but she never gives up. She keeps moving forward, trusting her intuition and the universe to guide her. This is a perfect example of the transcendentalist belief in the power of the individual and the importance of following one’s own path. The poem also emphasizes the connection between humans and nature. The woman in the poem is constantly surrounded by nature, and she finds solace and guidance in it. This is another important aspect of transcendentalism, which emphasizes the importance of nature in human life. Overall, “The Journey” is a beautiful example of transcendentalist literature, and it shows how this philosophy can be applied to everyday life.

The Role of Religion and Spirituality in “The Journey”

Religion and spirituality play a significant role in Mary Oliver’s “The Journey.” The poem explores the idea of a spiritual journey, one that is not necessarily tied to any specific religion but rather a personal quest for meaning and purpose. The speaker in the poem is searching for a deeper understanding of herself and her place in the world, and she turns to a higher power for guidance and support. The use of religious imagery, such as the mention of a “dark night” and the idea of being “saved,” adds to the spiritual tone of the poem. Overall, “The Journey” highlights the importance of faith and spirituality in the human experience and the quest for self-discovery.

The Importance of Self-Discovery in “The Journey”

Self-discovery is a crucial element in any journey, and this is particularly true in “The Journey” by Mary Oliver. The poem tells the story of a woman who sets out on a journey to find herself, and in doing so, discovers the true meaning of life. Through her experiences, she learns to embrace her innermost desires and passions, and to let go of the things that hold her back. This process of self-discovery is not only important for the protagonist, but also for the reader, as it encourages us to reflect on our own lives and to consider what truly matters to us. Ultimately, “The Journey” reminds us that the path to self-discovery is not always easy, but it is always worth it.

Interesting Literature

A Summary and Analysis of Mary Oliver’s ‘The Journey’

By Dr Oliver Tearle (Loughborough University)

‘The Journey’ is a poem by the American poet Mary Oliver (1935-2019), a poet who has perhaps not received as much attention from critics as she deserves. It’s been estimated that she was the bestselling poet in the United States at the time of her death, so a few words of analysis about some of her best-known poems seem appropriate. ‘The Journey’ is a poem about someone who leaves behind their old life and embarks on a journey towards a new one.

The poem is about the day when someone (addressed as ‘you’ by the poem’s speaker) realised what they had to do, and started to do it, even though there were many people around them who were trying to dissuade the person from doing it.

It seemed that the whole house shook with the import of this person’s decision. Voices cried throughout their house, demanding that this person fix their lives for them. But that person, the person to whom the poem is addressed, didn’t stop doing what they had decided to do, and carried on nonetheless.

This person knew what they had to do, even though the wind seemed to try to uproot the very foundations of the person’s existence, like someone tearing a house from the ground. Many of the people who had demanded that the person addressed in the poem ‘mend’ their life for them experienced terrible sadness at the person’s decision.

It was already late, so the person knew they couldn’t delay any longer, and the road ahead was already strewn with obstacles. But gradually, as the person left the voices of those people behind them, they began to see the stars shining through the clouds, and a new voice – which they came to realise was their own – spoke reassuringly to the person as they made their way deeper into the world.

This person was determined to do the only thing they could: to save themselves.

How should be analyse, or categorise, ‘The Journey’? We could interpret this symbolic and open-ended poem as about a mid-life crisis (it is ‘already late’, remember: suggesting that the person addressed is not in the first flush of youth), and more specifically, as a poem about a woman, a wife and perhaps even a mother, leaving behind the selfish needs of others and seeking self-determination and, indeed, self-salvation.

We say ‘woman’ not just because the poet, Mary Oliver, was herself female and often wrote about women’s lives, including her own; but because those ‘voices’ which demand that the person in the poem ‘mend’ their lives are immediately interpreted, or decoded, in our minds as children’s voices (and perhaps a husband’s, too).

And yet perhaps it would be a mistake to limit the poem in such a way, and suggest it is about a dissatisfied wife and mother who has lost her sense of identity as she has put others first ahead of herself for many years. ‘Mother’, in particular, brings problems given the actions of the person in the poem (of which more below), but even identifying the person as a woman restricts its broader message.

And in this connection, it is worth noting that Oliver’s mode in this poem – having a genderless speaker address a genderless ‘you’ through use of the second-person mode of address – keeps us in the dark about the identities, and genders, of both speaker and addressee.

What we can say, however, is that there is every reason to think that speaker and addressee, whichever gender they might be, are the same person: the speaker is addressing herself, following her long journey towards self-discovery (or rediscovery). This analysis of the poem makes sense when we bear in mind the moment when the speaker tells us that this journeywoman (or man) stopped hearing the selfish voices of those she’d (or he’d) left behind and instead heard his (or her) own voice. The poem, then, is an extension of this dialogue: the journeyperson speaking to themselves following their journey (back) towards themselves.

In the last analysis, then, ‘The Journey’ is a poem about leaving one’s past behind and rediscovering one’s own self, who one really is. And yet if we assume that the speaker/addressee is an adult (in the middle of their life) and the voices they leave behind include those of their children, are we meant to embrace this, or wonder whether such an act of abnegation of one’s duties in the quest for self-discovery is a step too far?

Perhaps this is where assumptions about the figure in the poem turn on whether we see them as a frustrated parent walking out on their family duties or, for instance, someone who has merely quit their job and escaped form an oppressive relationship, breaking out on their own.

Put simply, then, ‘The Journey’ is a poem whose message, whilst clear enough, raises some interesting questions. Is it always right to give up on one’s responsibilities to others when we feel they are holding us back? Does it depend on whether they are literally dependent on us, or merely exploiting us, and refusing to give anything back (that one-way ‘mend my life!’ is revealing, certainly, and perhaps is easier to attribute to a selfish partner than to young children, whose lives don’t need ‘mending’ but rather shaping or directing).

‘The Journey’ comprises one single stanza composed in free verse . Oliver’s use of free verse – no regular rhyme scheme, rhythm or metre, and irregular line lengths – mirrors the journey undertaken by the person in the poem, who is uncertain where their quest of self-discovery will lead, and whose undertaking of such a journey is beset by initial doubts and obstacles.

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The Journey

By mary oliver.

Mary Oliver

One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice— though the whole house began to tremble and you felt the old tug at your ankles. "Mend my life!" each voice cried. But you didn't stop. You knew what you had to do, though the wind pried with its stiff fingers at the very foundations, though their melancholy was terrible. It was already late enough, and a wild night, and the road full of fallen branches and stones. But little by little, as you left their voices behind, the stars began to burn through the sheets of clouds, and there was a new voice which you slowly recognized as your own, that kept you company as you strode deeper and deeper into the world, determined to do the only thing you could do— determined to save the only life you could save.

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“For example, what the trees do not only in lightning storms or the watery dark of a summer’s n… or under the white nets of winter but now, and now, and now—whenever

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Every morning the world is created. Under the orange sticks of the sun

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Needing one, I invented her— the great-great-aunt dark as hicko… called Shining-Leaf, or Drifting… or The-Beauty-of-the-Night. Dear aunt, I’d call into the leav…

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Don’t bother me. I’ve just been born. The butterfly’s loping flight carries it through the country of…

She steps into the dark swamp where the long wait ends. The secret slippery package drops to the weeds. She leans her long neck and tongue…

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From a single grain they have mult… When you look in the eyes of one you have seen them all. At the edges of highways they pick at limp things.

Is the soul solid, like iron? Or is it tender and breakable, lik… the wings of a moth in the beak of… Who has it, and who doesn’t? I keep looking around me.

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In the early curtains of the dusk it flew, a slow galloping this way and that way

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On a summer morning I sat down on a hillside to think about God – a worthy pastime.

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You do not have to be good. You do not have to walk on your kn… for a hundred miles through the de… You only have to let the soft anim… love what it loves.

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Did you too see it, drifting, all… Did you see it in the morning, ris… An armful of white blossoms, A perfect commotion of silk and li… into the bondage of its wings; a s…

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Come with me into the field of sunflowers. Their faces are burnished disks, their dry spines creak like ship masts,

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Have you ever seen anything in your life more wonderful than the way the sun,

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Look, the trees are turning their own bodies into pillars of light,

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I’d seen their hoofprints in the deep needles and knew they ended the long night under the pines, walking

The Journey (Mary Oliver poem) Background

By mary oliver.

These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. We are thankful for their contributions and encourage you to make your own.

Written by people who wish to remain anonymous

"The Journey" was initially published in 2017 as a part of the final collection of poetry entitled Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver . "The Journey" is one of Oliver's most widely read and well-respected works; it is a significant part of this collection and her work as a whole.

Broadly, "The Journey" is a poem about transformation. It is a poem that talks about how someone's life can change once they dare to dream and once they dare to act. It is a poem that invites readers to do some self-reflection in their life and asks them to consider if they truly know who they are.

For Oliver, "The Journey" was a significant departure from some of her previous work, which was focused primarily on nature and the natural world. But "The Journey" still explores a number of very similar themes to her nature-focused work - primarily related to humans and the human condition.

Mary Oliver was one of the most celebrated American poets of the 20th and 21st centuries. She was also one of America's most widely-read poets. In 1984, Oliver was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, perhaps the most coveted prize an author could win. Then, in 1992, Oliver won the prestigious National Book Award.

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The Journey (Mary Oliver poem) Questions and Answers

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Study Guide for The Journey (Mary Oliver poem)

The Journey (Mary Oliver poem) study guide contains a biography of Mary Oliver, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

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Mary Oliver’s ‘The Journey’ is a Poem for Those Looking to Make a Change

posted on November 5, 2020

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            It’s important to take care of yourself on this journey called life. With work and social obligations eating up a lot of time, self-care and growth can fall to the wayside. When looking for inspiration to go in a different direction, poetry is an excellent place to turn.

            Mary Oliver’s ‘The Journey’ is a poem that makes you think. Known for writing about nature, this poem strays from the poet’s usual path. Most importantly, it makes you think about yourself. If you’re starting introspective journey for a new path, you have come to the right place. 

The Journey

One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice — though the whole house began to tremble and you felt the old tug at your ankles. “Mend my life!” each voice cried. But you didn’t stop. You knew what you had to do, though the wind pried with its stiff fingers at the very foundations, though their melancholy was terrible. It was already late enough, and a wild night, and the road full of fallen branches and stones. But little by little, as you left their voice behind, the stars began to burn through the sheets of clouds, and there was a new voice which you slowly recognized as your own, that kept you company as you strode deeper and deeper into the world, determined to do the only thing you could do — determined to save the only life that you could save.

              “The Journey” tells the story of someone on, well, a journey. They start at a turning point, where they know it is time to leave things behind to move forward on a new life path. The reader is not given a straight answer on where they are going, but they are led through the things that brought them to this decision.

            There is bad advice being given, and the person is being pressured to help those around them without any time for themselves. They have gotten to a point of no return, no going back. They know they need to move on and let go of the things in their life holding them back. Starting during the day, the story transitions into nightfall as they move further in the direction of their chosen path.

            Addressing the reader, the poem encourages them to be put into the shoes of the person in the poem. Going from day to night shows the progression of the decision they are making to remove the bad parts of their life to continue living without them.

            The poem ends on the note that they realize that they must take care of themselves first and foremost. Taking advice from others was not working, and the only way to move forward is to stop giving in to requests from others to fix their lives. An important story is being told here in a small amount of words.

            Running through the poem is a theme of darkness. This is seen with word choices such as ‘bad advice,’ ‘melancholy,’ etc. These are not words chosen to be light and fun. They show how weighed down the person is by those around them and that the feelings they are having are not great.

            While the entire poem is a metaphor for life being a journey and the end is positive, even the language of “save the only life that you could,” indicates a darkness in the world around them. Are everyone’s lives in danger? These metaphors can be applied to life now amid a pandemic with uncertainty at every turn. The perspective one may have had probably changed drastically as the world did.

            Instead of being completely general, this poem also focuses on one individual person, and the reader can put themselves in their shoes. The person is struggling with a relatable issue that many people face, which is bad relationships and memories. At the risk of sounding hokey, the theme of this poem is a journey.

            Mary Oliver’s poems usually focus on the world of nature and spirituality. While this one addresses the reader and brings attention to the human component, she still incorporates nature with the wind and other symbolism.       

            Upon reading the first lines, you know this is going to be good. Just like you, the person being written about knows it is time to make changes. A turning point is here, and a new path will be formed. The people around them are giving them advice that just won’t do, and they need to break free and move forward.

            The house mentioned in line 6 symbolizes the person in question trembling beneath the words of others telling them what to do, and how that advice isn’t necessarily good. The relationships people have can be draining at times, and the weight of others asking for help with their own lives can deter people from working on themselves. The voices in the poem are yelling “Mend my life!” which is a common request in other words from others. When you care about someone, it can be difficult to deny them the emotional energy they demand.

            The line “you knew what you had to do,” cements that they know it is time to leave all of the badness behind and take control of their own life again. Cutting ties and leaving those behind who aren’t good for you is an incredibly hard task. Once the decision is made, sticking with it is the part that people struggle with the most. Another interpretation here is letting go not of people and relationships, but of a bad past memory that has been holding you back.

            One of the hardest things to do in relationships of any kind is to say the dreaded word, “no.” The person in this poem is making the tough decision to deny the requests of those around them, and push the bad advice back. The wind mentioned in line 14 symbolizes the pressure and stress caused by the nagging words of others that is holding them back. Working to get through it, they escape the grips to continue working to get rid of the weight.

            The symbolism continues with the stars breaking through the clouds, where the person is reaching clarity. By the end of the poem, it is nightfall, symbolizing the change getting further away from the issues they are escaping. The road is full of branches and stones that they are leaving behind, as well. The stones and branches could symbolize the people and memories they are trying to forget, left behind on the road to blow away and not return. When letting go of people and memories, getting rid of physical memories is one of the first steps in release.

            As the cloud disappear and clarity is reached, they are seeing their new life in front of them. The night and day symbolism is a clear way to distinguish the progression in their choices. Without being drowned out by the sound of other voices, they are able to hear their own voice and think. The line “as you left their voice behind, the stars began to burn,” symbolizes clarity coming as they stop listening to the voices.

            While it may not be actual physical distance between them and the memories, the visual of a road leading away from them shows the growth and change. It isn’t always possible to get that physical distance, but the imagery is something you can see in your head to help you move on. Latching onto the past can hinder any forward movement, so letting go in some regard will help, and this poem shows that.

            The ending line of being determined to do the only thing that you could do, is save the only life that you could, implying their own life. This is a very important moment as the poem ends. They have finished their realization period and have gotten to the point of leaving it behind to start new.

            The reader is left to hope they work on themselves and reach the goals they have set. It is open for interpretation how they do this, but the why is made clear throughout. The story can be applied to any aspect of life, and be inspiration for someone to do the same.

Structure/Rhyme Scheme

            ‘The Journey’ is a free verse poem that does not have your standard rhyme scheme. While rhyming does occur in some lines, it isn’t consistent throughout. One standout rhyme is the first line: “One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voice around you,” do and you rhyme, but again it is not consistent in the entire poem. Being written with the word “you,” addresses the reader to help them read the poem as it it’s about themselves.

            As far as time goes, the poem follows the line of one day, but a day after much consideration. Earlier the term ‘turning point’ was used, and that’s where this poem begins. The person has been thinking about letting go for a while, and it is finally time. The reader is joining them right as they have made the final decision and it is time for them to move on with their life. Where were they before? The reader doesn’t have to know. This decision is so relatable in so many ways.

            The structure and “you” approach make this a relatable poem and easy to read. The words used are simple and get the point across without being too wordy. The quotation of “mend my life!” is something everyone has heard at least once in some form. The writing makes this an accessible poem for those who may find the entire world of poetry to be daunting.

            Overall, ‘The Journey’ is a poem that almost anyone can relate to. Who hasn’t been in a position where they had to cut someone out, or knew it was time to change their lifestyle? There are no specifics tied to the reasons why this person is choosing to take the journey, so the reader can fill in the blanks with people or situations from their own lives.

            For the world’s current timeline, many people are choosing to make changes in their life. The time of isolation experienced globally was a time for introspect. This poem does an excellent job of encompassing that feeling of wanting to decide, getting to the point where you know it’s the right one, and needing to do it at that exact moment. If you wait too long, you may not follow through, and that’s why you must act at that second.

            Poetry is a place to seek inspiration and enjoyment. A poem like this can inspire you to think about yourself and what you have going on in your life. Through symbolism and interpretation, the reader can take the good out of the poem to apply to their own situation. That makes it a great poem.

            A simple takeaway from this poem is to make time for yourself. It is perfectly fine to say no to someone, and if something isn’t good for you, get it out of your life.  Now is as good a time as any to make changes to redirect the course of your life. Whether that be leaving memories behind, or people that just aren’t good for you.

            Bringing yourself to the turning point is a journey in itself, and once you get there crossing the bridge is even harder. Hopefully this poem inspires you to pinpoint what it is holding you back, and let it go. Life is all about journeys and changes, and the important part is coming to terms with this.           

            To sum it up, there’s nothing like a poem involving the reader to get your mind moving. Whether this poem encourages you to make major life changes, or think about things a little differently, it has something for everyone.

Lifesaving Poems

Essential poems for hard times

Lifesaving Poems: Mary Oliver’s ‘The Journey’

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The Journey

One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice– though the whole house began to tremble and you felt the old tug at your ankles. ‘Mend my life!’ each voice cried. But you didn’t stop. You knew what you had to do, though the wind pried with its stiff fingers at the very foundations, though their melancholy was terrible. It was already late enough, and a wild night, and the road full of fallen branches and stones. But little by little, as you left their voices behind, the stars began to burn through the sheets of clouds, and there was a new voice which you slowly recognised as your own, that kept you company as you strode deeper and deeper into the world, determined to do the only thing you could do– determined to save the only life you could save.

Mary Oliver

If there is one theme I keep going back to in these Lifesaving Poems posts, it is this: behind every discovery of every single poem in the list there is a person who nudged it forward, often directly, sometimes invisibly, frequently without knowing it, towards me. From friends , fellow poets and teachers , to sitting in a car park waiting for a poetry workshop, or driving to one , I feel the luckiest of people to have had such great mentors.

This is no less true of my discovery, some three or so years ago, of Mary Oliver’s poetry. Now, I realise, as with my discovery of Billy Collins , that I was pretty much the last person I know to come to this particular party. Until I found this marvellous blog post by my old friend Malcolm Doney I had kind of felt Oliver’s searching and tough-delicate poems kind of bouncing off me a little. I am not proud of it; but it is true.

I loved Malcolm’s telling of the story of Russell Brand grilling on Newsnight ,  in the wake of the fallout from his prank call, with Jonathan Ross, to Andrew Sachs. I never saw the programme in question but feel as though I have. Brand stated that there are two Russell Brands, the one people go to see and hear, expecting something miraculous, and the idiot who makes prank phone calls. He confessed to making the same mistake himself, thinking he was phoning up Manuel from Fawlty Towers, not somebody’s grandfather. He believed in the icon, not the man.

Not least among the pleasures of reading Malcolm’s piece, therefore, was the physical sensation of feeling my preconceived ideas about Brand being turned on their head. From the sound of it, this is what Jeremy Paxman went through as well.

Paxman concluded the programme with this reflection, that there was important terrain for us to explore between “external validation and internal validation”: ‘a matter in essence, of finding yourself, beyond other people’s expectations’ as Malcolm so eloquently put it. At that point Malcolm’s piece stops; he lets Mary Oliver do the talking instead. Her poem is a life lesson I can never learn too often.

If you liked this post, why not try Rose Cook’s ‘Poem for someone who is juggling her life’  or Denise Levertov’s ‘The Secret’

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Published by Anthony Wilson

I am a lecturer, poet and writing tutor. I work in teacher and medical education at the University of Exeter. My anthology Lifesaving Poems was published by Bloodaxe Books in 2015. In 2012 I published Riddance (Worple Press), a collection of poems, and Love for Now (Impress Books), a memoir, about my experience of cancer. The Wind and the Rain, my sixth collection of poems, is available now from Blue Diode Publishing. My current research project, funded by the Foyle Foundation, is Young Poets' Stories: https://youngpoetsstories.com/. This blog is archived by the British Library. View all posts by Anthony Wilson

20 Comments

This is a classic poem with such an enduring message. Great to see it on your list, Anthony. I also love Oliver’s book length poem ‘The Leaf and the Cloud’, a hymn to nature and writing.

Thanks so much for this recommendation Rionach. I did not know this one and it’s now on my list. As ever with many thanks for your kind comment Anthony

I loved this. I have shared your feeling (your pre Doney feeling) about Mary Oliver actually – with a couple of exceptions. But this poem, which somehow I have never met before — quite something! I read it aloud to my partner and when I got two thirds of the way through burst into tears. Best quality tears.

Hi Nell. I am so pleased you saw this. And also relieved to know it is not just me with that reaction. I don’t know how I avoided knowing about this ‘classic’ until so recently, but there you go. Like you, it completely floored me when I first read it. As ever with many thanks for your comments Anthony

This is one of the first poems of Mary Oliver’s I came across and it spoke to me in a way that only poems can – it got right to the core of things. I love the gentle nature of her poetry, with flashes of savagery – quite at one with nature itself. I would be interested in your view of Rules for the Dance as I think it is not so much rules as an uncovering of the underlying structure of poetry in quite a fluid way and I enjoyed it much more than the Stephen Fry which I have just started and which seems much more dense and offputting.

And I absolutely know what your friend meant in his post about public personas and what Russell Brand was talking about with Andrew Sachs. I went to see a well known TV show filmed just before Christmas and was shocked by how much I felt I knew the dancers in it, and caught myself smiling at them as if they’d recognise me too!

Oh – and i saw the recent Russell Brand interview and saw how he absolutely refused to capitulate to the grilling from Paxman, while simultaneously playing with Paxman’s preconceptions of him. Fascinating as both parties were very strong and, while Brand ‘won’ he also ended up having words put in his mouth (revolution!) by Paxman. Each was ‘writing’ the other. Worth a watch.

Thank you so much for your wonderful comment. I admit to not having read The Rules for the Dance -but maybe now I will. Your comment reminds me of a comment Seamus Heaney once made about sonnets, something along the lines of them being about age and sex and death and the ‘dance within yourself’. I have not read all the Fry. I admit to not getting on with it at all, putting it down in the bookshop in a huff. I’m pleased you caught up with the Paxman pieces. Leaving aside Brands branding of himself, the curious tone of derision, in both their voices, for each other, is never far from the surface. As ever with grateful thanks and good wishes Anthony

‘The dance within yourself’…yes – that’s it! What a great line. I saw your post on the note you got from Seamus Heaney – I’m not surprised you treasure it. 🙂

Derision, yes. There was a curious tone…you’re right – I think curious because there was an undertow of grudging respect – they were circling and ‘dancing’ like the bullfighter and the bull! But also that overwhelming sense of irony that they were having these conversations at all, perhaps?

It is hard to get away from what Stephen Ball has called the discourse of derision, in all aspects of public debate in our country. That is why sane and kind voices like Heaney’s are still so vital to me, and why I need to remind myself to keep returning to them. As ever with thanks Anthony

What is the tone of the Journey?

You tell me. For me it is intimate, personal, a whisper. As ever with good wishes Anthony

This is one of my favorite’s, as is David Whyte’s poem of the same name.

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Hello Anthony Beginning, dozy poet here whose first brush with Mary Oliver is reading this poem now. Everything about it said “YES!” to me. The recognition of the truth of it made me smile. I don’t always connect with poems but I did this one. Thank you so much for opening the door.

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Nice post! Love Oliver’s poem, “Wild Geese.” http://peacefulrivers.homestead.com/maryoliver.html#anchor_14792

On the day I delete my Facebook account in order to halt my addiction to what other peopl are saying and reporting, advising and telling, I discover this perfect-for-me poem. What a delight.

So pleased the timing was good for you Madeleine. Hang in there!

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Journey of the Magi Summary & Analysis by T. S. Eliot

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the journey theme

"Journey of the Magi" is a poem by T.S. Eliot, first published in 1927 in a series of pamphlets related to Christmas. The poem was written shortly after Eliot's conversion to the Anglican faith. Accordingly, though the poem is an allegorical dramatic monologue that inhabits the voice of one the magi (the three wise men who visit the infant Jesus), it's also generally considered to be a deeply personal poem. Indeed, the magus in the poem shares Eliot's view that spiritual transformation is not a comfort, but an ongoing process—an arduous journey seemingly without end. The magus's view on the birth of Jesus—and the shift from the old ways to Christianity—is complex and ambivalent.

  • Read the full text of “Journey of the Magi”

the journey theme

The Full Text of “Journey of the Magi”

“journey of the magi” summary, “journey of the magi” themes.

Theme Spiritual Death and Rebirth

Spiritual Death and Rebirth

Line-by-line explanation & analysis of “journey of the magi”.

'A cold coming ... ... dead of winter.'

the journey theme

And the camels ... ... girls bringing sherbet.

Lines 11-16

Then the camel ... ... had of it.

Lines 17-20

At the end ... ... was all folly.

Lines 21-25

Then at dawn ... ... in the meadow.

Lines 26-31

Then we came ... ... might say) satisfactory.

Lines 32-36

All this was ... ... Birth or Death?

Lines 36-39

There was a ... ... Death, our death.

Lines 40-43

We returned to ... ... of another death.

“Journey of the Magi” Symbols

Symbol Biblical Imagery

Biblical Imagery

  • Line 23: “running stream”
  • Line 24: “three trees on the low sky”
  • Line 25: “an old white horse”
  • Line 26: “vine-leaves”
  • Line 27: “pieces of silver”
  • Line 28: “empty wine-skins”

“Journey of the Magi” Poetic Devices & Figurative Language

Alliteration.

  • Line 1: “cold coming”
  • Line 4: “ways,” “deep,” “weather”
  • Line 5: “dead,” “winter”
  • Line 9: “summer,” “slopes”
  • Line 10: “silken”
  • Line 11: “camel,” “cursing”
  • Line 12: “wanting,” “women”
  • Line 18: “Sleeping,” “snatches”
  • Line 19: “singing,” “saying”
  • Line 20: “That this”
  • Line 21: “dawn,” “down,” “valley”
  • Line 22: “snow,” “smelling,” “vegetation”
  • Line 27: “Six,” “door dicing,” “silver”
  • Line 31: “say) satisfactory.”
  • Line 35: “were we,” “way”
  • Line 37: “doubt,” “death”
  • Line 38: “But,” “different,” “Birth”
  • Line 39: “bitter,” “Death,” “death”
  • Line 42: “gods”
  • Line 43: “glad”
  • Lines 1-5: “'A cold coming we had of it, / Just the worst time of the year / For a journey, and such a long journey: / The ways deep and the weather sharp, / The very dead of winter.'”
  • Lines 17-20: “At the end we preferred to travel all night, / Sleeping in snatches, / With the voices singing in our ears, saying / That this was all folly.”
  • Line 4: “The,” “the weather”
  • Line 5: “The very dead”
  • Line 6: “And,” “camels,” “sore,” “refractory”
  • Line 9: “The summer palaces,” “the terraces”
  • Line 10: “the silken,” “bringing sherbet”
  • Line 11: “Then,” “men,” “grumbling”
  • Line 12: “running,” “liquor,” “women”
  • Line 13: “n,” “ight-fires”
  • Line 15: “high prices”
  • Line 16: “time”
  • Line 18: “Sleeping in”
  • Line 19: “With,” “singing in,” “saying”
  • Line 20: “this,” “all folly”
  • Line 22: “below,” “snow,” “smelling,” “vegetation”
  • Line 23: “stream,” “beating”
  • Line 24: “three trees,” “low”
  • Line 25: “And an,” “ old,” “meadow”
  • Line 26: “vine”
  • Line 27: “dicing”
  • Line 28: “wine”
  • Line 29: “no information,” “so”
  • Line 30: “too soon”
  • Line 31: “place,” “you,” “say”
  • Line 41: “ease”
  • Line 42: “people”
  • Line 3: “journey, and”
  • Line 6: “galled, sore-footed, refractory”
  • Line 9: “slopes, the”
  • Line 12: “away, and”
  • Line 13: “out, and”
  • Line 19: “ears, saying”
  • Line 22: “Wet, below,” “line, smelling”
  • Line 29: “information, and”
  • Line 30: “evening, not”
  • Line 31: “place; it”
  • Line 32: “ago, I”
  • Line 33: “again, but”
  • Line 35: “This: were”
  • Line 36: “Death? There”
  • Line 37: “doubt. I”
  • Line 38: “different; this”
  • Line 39: “us, like Death, our”
  • Line 40: “places, these”
  • Line 41: “here, in”
  • Line 2: “Just,” “ worst”
  • Line 4: “ways deep,” “the weather sharp,”
  • Line 7: “Lying down in,” “melting snow”
  • Line 8: “There were,” “ times ,” “we regretted”
  • Lines 9-10: “The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, / And the silken girls bringing sherbet.”
  • Lines 11-12: “Then the camel men cursing and grumbling / and running away, and wanting their liquor and women,”
  • Line 13: “night,” “-fires,” “out,” “shelters”
  • Line 14: “cities hostile,” “towns”
  • Line 15: “villages dirty ,” “high,” “ prices”
  • Line 16: “hard,” “had”
  • Line 17: “travel all”
  • Line 18: “Sleeping in snatches”
  • Line 19: “With the voices singing,” “our ears, saying”
  • Line 20: “That this was all folly”
  • Lines 21-25: “Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, / Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation; / With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, / And three trees on the low sky, / And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow.”
  • Line 32: “All,” “long”
  • Lines 33-35: “set down / This set down / This”
  • Line 35: “were we led all,” “way”
  • Line 37: “evidence,” “doubt,” “death”
  • Line 38: “different,” “Birth”
  • Line 39: “Hard,” “bitter,” “Death,” “death”
  • Line 42: “alien people,” “gods”
  • Line 43: “glad,” “death”

Polysyndeton

  • Line 11: “and”
  • Line 12: “and,” “and,” “and”
  • Line 13: “And,” “and”
  • Line 14: “And,” “and”
  • Line 15: “And,” “and”
  • Line 23: “and”
  • Line 24: “And”
  • Line 25: “And”
  • Line 3: “journey,” “journey”
  • Line 36: “Birth or Death,” “Birth”
  • Line 37: “ birth and death,”
  • Line 38: “Birth”
  • Line 39: “ Death, our death”
  • Line 43: “death”

Rhetorical Question

  • Lines 35-36: “were we led all that way for / Birth or Death?”
  • Lines 4-5: “The ways deep and the weather sharp, / The very dead of winter.'”
  • Lines 11-16: “Then the camel men cursing and grumbling / and running away, and wanting their liquor and women, / And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, / And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly / And the villages dirty and charging high prices: / A hard time we had of it.”
  • Line 22: “Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation;”
  • Lines 24-25: “And three trees on the low sky, / And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow.”

“Journey of the Magi” Vocabulary

Select any word below to get its definition in the context of the poem. The words are listed in the order in which they appear in the poem.

  • The Old Dispensation
  • (Location in poem: )

Form, Meter, & Rhyme Scheme of “Journey of the Magi”

Rhyme scheme, “journey of the magi” speaker, “journey of the magi” setting, literary and historical context of “journey of the magi”, more “journey of the magi” resources, external resources.

Eliot's Reading — The poem read by its author. 

Lancelot Andrewes's Sermon — The 1622 Christmas sermon of the British bishop Lancelot Andrewes, which Eliot adapted for the poem's opening. 

A Documentary on the Poet — A BBC production about Eliot's life and work. 

Eliot and Christianity — An article exploring Eliot's relationship with his religion.

More Poems and Eliot's Biography — A valuable resource on Eliot's life and work from the Poetry Foundation.  

LitCharts on Other Poems by T. S. Eliot

Four Quartets: Burnt Norton

La Figlia Che Piange

Morning at the Window

Portrait of a Lady

Rhapsody on a Windy Night

The Hollow Men

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The Waste Land

Ask LitCharts AI: The answer to your questions

The LitCharts.com logo.

Worlds of Words

International collection of children’s and adolescent literature, mtyt: the journey.

The Journey by Francesca Sanna is a picturebook about a family’s journey of refuge after their country is unsafe after war. The family bonds are powerful in both the illustrations and the words. This book discusses refugee struggles and what happens to families that are refugees. It also provides conversation about how to help refugees in America today.

Jessica: This breath-taking, meaningful story is about a family that leaves their home. After their town is struck with war and it takes their father’s life, their mother hears of a faraway country where many travel to for safety and decides that they will also leave. What begins as a family adventure turns into escape, then survival.

The illustrations and storyline work to show the physical, mental and emotional toll on refugees similar to this family. The author shows a happy time, before the war, when all members are present and enjoy a family tradition. Although darkness is present in this scene, the family is unaware of it.

The war, as a dark creature, chases the family from their happy moment and throughout their entire journey. One part of this family’s story in The Journey is the continuous appearance of new challenges. As soon as the family reaches safety, another task presents itself. After the family gets over the wall, they must board a boat. Once the family finally reaches land, they must board a train. We don’t see the family reach their final destination, which shows that a refugee’s journey may never end.

Although the family finds temporary refuge along their journey, they never feel safe. When the mother shows her children pictures of their destination, the pictures surround them and make them feel safe. This feeling of safety is never shown again.

As the family reaches the wall, there is a powerful guard that tells them to leave. The guard’s size represents his power as he towers over the small family. My biggest emotional connection is when the family sleeps in the forest outside the wall because there is nowhere else to go. It is difficult to see a mother hold her two children tightly among the wild plants, but it is harder to see the mother weep as her children finally fall asleep peacefully.

I also find it interesting when they receive help over the wall. Their helper is such a negative, scary image. You expect the person who helps them to be pleasant. Perhaps this is a warning. Negative experiences can happen, so the reader still understands that to accept help is a risk.

The Journey ‘s simple story that is easy for younger readers makes it an excellent addition to classrooms. Its metaphorical illustrations also encourage deeper, critical thinking in older audiences. This book offers the reader as much meaning as they take away from it. The story begins with a happy moment, then shows darkness that breeds struggle until we leave our characters in a hopeful situation. There are positive and negative stories about how today’s refugees end their journeys. Therefore, it works well that this book doesn’t show the end. The book closes with the symbolism of birds; it is sad, but also gives the boy hope for the future.

Janelle: The creator of The Journey shares the origin story of two sisters she met in a refugee center in Italy. Francesca Sanna collected other refugee stories, and with her own illustrative talents created what she says is a collage of the personal journeys of these people.

The end pages are images of what the book holds. The illustrative techniques of color, placement, symbolism and metaphoric images are powerful in telling this synthesis of stories. The text is simple, but behind the simplicity are stories told by the art. These are stories of loss, fear, challenges, physical journeys and hope.

Parts of The Journey story are not new to me as a reader, but Sanna’s art engages one in new ways. I relate to the happy family on the first page that play at the beach, although the dark ocean waters on the far right predict not-so-happy times ahead. The next page shows the claws of war destroy the town they love and eventually take the father. Happier times contrast war and the troubling journey. While there is hope, its strangeness is still prominent in the child narrator and the dangers prominent in the mother’s actions and appearance.

The family begins with belongings that they cherish, but “the further we go, the more we leave behind,” and by the end have only memories. Both in literature and the news there are ongoing journeys that seem endless and even impossible when they are refused the right to cross borders. While not all refugee journeys are such a combination of challenges, the average reader and citizen of the US does not often hear the whole story, even those who care enough to read and inquire.

Sanna’s unique artistic style reflects the emotions of this story in the concluding feeling of hope shared of the narrator, who observes the migrating birds. As with Flight , the search for a new home is not resolved. There is hope for the family, but I wonder what I can do for real families in our country that hope to find a safe home. I hope that young readers realize the difficulties and strength of those who do make it. I hope they are sensitive when discussing the refugee situation within the global community.

Title: The Journey Author: Francesca Sanna Publisher: Flying Eye Books ISBN: 9781909263994 Date Published: September 13 2016

This is the fourth installment of November 2017’s My Take/Your Take. To follow these continuing conversations,  check back every Wednesday .

  • Themes : francesca sanna , Janelle Mathis , jessica edwards , Journey
  • Descriptors: Books & Resources , My Take/Your Take

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the journey theme

Every BTS song released by members in 2024 (so far)

B TS songs are known for their catchy tunes and meaningful lyrics, touching on themes such as mental health, fame, youth issues, and the journey towards self-love. Their genuine music has earned them a massive fanbase, making them one of the most popular boy groups in history.

In 2024, the members released solo songs, offering fans unique perspectives from each member.

This article explores songs released by BTS members in 2024.

  • FRI(END)S by V
  • Hope on the Street Vol.1 by J-hope
  • Come Back To Me by RM
  • Never Let Go by Jungkook
  • Smeraldo Garden Marching Band by Jimin ft Loco

1. FRI(END)S by V

On March 15, 2024, BTS V released the single, FRI(END)S , which was co-written by Riley, Connor McDonough, Ori Jose, Melanie Joy, Joel Castillo, Salem Ilese, and Michel Schulz.

The BTS song, produced by Riley McDonough and Conor McDonough, talks about the complex friendship between two individuals, in which the guy feels the relationship has grown into something more intense than just a platonic one, and deals with the urge to confess his love to the girl.

FRI(END)S features a blend of pop with R&B that can be felt in its soft rhythm and melody.

The hit track debuted on Spotify with 4,728,233 streams.

2. Hope on the Street Vol.1 by J-hope

Hope on the Street Vol.1 is BTS J-hope's debut EP, which was released on March 29, 2024. This mini album is composed of 6 tracks including On the street, I wonder ft Jungkook, Lock/ Unlock with Nile Rodgers and Benny Blanco , I don't know with Huh Yun-jin Le , What if, and Neuron with Yoon Mi-rae and Gaeko.

The EP also features producers like Pdogg, Benny Blanco, Nile Rodgers and others. The mini album was inspired by J-hope's dance history and was named after J-hope's dance crew in middle school.

The mini album surpassed 160 million streams on Spotify on June 28, 2024.

3. Come Back To Me by RM

Come Back To Me is the lead track off RM's sophomore studio album, Right Place, Wrong Person . The Indie pop song was released on May 10, 2024, under Big Hit Music.

Come Back to Me was written by RM, JNKYRD, Oh Hyuk, San Yawn, and Kuo, and produced by Oh Hyuk. The lyrics focus on love, self-discovery, and societal pressures that lead to feeling left out. Upon release, the BTS song peaked at number 23 on Spotify's global chart, with over 3 million streams.

4. Lost by RM

RM of BTS released the track, Lost , from his highly anticipated album, Right Place, Wrong Person , on May 24, 2024. The song depicts the feeling of being lost or in a state of confusion even when things seem to be going well as planned.

The song was written and produced by RM himself, Kim Hanjoo, Jclef, Nancy Boy, JNKYRD, San Yawn, Kim Isle, Unsinkable, and Marldn. Lost , is a cross-genre song that features elements of pop, R&B, and post-punk.

The BTS song debuted at number 28 on the Spotify Global chart with 3,230,889 streams.

5. Never Let Go by Jungkook

Never Let Go was released by BTS Jungkook, in commemoration of the eleventh BTS anniversary. The single dropped on June 7, 2024, featuring a host of writers including Jungkook himself, Anton Martin Mendo, Melanie Joy Fontana, and Jess Bluu, amongst others.

In June, BTS member JungKook released his second single as a soloist, co-produced by Sim Fane, Bak, Outtatown, and Star Boy. The K-pop song's lyrics focus on appreciation, with JungKook expressing heartfelt gratitude to the Army and urging them to maintain their trust and faith in BTS. As of June 29, 2024, the BTS song had accumulated 70 million streams on Spotify.

6. Smeraldo Garden Marching Band by Jimin ft Loco

Smeraldo Garden Marching Band ft the K-pop rapper, Loco, is Jimin's latest solo single from his forthcoming seven-track album, Muse . The song was written by Jimin in collaboration with TBHits, Pdogg, and Loco, amongst others.

The pre-release track dropped on June 28, 2024, and revolves around themes of confession. The song is inspired by the fictional flower from the Bangtan universe and is intended to convey appreciation to the ARMY fandom.

The track also draws inspiration from the Beatles' album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club . The BTS song debuted at number 4 on Spotify Global with 6,625,387 streams.

The BTS songs were released to record-breaking debut streams on Spotify and other streaming platforms. Muse, the second solo album by BTS Jimin is expected to drop on July 19, 2024.

Every BTS song released by members in 2024 (so far)

the journey theme

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Season 31: Season of the Forbidden Archives – Has Concluded

Season 31: Season of the Forbidden Archives – Has Concluded

Sanctuary needs you to answer its call for aid in Season 31: Season of the Forbidden Archives. Starting on April 12 at 5 p.m. PDT/CET/KST , Nephalem can harness the power of Forbidden Archives theme, which first debuted with Season 20. For an in-depth look into what’s coming, read below.

the journey theme

Seasonal Journey

Season theme.

Season Cosmetic Rewards

Season Journey Rewards

Seasonal conquest, haedrig’s gift.

Patch 2.7.7 Notes

Season 31 is the Season of the Forbidden Archives. Many adventurers have come to learn the power that dwells within the ancient nephalem artifact, Kanai’s Cube. However, none understands this power better than the equally celebrated and reviled Horadrim, Zoltun Kulle. Kulle was able to unlock and harness the power of the Cube like none before, leveraging its power to siphon and archive the energies of powerful items. With Season 31, we explore the power Kulle might lend to your fingertips if his experiments went unchecked.

For the duration of Season 31, the slots in Kanai’s Cube that allow you to equip three additional Legendary powers will not be restricted to their usual categories. While normally a player can equip one power each from the Weapon, Armor, and Jewelry categories, Season 31 players can mix and match between all three! This might allow you to run two Weapon powers with one Armor power. Or perhaps you might choose to run three Amulet powers instead. The choice is yours, and we’re as eager as you are to experiment with the new build opportunities this creates!

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Season 31 Cosmetic Rewards

Beginning with Season 17, we began re-introducing previous Seasonal rewards to make them available to players who may have missed them the first time around. For Season 31, this means awards originally available from Season 7 are returning to the Season Journey.

the journey theme

However, we know it’s nice to have something new to aim for if you’ve participated in previous Seasons. We’re bringing back End of Journey rewards as introduced in Season 17, with not one, but two new cosmetic rewards for those who complete the entirety of the Season journey. Feast your eyes upon the Valor Portrait Frame and Angelic Treasure Goblin pet !

In addition to the Helm and Shoulders slots of the exclusive Conqueror Set, you’ll be able to earn a series of portrait frames that embody the snowy, foreboding aura of the Eternal Woods. If you need a warm little pal to keep you cozy through your cold journeys, the Dream of Piers fiery nature should do the trick—when he’s not instilling night terrors in the local fauna.

If you’ve been diligently slaying demons for the past few Seasons and reached Conqueror in the Season Journey each time, you’ve surely accrued a few extra stash tabs. You’ll earn one additional tab each Season by finishing the Conqueror tier, up to a maximum of five :

  • Guardian of Sanctuary: Finish a level 70 Nephalem Rift on Torment XIII within five minutes.
  • Gem of My Life: Level three Legendary Gems to level 55.
  • All I Do IS Win: Complete two Conquests this Season.
  • Kill You: Kill Ghom at level 70 in under 30 seconds on Torment XIII difficulty.
  • Money Ain’t A Thang: Slay Greed on Torment XIII difficulty.
  • Take U There: Reach Greater Rift level 60 Solo.
  • Power Amplification: Use Kanai’s Cube to augment an Ancient Legendary item with a level 50+ gem.
  • Cubic Reconfiguration: Use Kanai’s Cube to reforge a Legendary item.

Want to prepare your Conquest plan for Season 31? Here are the challenges you’ll face! Returning for Season 31 is Sprinter/Speed Racer , where you’re challenged to complete the entire Diablo III campaign from Act I to Act V at level 70 in under 1 hour! Next is Avarice/Avaritia , where all that glitters is gold—that is, if you can complete a 50 million gold streak outside of The Vault or its Inner Sanctum. On a Good Day/I Can’t Stop encourages you to upgrade your Legendary Gems; level three Legendary Gems to 65 to complete this challenge! Push your way to Greater Rift level 75 to complete Divinity/Lionhearted. Lastly, a fan-favorite for those who enjoy unconventional builds, The Thrill/Superhuman requires completion of a Greater Rift level 45—solo and without any Set items equipped.

Finally, the Class Sets rewarded for completing certain chapters in the Season Journey courtesy of Haedrig’s Gift have rotated once more. We’ve listed the available Sets below. For those new to Seasons, here’s how it works:

Completing Chapters 2, 3, and 4 of the Season Journey will reward you with three of Haedrig’s Gifts. Each Gift contains a few pieces from one of your Class Sets. Players can only unlock one Class Set in this manner per Season across Hardcore and Non-Hardcore, so choose wisely!

The set you receive depends on the class of the character you’re playing when you open each Haedrig’s Gift. To collect a full Class Set, you’ll need to open all three on the same character.

Here are the sets granted by Haedrig’s Gift in Season 31:

  • Barbarian – Wrath of the Wastes
  • Crusader – Roland’s Legacy
  • Demon Hunter – Unhallowed Essence
  • Monk – Raiment of a Thousand Storms
  • Necromancer – Bones of Rathma
  • Witch Doctor – Helltooth Harness
  • Wizard – Tal Rasha’s Elements

the journey theme

Patch 2.7.7 | Game Updates

  • Updated Logos for KR Age Restriction from 18 years of age to 19 years of age.
  • Extra progress orb drops from the Soulshard Stain of Sin now works for Challenge Rifts.
  • Extra progress orb drops from the Soulshard Stain of Sin and Altar of Rites node Reaper now only drops from monsters inside Nephalem Rifts, Greater Nephalem Rifts, and Challenge Rifts.

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  • The Captain leads the crew by making strategic and story decisions, scanning for intel, and interacting with other vessels.
  • The Pilot maneuvers through dangers, utilizing cloaking to outsmart enemies and wormholes to flee entirely.
  • The Gunner commands the ship’s impressive arsenal, from color-dependent lasers to an array of different missile types.
  • The Engineer manages power distribution, repairs, and shields to keep the ship in one piece amid enemy assaults.

Key Features:

  • Dynamic Co-op Gameplay : Built from the ground up for four players, collaboration isn’t just encouraged - it’s essential to your crew’s survival.
  • Roguelike Story : Every run is unique, with 22 potential missions and a narrative influenced by your choices in a mysterious time loop where your memories of previous runs remain.
  • Diverse Enemies : Face distinct alien races, each with unique tactics and technology, compelling your crew to continually adapt and strategize.
  • Failure is Always an Option : Is your spaceship about to explode? You can always flee instead, and the story will continue with consequences of your retreat.
  • Community and Support : Join our dedicated Discord to find crewmates and dive deeper into the game's community.

Mature Content Description

The developers describe the content like this:

Into the M.A.W. includes ship-to-ship combat and violence, though without graphic gore. Players can also expect strong language and creative swearing throughout the game.

System Requirements

  • OS: Windows 10
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-8400 or AMD Ryzen 3 3300x
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 or AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT
  • DirectX: Version 10
  • Network: Broadband Internet connection
  • Storage: 10 GB available space
  • Sound Card: Windows Compatible Audio Device
  • OS: Windows 11
  • Processor: Intel Core i7-3770K Quad Core CPU or better / AMD FX 4350 Quad Core CPU or better
  • Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX 2080 or AMD RX Radeon RX 6700
  • DirectX: Version 11

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COMMENTS

  1. The Journey by Mary Oliver

    Themes. Due to the deeply metaphorical nature of 'The Journey,' there are several themes a reader can investigate within Oliver's poem. The text includes themes related to the progression of time/life, strength, and renewal. The latter is one of the most poignant as it only makes itself known in the concluding lines of 'The Journey'.

  2. The Journey Poem Summary and Analysis

    Powered by LitCharts content and AI. Mary Oliver's "The Journey" first appeared in her 1963 collection No Voyage and Other Poems. The poem is about the importance of taking charge of one's own life and leaving behind negative influences. Despite being one of Oliver's more personal poems, and including references to real events in Oliver's life ...

  3. "The Journey" by Mary Oliver: A Complete Analysis

    The Theme of "The Journey" by Mary Oliver. Mary Oliver's "The Journey" is a profound exploration of self-discovery and the courage to embrace change. The poem's central theme revolves around the importance of self-reliance and integrity, urging readers to take charge of their own lives and leave behind negative influences. ...

  4. Analysis of Poem 'The Journey' by Mary Oliver

    Nov 3, 2023 12:27 PM EDT. Mary Oliver. Mary Oliver and a Summary of 'The Journey'. 'The Journey' is a poem that focuses on the need to leave behind what is bad and wrong and harmful and start out on a new path. It has become a popular poem for those seeking guidance and strength in their lives. 'Tell me, what is it you plan to do.

  5. Exploring the Depths of "The Journey": A Literary Analysis by Mary Oliver

    In "The Journey," Mary Oliver explores several themes that are central to the human experience. One of the most prominent themes is the idea of self-discovery and personal growth. The poem follows the speaker as she embarks on a journey of self-discovery, leaving behind the familiar and venturing into the unknown.

  6. A Summary and Analysis of Mary Oliver's 'The Journey'

    'The Journey' is a poem by the American poet Mary Oliver (1935-2019), a poet who has perhaps not received as much attention from critics as she deserves. It's been estimated that she was the bestselling poet in the United States at the time of her death, so a few words of analysis about some of her best-known poems seem appropriate. ...

  7. The Journey poem

    One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice— though the whole house began to tremble and you felt the old tug at your ankles. "Mend my life!" each voice cried. But you didn't stop. You knew what you had to do, though the wind pried with its stiff fingers at the very foundations, though their melancholy was terrible.

  8. The Journey (Mary Oliver poem) Themes

    Self-Improvement. The "journey" of the poem is metaphorical. It is a journey toward self-improvement. The "you" the speaker addresses have become stalled in her path toward self-improvement by those voices offering "bad advice.". This advice is not from external sources but originates inside her own consciousness.

  9. The Journey, by Mary Oliver

    But little by little, as you left their voices behind, the stars began to burn. through the sheets of clouds, and there was a new voice. which you slowly. recognized as your own, that kept you company. as you strode deeper and deeper.

  10. Exploring the characters and key themes in 'The Journey'

    A theme is a big idea, topic or message that appears in a story. Themes in a story are used to convey deeper meaning and messages to the reader. 'The Journey' explores the following themes: war and conflict, resilience, hope and displacement. The girl's emotions change throughout the narrative.

  11. The Journey (Mary Oliver poem) Background

    Broadly, "The Journey" is a poem about transformation. It is a poem that talks about how someone's life can change once they dare to dream and once they dare to act. It is a poem that invites readers to do some self-reflection in their life and asks them to consider if they truly know who they are. For Oliver, "The Journey" was a significant ...

  12. Journey Themes

    Aging. Told from the point of view of a 71-year-old man, "Journey" explores the theme of aging. Throughout the story, the narrator must navigate a world that discriminates against him because of his age. At first, he resists this ageism, displaying fierce self-confidence as he travels into the city to attend a meeting about the future of ...

  13. Mary Oliver The Journey

    enough, and a wild night, and the road full of fallen. branches and stones. But little by little, as you left their voice behind, the stars began to burn. through the sheets of clouds, and there was a new voice. which you slowly.

  14. Mary Oliver's 'The Journey' is a Poem for Those Looking to Make a

    When looking for inspiration to go in a different direction, poetry is an excellent place to turn. Mary Oliver's 'The Journey' is a poem that makes you think. Known for writing about nature, this poem strays from the poet's usual path. Most importantly, it makes you think about yourself. If you're starting introspective journey for a ...

  15. PDF The Journey

    The Journey. Mary OliverOne day you finally knew What you had to do, and began, Though the voices around you Kept shouting Their bad advice‚ Though the whole house Began to tremble And you felt the old tug At. our ankles."Mend. my life!"Each. oice cried.But you di. n't stop.You knew what you had to do, Though the wind pried With its ...

  16. Pokémon Journeys

    The Journey Starts Today (Theme from Pokémon Journeys) · Walk off the Earth & PokémonThe Journey Starts Today (Theme from Pokémon Journeys)℗ 2020 © 2020 The ...

  17. Lifesaving Poems: Mary Oliver's 'The Journey'

    The Journey. One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice- though the whole house began to tremble and you felt the old tug at your ankles. 'Mend my life!' each voice cried. But you didn't stop. You knew what you had to do, though the wind pried with its stiff ...

  18. Why is the journey theme important in Latin or Greek literature?

    One reason the theme of journey is important is that the hero's journey is a striking metaphor for life's journey. This is especially true of Homer's Odyssey in which Odysseus has both beneficial ...

  19. 15+ Best Poems about the Journey, Ranked by Poetry Experts

    In this poem, the theme of journey is central, depicted through the speaker's physical and metaphorical travels along Mississippi Highway 49. Each mile marker represents a step forward in life's journey, symbolizing growth and exploration. The coastal landscape of Gulfport serves as a backdrop for the journey, reflecting the evolving nature of ...

  20. Journey of the Magi Poem Summary and Analysis

    Learn More. "Journey of the Magi" is a poem by T.S. Eliot, first published in 1927 in a series of pamphlets related to Christmas. The poem was written shortly after Eliot's conversion to the Anglican faith. Accordingly, though the poem is an allegorical dramatic monologue that inhabits the voice of one the magi (the three wise men who visit the ...

  21. Journey (band)

    Journey is an American rock band formed in San Francisco in 1973 by former members of Santana, the Steve Miller Band, and Frumious Bandersnatch. ... the band released "Only Solutions" and "1990s Theme" for the 1982 Disney film, Tron. Schon had also made time to work with Jan Hammer on a few albums.

  22. MTYT: The Journey • Worlds of Words

    The Journey is about a family that leaves their town after it is struck with war. What begins as a family adventure turns into escape, then survival. ... The Spring 2020 issue of WOW Libros follows the theme, "Historias que Acompañan en la Distancia." WOW Recommends: Book of the Month. Check out other books featured in WOW Recommends! Authors ...

  23. Journey Motif in Literature: Unveiling Paths of Self-Realization

    Journey Theme in Literature. The journey is used to represent a mental or physical challenge, often daunting, that the characters in question must undertake as a part of their enlightenment integral to their character development. Usually, journeys represent something lacking within the lives of the protagonists, so they leave their current ...

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    Women Evolve in Finance 2024: A Luxe Affair to Remember On May 11, 2024, the pinnacle of elegance and empowerment unfolded at the GameCity rooftop,...

  25. Every BTS song released by members in 2024 (so far)

    B TS songs are known for their catchy tunes and meaningful lyrics, touching on themes such as mental health, fame, youth issues, and the journey towards self-love. Their genuine music has earned ...

  26. Season 31: Season of the Forbidden Archives

    Season Theme. Season 31 is the Season of the Forbidden Archives. Many adventurers have come to learn the power that dwells within the ancient nephalem artifact, Kanai's Cube. ... For Season 31, this means awards originally available from Season 7 are returning to the Season Journey. However, we know it's nice to have something new to aim ...

  27. Former Journey guitarist and founding member dies at 76

    George Tickner, a founding member of the platinum-selling San Francisco rock band Journey, has died at 76, according to guitarist Neal Schon. "You will be missed immensely," Schon wrote in a Facebook post on Tuesday, July 4. "Thank you for your incomparable contributions to Journey's early years." No cause of death was given.

  28. Into the M.A.W. on Steam

    About This Game Four friends each take on a vital role aboard a spaceship and must work together to survive perilous, interconnected missions: The Captain leads the crew by making strategic and story decisions, scanning for intel, and interacting with other vessels.; The Pilot maneuvers through dangers, utilizing cloaking to outsmart enemies and wormholes to flee entirely.