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Diana Muldaur

diana muldaur star trek original series

Series: TOS, TNG

Roles: Science Officer Dr. Ann Mulhall (TOS), Dr. Miranda Jones (TOS), Dr. Katherine Pulaski (TNG)

In 1968, she appeared in the original Star Trek episodes “Return to Tomorrow” (as Science Officer Dr. Ann Mulhall), and in “Is There in Truth No Beauty?” as Dr. Miranda Jones.

In 1988, Muldaur was cast as Dr. Pulaski for the second season of TNG as a replacement for Gates McFadden, the actress who played Beverly Crusher in the first season. Following the end of the second season McFadden returned to the series. Muldaur’s last appearance as Dr. Pulaski was “Shades of Gray”, the final episode of the second season.

diana muldaur star trek original series

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Published Jan 12, 2013

Catching Up With Diana Muldaur, Part 2

diana muldaur star trek original series

Diana Muldaur is a most-formidable woman, and many of her best characters over the years have shared that same trait. Two, of course, immediately spring to mind: Dr. Katherine Pulaski on Star Trek: The Next Generation and Rosalind Shays on L.A. Law . Crafting those ladies, Muldaur brilliantly meshed an icy-cool demeanor, smarts, a certain sense of style and – more with Dr. Pulaski than Shays – a touch of warmth. Fans haven’t seen much of the actress lately, as she spent several years back in her family home on Martha’s Vineyard tending to her husband, film and television writer Robert Dozier, who passed away on January 6, 2012, following a long illness. Now, however, Muldaur – who also portrayed Dr. Ann Mulhall in the TOS hour “ Return to Tomorrow ” and Dr. Miranda Jones in another TOS episodes, “ Is There In Truth No Beauty? ” -- is slowly stepping back into spotlight.She attended Creation Entertainment’s Official Star Trek Convention in Las Vegas this past August, sat for an interview included among the extras on the recently released Star Trek: The Next Generation Season Two Blu-ray set, and told StarTrek.com during a recent conversation that she’s eager to get back into the game, perhaps as a producer. Yesterday, in part one of an extensive interview with Muldaur, she discussed her life today and reminisced about her TOS appearances. Today, in the second half of our conversation, she recounts her memories of working on TNG . You mentioned a couple of times in the first part of our conversation that it was your agent and not Gene Roddenberry who phoned you to be on TOS . But, when Roddenberry did his pilot for Planet Earth after Trek ended, was that a direct call from him to you to ask you to be involved? Muldaur: No. Really, they never are. They always go through the agent. I didn’t really know Gene. I only got to know Gene through the Star Trek Christmas parties. I got to know him and Majel, a little bit, too. I remember that they brought their son to lunch on the set of Planet Earth . He was a little baby. Out came Majel with the baby, and we all went, “Oh, isn’t he handsome and marvelous and wonderful,” and so he was. So that was Planet Earth . Also, as we’re talking, I looked up “Return to Tomorrow” and “Is There in Truth No Beauty?,” and they had the same director, Ralph Senensky. Often directors that enjoy working with you – or the producer, or the main actors – sometimes they throw the name out. You never know where your name came from. So maybe Gene did ask for me on Planet Earth , but remember, it wasn’t a running part. It was a guest star. Years pass and TNG rolls around. How surprised were you to receive a call from… your agent about joining the cast for season two? Muldaur: Very surprised. Gene had a sidekick, a very good producer, who came to see me. Who was that…? Probably… Robert Justman. Muldaur: Yes, Bob Justman always liked my work and he, in fact, came to see me on the set of Star Trek: The Next Generation and said to me how lovely I still was. “Thank you, very much,” said I. No, it’s always if you’re a good actor, everybody wants you. That it worked out that I could do those Star Trek things when I did those Star Trek things, that’s something else. It’s all timing. I missed out on one of the Pink Panther movies because I chose to do Born Free . I was going to be in Africa for a year. I got the offer for the Pink Panther when I was in London on my way to Africa for Born Free . It’s just all a matter of timing.

diana muldaur star trek original series

Going into TNG , what were your hopes for Dr. Pulaski? On paper, what did you like about her? Muldaur: First of all, I didn’t like her name. So I said, “I might do it if you can change her first name.” Gene stared at me very strangely and said, “Let me think about it.” Then he said, “OK, you pick your own first name.” I thought Kate would work just fine. And I loved the name Pulaski. What did I think about her? I was always asked to play doctors or lawyers. It’s what I’d done for years and years and years. Then this was fascinating because I was using all these marvelous devices that were invented in the future, and I had to learn how to pretend to use them. So that’s how I spent a lot of my time, learning how to do that. And I think they wanted a fine actress to work with their fine actor from England. That’s what I think they wanted, but I don’t really know for sure. Back to the question of hopes and expectations, though. How close did the reality of playing Pulaski come to what you had in mind for this woman? Muldaur: I think it was just starting, but I never really planned to be there very long. As it turns out, I used the show where I aged to show to the L.A. Law people, to get L.A. Law . That’s the film they looked at. So you knew going in that TNG would only be a one-season gig for you? Muldaur: Yes, as far as I was concerned. Were you relieved, then, when they brought back Gates McFadden for season three? Muldaur: It didn’t matter. There’s no bringing people back. People have tried to create some kind of something out of it, but she played one part and I played a totally different part. I played a totally different person. I was much closer to the original doctor, which is what I wanted to do, which I thought was more fun for me to do. So, no, it would not have been good to have continued very much longer, even though everyone was really lovely.

diana muldaur star trek original series

Have you ever met McFadden? Even at a convention? Muldaur: No, I haven’t. And somehow I never see the people that I do know, that I worked with, that I’d love to give hugs to. I don’t know how that happens. We all go shooting off in our own way. I’ve only been to a few conventions through all these years and never really have run into anyone. Looking back at TNG , which episode from season two did you think worked best? Muldaur: I loved the episode where we were in England. “ Elementary Dear Data ,” we think you mean. Muldaur: Yes, the holodeck episode where we were all dressed in character. I loved Daniel Davis, who played Moriarty. He was a sweet man, too. The guest stars were always more fun than not. He was really, really wonderful. In fact, Daniel was on a Star Trek cruise I took, where we went down to Jamaica and ended up rescuing some people from Cuba who had strung some damned tires together and were floating on that, not too successfully. We made the captain turn around and pick them up.

diana muldaur star trek original series

Not that this has a whole lot to do with anything, but what are the odds of you, Gene Roddenberry and Jonathan Frakes all sharing the same birthday: August 19. Muldaur: I think that’s extraordinary. I’m not sure what that means, but we’ll know after we’re all gone. You let me know on my epitaph. Just say, “A-ha, now we’ve figured out why they all have the same birthday.” Because it is amazing. If you had it all to do again, would you still have done the one season of TNG ? Muldaur: Of course. Oh, absolutely. Everything is important in your life. The other marvelous thing that happened during that was we had Colin Powell, who was then the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, visit the set. He came onto the set just so he could sit in the chair. The red phone was there, in some other guy’s hands, so he could get on the phone instantly if he had to. It was the most marvelous bit of Hollywood; couldn’t believe it.Click HERE to read part one of our interview with Diana Muldaur. And click HERE to learn more about the Animal Shelter of Martha’s Vineyard.

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The Intriguing World Of Entertainment

Whatever Happened to Diana Muldaur, Doctor Pulaski From Star Trek: The Next Generation?

By Nick Lee | August 22, 2023

Diana Muldaur - Star Trek TNG

Star Trek fans will remember Diana Muldaur for her role as Dr. Katherine Pulaski on Star Trek: The Next Generation during the show’s second season in 1988-1989.

However, Muldaur had a long acting career before and after her brief time on the Enterprise. Though she never became a household name, she worked consistently in television and film from the 1960s up until the early 2000s.

She played varied roles across multiple genres, from soap operas to sci-fi. Beyond Star Trek, audiences may also know Muldaur from her Emmy-nominated role as cutthroat lawyer Rosalind Shays on L.A. Law.

But what has she been up to in recent years? Let’s delve into the life and career of this talented actress.

Background Information

Born on August 19, 1938, in Brooklyn, New York, Diana Muldaur embarked on her acting journey during her high school years.

She further honed her skills at Sweet Briar College in Virginia, graduating in 1960. Under the guidance of the legendary Stella Adler, Muldaur made a name for herself on the New York stage.

Earl Career

Diana Muldaur young

Diana Muldaur began acting in television in the early 1960s, appearing in soap operas like The Secret Storm and The Doctors.

Her early TV roles were mostly guest spots on various dramas and westerns, including Gunsmoke, I Spy, Judd for the Defense, and Star Trek.

She also had a recurring role as Ann Wicker on the soap opera The Secret Storm from 1963-1965.

Diana Muldaur Star Trek: TOS

Muldaur transitioned to film acting in the late 1960s, appearing in movies like The Swimmer (1968) and Number One (1969).

However, she continued working regularly in television throughout the 1960s and 1970s, guest starring on shows like Hawaii Five-O, Marcus Welby M.D., and Charlie’s Angels.

Star Trek: The Next Generation

Diana Muldaur - Star Trek TNG

Muldaur’s association with “Star Trek” began in the late 1960s when she appeared in two episodes of “Star Trek: The Original Series,” portraying two distinct characters, Dr. Miranda Jones and Ann Mulhall.

Her bond with the show’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, led to her casting as Dr. Katherine Pulaski in the second season of “Star Trek: The Next Generation.”

Her character arc, while rich and varied, was short-lived, leading to numerous speculations and discussions about her departure and the mixed reactions she elicited from the fanbase.

Dr. Pulaski was introduced in the second season of “Star Trek: The Next Generation” as the chief medical officer aboard the USS Enterprise-D, replacing Dr. Beverly Crusher.

Her character was seasoned, having had a long and distinguished career in Starfleet before joining the Enterprise.

Throughout the season, she was involved in various missions, from being abducted by a hologram of Professor James Moriarty during a Sherlock Holmes holodeck experience to playing a pivotal role in investigating a mysterious aging disease on the USS Lantree.

Reason for Departure

The exact reasons for Dr. Pulaski’s departure from the show after just one season remain a topic of speculation.

Behind the scenes, it’s believed that the character was introduced as a temporary replacement for Dr. Beverly Crusher, with Gates McFadden (who portrayed Crusher) returning in the third season.

The show’s creators might have intended for Pulaski to bring a different dynamic to the ship’s crew, reminiscent of Dr. Leonard McCoy’s more traditional, skeptical demeanor from the original series.

However, with McFadden’s return, Pulaski’s character was written out without a detailed on-screen explanation.

Divisiveness Among Fans

Dr. Pulaski’s character was divisive for several reasons:

Contrast with Crusher: Fans had grown accustomed to Dr. Beverly Crusher’s gentle and compassionate demeanor in the first season. In contrast, Pulaski’s more gruff and direct approach was a stark departure, leading to initial resistance from some fans.

Relationship with Data: One of the most notable aspects of Pulaski’s character was her skepticism towards Lieutenant Commander Data, the ship’s android officer. Unlike most of the crew, she often questioned Data’s ability to understand human emotions or nuances, even mispronouncing his name as a subtle sign of her disbelief in his sentience. This dynamic, while intended to create tension and drama, was off-putting to many fans who had grown fond of Data.

Comparison to Dr. McCoy: While the creators might have aimed for Pulaski to channel the spirit of the original series’ Dr. McCoy, some fans felt that this was forced and that the character lacked the organic charm and wit of “Bones” McCoy.

Diana Muldaur - LA Law

After her time on “Star Trek,” Muldaur earned two Emmy nominations for her role as lawyer Rosalind Shays on “L.A. Law.”

Rosalind Shays was a complex character, known for being ruthless, greedy, and manipulative. She was introduced as a partner in the law firm and quickly became the series’ main antagonist during her tenure.

Diana Muldaur’s exit from “L.A. Law” was as dramatic as her character’s tenure on the show. In a candid discussion, Muldaur revealed that she had no prior knowledge of her character’s fate until she read the script.

The shocking moment where her character, Rosalind Shays, meets her end by falling down an elevator shaft was a surprise not just to the audience but to Muldaur herself.

Initially, the producers wanted Muldaur to perform the elevator fall, which was a significant drop. Concerned for her safety, Muldaur declined, leading to the use of a stunt double.

This stunt double had to perform the challenging fall multiple times, around ten, before the director was satisfied with the shot. Muldaur expressed her admiration for the stunt double’s resilience and dedication.

She described the cast of “L.A. Law” as “the closest family” and expressed her joy at playing a character as dynamic as Shays. She would act in the series alongside notable actresses Michele Greene and Susan Dey .

Later Career

After her Emmy-nominated role as Rosalind Shays on L.A. Law from 1986-1991, Diana Muldaur continued working steadily in television throughout the 1990s and into the early 2000s.

She made guest appearances on shows like Empty Nest, Batman: The Animated Series, Perry Mason movies, and had a recurring role on The Legend of Prince Valiant.

Some of her last on-screen roles were on series like The Practice and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit in the early 2000s.

Though her acting output slowed in her later years, Muldaur had an extensive and varied television career for over four decades, transitioning from ingenue roles in the 1960s to mature, authoritative women in the 1980s and beyond.

She leveraged her recognizability from L.A. Law to land recurring and guest spots through the twilight of her acting career.

What is Diana Muldaur Doing Now?

Diana Muldaur now

In an interview, Diana Muldaur shed light on her current life and interests. Residing in Martha’s Vineyard, a place she has connections to since her childhood, Diana enjoys the tranquility and beauty of the island, especially during the quieter off-peak seasons. She has a deep passion for sailing and has even participated in races, notably winning an entire season two years ago in the Herreshoff fleet with her H 12 boat. Tennis is another sport she indulges in, keeping her active and engaged.

Beyond physical activities, Diana has taken a keen interest in playing duplicate bridge. She finds the game infinitely fascinating, emphasizing the continuous learning it offers. She appreciates the game’s focus on play rather than socializing, which aligns with her preference for privacy.

Diana also touched upon her past involvement with breeding Airedale Terriers, a commitment she held for 35 years. While she no longer breeds them, she still has two dogs and remains influential in the breeding community. She mentioned that breeders from England have sought her expertise and the use of frozen sperm from her past champion dogs to rejuvenate the breed.

Travel remains a significant part of her life. Diana expressed her love for exploring remote places around the world, from Patagonia to Siberia. These travels are not just for leisure; she emphasizes the importance of giving back and tries to contribute positively wherever she goes.

In essence, Diana Muldaur’s current life is a blend of relaxation, hobbies, and a continued commitment to making a positive impact, reflecting her multifaceted personality and diverse interests.

Related Posts:

Denise Crosby - Star Trek

About Nick Lee

Nick is a Senior Staff Writer for Ned Hardy. Some of his favorite subjects include sci-fi, history, and obscure facts about 90's television. When he's not writing, he's probably wondering how Frank Dux got 52 consecutive knockouts in a single tournament. More from Nick

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5 ways dr. crusher deserved better on star trek: tng.

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10 Best Dr. Crusher TNG & Star Trek Picard Episodes

Jean-luc picard and beverly crusher's star trek romance explained, wesley crusher’s star trek return includes tng easter egg wil wheaton loved.

  • Dr. Beverly Crusher, a key character in Star Trek: The Next Generation, was often underutilized and sidelined in favor of other characters.
  • Despite being a popular character, she was replaced in season 2 by Dr. Katherine Pulaski, due to behind-the-scenes conflicts.
  • Dr. Crusher's character was often one-dimensional, as a compassionate doctor and mother, and her potential for more development was not fully realized.

Star Trek: The Next Generation often underutilized Dr. Beverly Crusher, despite being the Chief Medical Officer on the USS Enterprise-D. Dr. Crusher was an intelligent and compassionate doctor, who served as CMO while also caring for her teenage son, Wesley Crusher (Wil Wheaton). Dr. Crusher served under the command of Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), who was her close, personal friend and potential love interest. Throughout TNG , Picard and Crusher appear to display feelings for one another, but they never truly explore a romantic relationship.

When given solid material, the versatile Gates McFadden proved she had the acting skills to do more, but Dr. Beverly Crusher was often sidelined in favor of other Star Trek: The Next Generation character s. Not only was Dr. Crusher unceremoniously replaced in TNG season 2, but she also got less development than many of TNG's male characters. While Star Trek: The Next Generation was progressive in many ways, it sometimes failed its female characters. Although Beverly didn't fare quite as poorly as Counselor Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis) in this regard, there were several times throughout TNG when Dr. Crusher deserved better.

Gates McFadden has had many great moments during her time as Dr. Beverly Crusher, and here are 10 of her best episodes from TNG and Picard.

5 Dr. Crusher Was Unceremoniously Replaced In Star Trek: TNG Season 2

Gates mcfadden was fired after tng season 1..

Despite being a popular character with Star Trek: The Next Generation fans, Dr. Beverly Crusher was replaced in TNG season 2 by Dr. Katherine Pulaski (Diana Muldaur). With a harsher bedside manner than Crusher, Pulaski was meant to channel the personality of Dr. Leonard McCoy (DeForest Kelley) from Star Trek: The Original Series . However, this dynamic didn't work as well on TNG, and Pulaski proved less popular among fans than Crusher was.

In-universe, Dr. Beverly Crusher's departure was explained with a line of dialogue about how she had become Head of Starfleet Medical, but the real reason had to do with behind-the-scenes conflicts. Star Trek: The Next Generation season 2 showrunner Maurice Hurley disliked Gates McFadden and the character of Dr. Crusher, so he had her fired after season 1. It felt odd and unfair for Dr. Crusher to be replaced with so little fanfare, especially considering her son Wesley remained on the Enterprise.

Dr. Crusher returned in Star Trek: The Next Generation season 3 and remained for the rest of the series, thanks largely to support from fans and a plea from Patrick Stewart himself.

4 Beverly Crusher Was One-Dimensional As A Caregiver & Mother

Dr. crusher had the potential to be so much more..

One of Dr. Beverly Crusher's most important attributes was her profound empathy and conviction regarding right and wrong. Crusher was one of the few USS Enterprise-D officers who would openly challenge Captain Picard when she felt it necessary, and she sometimes violated the Prime Directive in the name of compassion. While this was certainly a strength of Dr. Crusher's, she rarely got to be anything else. While characters like Lt. Commander Data (Brent Spiner) and Lt. Worf (Michael Dorn) got to be many different things, Beverly was pigeonholed as the compassionate doctor and matronly mother.

Although Dr. Crusher and her son Wesley always appeared to have a positive mother/son relationship, Beverly was too often reduced to playing the role of a nagging, sitcom-style mother. Wesley would go to the male crew members on the Enterprise for advice, which Gates McFadden has said she found insulting. While it makes sense that Wesley would seek out a father figure for certain problems, he seems like the type of son who would have trusted his mom's advice, too.

3 Dr. Crusher Never Got To Have A True Romance With Captain Picard

Both crusher & picard had other love interests throughout tng..

Although Star Trek: The Next Generation season 1 teased a romantic connection between Dr. Beverly Crusher and Captain Jean-Luc Picard, the two were never allowed to officially become a couple on screen. This was largely due to Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry , who didn't want to shake up the status quo of TNG's crew so drastically. Picard's friendship with Beverly's deceased first husband, Lt. Commander Jack R. Crusher (Doug Wert), also complicated matters, but Beverly and Jean-Luc clearly cared about each other from the start.

Although they never officially got together on screen, Jean-Luc Picard and Beverly Crusher share a love story that has endured for decades.

Throughout Star Trek: The Next Generation, Captain Picard remained closed off from most of his crew members, rarely revealing his true feelings. Although Beverly Crusher was more open in her relationships, she held back from admitting her feelings for Picard. Neither Beverly nor Jean-Luc fully express their feelings for one another until TNG season 7, episode 8, "Attached," but it's only because they can hear one another's thoughts. The Star Trek: The Next Generation movies ignored Beverly and Jean-Luc's history, instead pairing Captain Picard with other love interests.

Star Trek: Picard season 3 revealed that Beverly and Jean-Luc did go on a romantic vacation sometime after Star Trek: Nemesis, which later resulted in the birth of Jack Crusher (Ed Speleers). Beverly kept Jack from Jean-Luc, however, fearing for her son's safety in the face of Picard's many enemies.

2 Star Trek: TNG's "Chain of Command" Fails Dr. Crusher

Crusher could have been an action hero, as well as a doctor, scientist, and mother..

In Star Trek: The Next Generation season 6, episode 10, "Chain of Command, Part I", Dr. Crusher joins Captain Picard and Lt. Worf (Michael Dorn) on a covert mission to destroy Cardassian biological weapons. While this sets up a fun, more action-oriented story for Dr. Crusher, "Chain of Command" ultimately fails the Enterprise doctor. While training for the mission, Beverly struggles to keep up, even though she should have gone through all the same physical training as the men around her.

Although Crusher is on this particular mission to identify and destroy any biotoxins, she is forced to use her "feminine charms" to convince a Ferengi to provide her team with transportation. Crusher later gets covered by rubble while crawling through a cave, prompting Worf to go back and rescue her. "Chain of Command" had the opportunity to add more layers to Beverly Crusher by showing her competence as a Starfleet officer. Instead, the episode reduces Crusher to a pretty face and a damsel in distress.

Star Trek: Picard season 3 finally gave viewers a more three-dimensional version of Dr. Crusher, showing that she can be a compassionate doctor, a brilliant scientist, a great mother, and fire a weapons system with frightening accuracy.

1 Dr. Crusher Had A Bizarre Romance With A Ghost In Star Trek: TNG's "Sub Rosa"

Beverly's romance with ronin in tng season 7, episode 14, "sub rosa" is out of character..

Last, but not least, Star Trek: The Next Generation's infamous ghost romance episode, "Sub Rosa," is not a great look for Dr. Beverly Crusher. When Beverly attends her grandmother's funeral on Caldos IV, she encounters a "ghost" named Ronin (Duncan Regehr), who her grandmother had been involved with romantically. Ronin claims to now be in love with Beverly, and he manipulates her mind so that she develops feelings for him, too.

Dr. Crusher so believes herself to be in love with Ronin, that she leaves her position on the Enterprise to live on Caldos IV with him. When Captain Picard beams down to question Ronin, Ronin attacks him, which helps snap Beverly out of her infatuation with the ghostly being. Ronin then reveals himself to be an anaphasic alien who has fed on the women of Beverly's family for generations. Dr. Crusher eventually thwarts Ronin, but the whole story is simply bizarre, and it's unfortunate that it remains one of Crusher's most memorable episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Star Trek: The Next Generation

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Star Trek: The Next Generation is the third installment in the sci-fi franchise and follows the adventures of Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew members of the USS Enterprise. Set around one hundred years after the original series, Picard and his crew travel through the galaxy in largely self-contained episodes exploring the crew dynamics and their own political discourse. The series also had several overarching plots that would develop over the course of the isolated episodes, with four films released in tandem with the series to further some of these story elements.

Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987)

The Biography

What is Diana Muldaur doing today? aka Katherine on Star Trek

• Diana Muldaur is an American actress from Brooklyn, New York born on 19 August 1938. • She has over 100 acting credits to her name, known best for her portrayal of Chris Coughlin in the action crime series “McCloud”. • Her last TV series role before retiring from acting was her voicing of Dr. Leslie Thompkins in the animated action adventure “Batman: The Animated Series”. • Her last movie role before retiring was in the 1991 mystery crime drama “Perry Mason: The Cast of the Fatal Fashion”. • She is 82 years old, has long brown hair and brown eyes, her height is 5ft 5ins (1.66m) and her net worth is estimated at over $3 million.

  • 1 Who is Diana Muldaur?
  • 2 Early life and education
  • 3 Roles in TV series
  • 4 Roles in movies
  • 5 Other credits
  • 6 Awards and nominations
  • 7 Love life and relationships
  • 8 Hobbies and interesting facts
  • 9 Age, height and net worth

Who is Diana Muldaur?

Diana Charlton Muldaur was born in Brooklyn, New York City USA, on 19 August 1938 – her zodiac sign is Leo and she holds American nationality. She’s an actress with over 100 acting credits to her name, while she’s probably still known best for her portrayal of Chris Coughlin in the action crime series “McCloud”, created by Herman Miller and which aired from 1970 to 1977. It follows a deputy marshal from New Mexico who’s now assigned to Manhattan’s 27th Precinct – the series won one of the 11 awards for which it was nominated, including six Primetime Emmy nominations.

Early life and education

Diana was raised in Brooklyn alongside her younger brother Geoff Muldaur, an American musician, by their parents Charles Edward Arrowsmith Muldaur and Alice Patricia Muldaur.

She grew up being interested in acting, and it was during her freshman year at a local high school that she appeared in her first play, before in 1954 aged 16, Diana launched her acting career with her portrayal of Ann Wicker in the romantic drama series “The Secret Storm”. However, her following role would come nine years later, because upon matriculating in 1956 , Diana enrolled at Sweet Briar College from which she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1960, and then practiced acting under the American actress and acting teacher Stella Adler.

Roles in TV series

In 1963, Diana was cast to play Ann Carwell in the long-running romantic drama “The Doctors”, which aired from 1963 to 1982 numbering 3,687 episodes. In 1969, she was cast to play one of the lead characters, Belle in the drama “The Survivors” which also starred Lana Turner, George Hamilton and Kevin McCarthy, and follows a woman who’s trying to protect her son from her family’s influence.

The following years saw Diana appear in an episode or two of many series, such as the crime drama “Dan August”, the western “Alias Smith and Jones”, and the drama “Marcus Welby, M. D.” In 1974, she portrayed Joy Adamson, one of the lead characters in the family adventure “Born Free”, which also starred Gary Collins and Hal Frederick, and follows the lives of two married game wardens working in Kenya.

Between 1976 and 1978, Diana could’ve been seen portraying Judge Eleanor Hooper in the comedy “The Tony Randall Show”, and in 1979, she played Ginny Linden in the comedy “Hizonner”. In 1988 and 1989, she was cast as Doctor Pulaski in the critically acclaimed mystery action adventure “Star Trek: The Next Generation”, created by Gene Roddenberry, and which starred Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner and Jonathan Frakes. It follows several Starfleet officers who have embarked on a mission ‘to go where no one has gone before’, and the series won 36 awards including 18 Primetime Emmys, while it was nominated for 61 other awards.

Diana’s final TV series role before retiring from acting was her voicing of Dr. Leslie Thompkins in the animated action adventure “Batman: The Animated Series”, created by five people and which starred Kevin Conroy, Loren Lester and Efrem Zimbalist Jr.

It aired from 1992 to 1995, and follows The Dark Knight who’s fighting crime in Gotham City, while sometimes being helped by his friends Batgirl and Robin. The series won five awards including a Primetime Emmy, while it was nominated for 19 other awards.

Roles in movies

During her career, Diana was mostly focused on appearing in TV series, and doesn’t have as many movie credits.

She made her debut film appearance in 1968, with her portrayal of Cynthia in the drama “The Swimmer”, which starred Burt Lancaster, Janet Landgard and Janice Rule, and follows a man who’s spending a single summer day swimming in many pools. The movie eventually won a 2015 Satellite Award for Outstanding Overall Blue-Ray/DVD. Some of Diana’s following roles were in the sports drama “Number One”, the crime drama “The Last of the Powerseekers” both in 1969, and the 1970 mystery crime drama “The Lawyer”.

diana muldaur star trek original series

In 1972, she was cast to play Alexandra, one of the lead characters in the mystery horror drama “The Other”, adapted by Tom Tryon based on his novel, and directed by Robert Mulligan. It also starred Uta Hagen and Chris Udvarnoky, and follows several accidents which have happened in a small American farming community, with the people blaming two identical twin brothers and their parents. The movie won Robert Muligan a Sitges – Catalonian International Film Festival Award for Best Director. A couple of Diana’s following appearances were in the 1973 drama “Ordeal”, the 1974 action crime drama “McQ” and the 1977 drama “Pine Canyon Is Burning”.

In 1986, she played a supporting character in the mystery crime drama “Murder in Three Acts”, based on the novel by Agatha Christie, directed by Gary Nelson and which starred Peter Ustinov, Tony Curtis and Emma Samms. It follows Hercule Poirot who’s investigating the death of two people at two parties – the movie was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award.

Three of Diana’s final movie roles before retiring from acting were in the 1989 action thriller “The Return of Sam McCloud”, the 1991 mystery crime drama “Perry Mason: The Cast of the Fatal Fashion”, and later that year the drama “Locked Up: A Mother’s Rage”. It appears as she has just recently come out of retirement, and is currently shooting for the upcoming drama “Finding Hannah”.

Other credits

Diana has been featured in various TV specials, including “The 36th Primetime Emmy Awards” in 1984, “The 37th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards” in 1985, and “The 43rd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards” in 1991.

She’s also appeared in a couple of documentary movies, including the 2012 “Making It So: Continuing Star Trek – The Next Generation” and the 2014 “Chaos on the Bridge”.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Katrin Röder (@katarine_md)

Diana has made a guest appearance in several talk-shows too, such as “The Alan Hamel Show”, “Hour Magazine” and “Donahue”.

Awards and nominations

She has been nominated for four awards for her performance in the series “L. A. Law”. In both 1990 and 1991, Diana was nominated for a Viewers for Quality Television Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Quality Drama Series and in the same two years for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series.

Love life and relationships

Diana met her future first husband James Vickery, the late American actor, on the set of the soap opera “The Secret Storm”, and they exchanged vows on 26 July 1969 in front of their closest friends and family members.

The two could’ve been seen attending all their events together – it’s widely believed that neither wanted children as they preferred to focus on their careers. The marriage ended on 19 October 1979, when James lost his fight against cancer.

On 11 October 1981, Diana married the American film writer and producer Robert Dozier and the two also decided not to have children; some believe that Diana’s perhaps infertile. The marriage lasted until 6 January 2012 when Robert died of prostate cancer.

Diana hasn’t spoken of any other men whom she has perhaps been with, and as of May 2021, she’s single, was married twice and doesn’t have children.

Hobbies and interesting facts

Diana’s a huge dog-lover and was once a breeder and owner of Airedale Terriers. She also served as a judge at various dog competitions.

diana muldaur star trek original series

Diana loves to travel, and has been all around the US, visiting nearly every state thanks to her acting career. She has also been to various European countries, while her dream travel destination is Paris in France.

In 2000, she wanted to undergo face-lift surgery but eventually decided against it, claiming that ‘somebody has to look the right age’.

She’s keen on reading books, and has read numerous.

In her spare time, Diana likes to watch movies starring her favorite actors and actresses Heath Ledger, Johnny Depp and Julia Roberts, such as “The Dark Knight”, the franchise “Pirates of the Caribbean”, and “Runaway Bride”.

Age, height and net worth

Diana’s age is 82. She has long brown hair and brown eyes, her height is 5ft 5ins (1.66m) and she weighs around 128lbs (58kgs).

As of May 2021, her net worth has been estimated at over $3 million.

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Why These Star Trek Actors Really Left The Franchise

Kirstie Alley as Saavik

In the expansive "Star Trek" universe, some of its brightest stars embarked on unforeseen journeys, abruptly departing the franchise to both the dismay and intrigue of fandom.

Why didn't Kirstie Alley return as the beloved Lt. Saavik? What prompted Jeffrey Hunter to relinquish the role of Captain Pike? Who ejected Gates McFadden's Dr. Crusher from the airlock? How come Diana Muldaur, her replacement, endured only a single season? Why did Wil Wheaton part ways with Wesley Crusher? And why was Grace Lee Whitney, as Yeoman Janice Rand, dropped from the cast even before the original series premiered in 1966?

These departures stemmed from a myriad of forces: financial constraints, contract negotiations, miscasting, yearnings for new horizons or strange new opportunities, life-altering events, creative and personal conflicts, or a blend of these influences. Most were unexpected and frequently controversial. Whether these exits bolstered or hindered the franchise, the judgment is yours, but here's how and why they happened.

Jeffrey Hunter disliked the first pilot

Jeffrey Hunter's brief "Star Trek" stint can be attributed to a blend of personal choices and professional considerations. He originated the role of Captain Christopher Pike in the original pilot, "The Cage," filmed in late 1964. However, when the NBC network didn't pick up the series, Hunter's obligation ended. Desilu Productions invited him back for the second pilot. He declined.

Speculation runs rampant regarding the reasons. Accounts from those close to the matter differ on specifics but all concur that Hunter was unenthusiastic about returning. In 1972, former Desilu V.P. Oscar Katz recounted that following a screening of the pilot, "Word came back that [Hunter] didn't want to do it because he didn't like the show." With Desilu's business affairs department and Hunter's agent miles apart, and time running out to cast the second pilot, tempers got short. "One day I said, 'Well, forget it, we'll sign another lead.'" Thus, Captain Pike's mantle went to William Shatner's Captain Kirk.

The unaired pilot eventually became part of the episode "The Menagerie," but even that required negotiations between Desilu and Hunter to reuse the footage within the series. We can thank Hunter for agreeing to those terms.

Denise Crosby requested permission to disembark

Production of Season 1 of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" was a train wreck, as reported in William Shatner's documentary "Chaos On the Bridge." The problems stemmed from the "Trek" offices. Writer turnover was the norm, and "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry's decisions ran roughshod over everyone, even "Trek" veterans like Dorothy Fontana.

Amidst this chaos, planned characterizations and dynamics didn't quite play out. The scripts were especially bad for the female leads, who found themselves backgrounded. Writers especially didn't know what to do with Counselor Troi (Marina Sirtis), so much so that she vanished from several episodes. Sirtis says she was nearly written out of the show. They spared Sirtis but cast mate  Denise Crosby was struggling with her underdeveloped character, Tasha Yar. "I had all these ideas and couldn't do them. I was just stage dressing. I chose to leave instead of just being satisfied with that." It was Roddenberry's idea to have the character die. He thought it would be shocking.

In the realm of "Star Trek," it seemed impossible for Yar to vanish permanently. Time travel shenanigans brought her back twice for massively popular and important episodes, and Crosby also played Yar's Romulan daughter, Sela, several times. "I never regretted my decision," said Crosby. "My favorite episode was "Yesterday's Enterprise." I had to die and leave the show in order to do [it]. There is some irony in that."

Gates McFadden ran afoul of the head writer

Gates McFadden's abrupt exit from "TNG" at the end of season one stunned fans. As the actress behind Dr. Beverly Crusher, she played an integral role in the show's familial dynamics. Her character's departure, leaving her son Wesley (Wil Wheaton) aboard the Enterprise, struck many as absurd. Speculation swirled regarding conflicts with higher-ups, including producer Maurice Hurley, and disagreements about her character's portrayal.

In a recent interview, Michael Rosenbaum questioned McFadden about whether her working relationship with Hurley led to her departure. She acknowledged the possibility, stating, "I think I definitely pissed him off." She cited concerns about the initial season's regressive portrayal of women in scripts and her dissatisfaction with the portrayal of Crusher's relationship with Wesley. "I kept saying, why is it that I've raised this genius kid... and yet every time there's anything, even possibly serious, it's only the male characters that talk to him," she explained. "She's a scientist. I'm not buying this."

The cast and fans alike didn't buy her farewell, which led to problems for her successor, Diana Muldaur. For fans of McFadden and Crusher, this unfortunate state of affairs lasted only one year. McFadden would return to the enterprise that was "TNG" in season three and stayed on for the rest of the show's run. She also reprised the role for the "TNG" movies and "Star Trek: Picard." 

Diana Muldaur was never welcomed aboard

Following Gates McFadden's forced exit from "TNG," the powers that be decided to replace the character rather than recast the role. Executive producer and "Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry went to his go-to list to call upon Diana Muldaur. She had previously appeared twice (as different characters) on the OG "Trek" and starred in his pilot telefilm "Planet Earth." Muldaur took on the role of Dr. Katherine Pulaski and joined "TNG" during season two.

However, it wasn't a seamless transition. Rumors circulated that the cast, loyal to McFadden, did not welcome Muldaur. Audience response was mixed. Pulaski introduced a fresh dynamic with her no-nonsense demeanor but her early treatment of Lt. Commander Data (Brent Spiner) rubbed many viewers the wrong way.

Regarding her departure, Muldaur has revealed few details, aside from a scheduling conflict with the first episodes of "TNG's" season three when she was asked to reprise her role in a "McCloud" reunion telefilm. Her involvement in "TNG" was initially a favor to Roddenberry, and as his role diminished, she had little reason to stay. Her exit, however, proved fortuitous. She joined the cast of "LA Law" in her signature role as the scheming Rosalind Shays, a character who executed one of TV history's most memorable and shocking goodbyes.

Walter Koenig's Chekov was one ruble too many for Star Trek's animated adventures

George Takei and Nichelle Nichols, celebrated for their iconic portrayals of Sulu and Uhura in the original "Star Trek" series, triumphantly returned to their roles for the animated "Star Trek" series (1973–1974). However, their participation almost never happened. Filmation Associates, the animation company, initially aimed to cast only five original series actors. While William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, and DeForest Kelley reclaimed their signature roles, Takei and Nichols were left out in the cold. James Doohan was to assume the mantle of Scotty and all other male characters, including Sulu. Majel Barrett Roddenberry was to resume her role as Nurse Chapel and perform all other female characters, including Uhura.

Nimoy, however, nobly rebelled, stating , "I refused to do Spock until they were hired." With that, Filmation welcomed Takei and Nichols aboard. Takei and Walter Koenig corroborated Nimoy's stance in the documentary "For the Love of Spock" (2016).

However, this was not one big happy fleet. Koenig, known for his portrayal of Chekov, found himself excluded from the animated adaptation due to cost constraints, and, regrettably, no advocate championed his cause. They instead offered Koenig the opportunity to pen an episode, resulting in the peculiar segment "The Infinite Vulcan."

Geneviève Bujold couldn't take the tech

Geneviève Bujold's swift exit from the lead role of Captain Nicole Janeway in "Star Trek: Voyager" remains a curious chapter in the franchise's history. Initially cast as the intrepid Starfleet captain, Bujold left the production just days into filming the pilot episode.

Bujold's departure stemmed from a mismatch in role expectations and the demanding production schedule. On set, she discovered a lack of interest in portraying the authoritative figure of a starship captain, preferring to play the role as  a scientist . Like many actors, she struggled with the technical jargon and dialogue ( as seen in this clip ). Not even a week passed before she declared herself unsuited for the role and she and the production parted ways.

Her exit opened the door for the casting of Kate Mulgrew — who'd been in the running to play Nicole Janeway — as the renamed Captain Kathryn Janeway. The role would become iconic in the "Star Trek" universe. Bujold's departure serves as a lesson, underscoring the unique demands of television production and the delicate balance between an actor's artistic preferences and the dramatic imperatives of an established franchise.

Michelle Forbes chose to beam out rather than be tied down

While "TNG" grappled with a lot of offscreen drama involving its regular female cast members — namely Sirtis, Crosby, McFadden, and Muldaur — Michelle Forbes' departure took a different, more amicable path.

Forbes brought complexity and charisma to the character of Ensign Ro Laren during her seven appearances on "TNG." There were initial plans to transition her to "Deep Space Nine" as a core cast member. Producer Michael Piller noted , "Michelle Forbes is a wonderful actress, and her character of Ensign Ro created the entire canvas for this new series... It had always been assumed that she would be one of the people spun off and moved over to the new series."

However, Forbes harbored other aspirations. In 2005, she explained in an interview with TV Zone magazine that she didn't want to commit to a series. She reflected, "If I'd gone on to do DS9, I might not have had the variety I've been lucky to have in my career... That's not to say I wasn't grateful for the opportunity; I genuinely was. However, I had to make a choice that felt right for me, which was a difficult one."

When Forbes reprised her role in "Picard," she shared on Instagram, "Ro taught me a lot. I've held those lessons close. She always stayed true to her word & beliefs. Always honest. Even if uncomfortable."

Persis Khambatta's Ilia went from series regular to redshirt

A revival of "Star Trek" was a touch-and-go thing throughout the 70s. Many attempts proved stillborn before Paramount chose to reboot the property as a TV series to anchor its proposed fourth U.S. TV network. That series, simply called "Star Trek II" (what most people call "Phase II"), sought to bring back the entire OG cast, and all agreed except Leonard Nimoy. Joining them were three new regulars: Commander Decker (uncast for the series); Spock-replacement Lt. Xon (David Gautreaux); and navigator Lt. Ilia, a "Deltan" with empathic powers and superior mathematical ability.

The writers scripted several episodes that would feature Ilia as a major character, including "The Child," which would later be repurposed for "TNG." The studio cast the plum role with former Femina Miss India, Persis Khambatta. But the network failed to materialize. A hasty decision to repurpose the two-hour pilot script as a feature resulted in "Star Trek: The Motion Picture." Xon became superfluous after Nimoy agreed to return as Spock, and Decker and Ilia were loose ends fated to be the sacrificial lambs at the climax because heaven forbid that Kirk, Spock, and McCoy evolve into a higher life form.

Sherilyn Connelly's excellent biography "Presenting Persis Khambatta" reveals that the actress wasn't heartbroken. The process of filming had been arduous and disagreeable, and individuals unable to see beyond Ilia's bald head had hindered her career.

Wil Wheaton got the message, and left

Wil Wheaton's portrayal of the "wunderkind" character Wesley Crusher faced substantial backlash, with some viewers labeling him a "Mary Sue" figure. Though challenging for the young actor, it wasn't the primary reason for his eventual departure from the show.

Wheaton explained , "Here's the absolute truth why I left 'Star Trek': I left 'Star Trek' because it was seriously interfering with my career in feature films." Commitments to the series had forced him to turn down several movie roles. The breaking point came when director Miloš Forman expressed interest in casting him for his 1989 film "Valmont." However, the "TNG" team wouldn't write Wesley out of the first scheduled episode of Season 3 or adjust the production order to accommodate the film's shooting schedule. Wheaton was told the first episode of the season focused entirely on Wesley. "I said, 'Well, this really sucks, but I'm under contract to you guys and if that's your call and if that's what you say I have to do, I have to do.' I had to pass on the movie."

But that wasn't the end of it. The production order of the first two episodes got flipped, and Wesley played an insignificant in the first segment. "The message was, "We own you. Don't you ever try to do anything without us," said Wheaton. That message drove him to leave the series, though he eventually made a few visits as a special guest star.

Paramount made Kirstie Alley an offer she could refuse

Newcomer Kirstie Alley made a striking impression in the supporting yet memorable role of Lt. Saavik in "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan." Fans expressed disappointment when she chose not to reprise the character for "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock." The reason? Recall the iconic line from Paramount's classic "The Godfather," "I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse"? Well, the studio's offer to Alley was one she could, and did, refuse. Alley was taken aback by the studio's lowball offer. "You're not paying as much as the first one, and it's a bigger role? It just didn't make sense to me," Alley remarked . "Why would you offer someone less money for a bigger role?'"

With Paramount standing firm, Alley decided to move on, and Robin Curtis assumed the unenviable task of replacing her, which she did to mixed results and mixed reviews. For "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country," director Nick Meyer envisioned Saavik as the traitor among the crew. For a variety of reasons, it didn't work out. Instead of recasting Saavik again, Meyer introduced Lt. Valeris (Kim Cattrall).

Unlike Saavik at Spock's funeral, Alley shed no tears over losing the part, transitioning to a successful career in numerous hit films and TV series, including the Paramount-produced classic "Cheers." Alley passed away on December 5, 2022. 

Terry Farrell was just worn out

The typical contract for regulars on a TV series is six years, and if a show is lucky enough to continue beyond that all the cast contracts must be renegotiated. Actors on a successful series are in a better position to ask for more money or other concessions. Such was the case for the cast of "DS9" during Season 6. In particular, Terry Farrell, who played the role of Jadzia Dax, sought to challenge the status quo.

Specifically, she wanted to step back from a starring role to that of a recurring character who didn't appear in every episode. "I was just really tired. I was tired of waking up at four in the morning. I was tired of all the minutiae," Farrell explained . But no new deal was forthcoming, and the producers decided to "fridge" Jadzia and replace her with a new character.

Despite her desire for a break, Farrell didn't get one. She performed Jadzia's death scene for "DS9" one day, and tested for the Paramount-produced comedy "Becker" the next. She subsequently co-starred on "Becker" for several seasons until, ironically, she was let go from that show.

Jennifer Lien was reluctantly released

"Star Trek: Voyager" featured controversial characters in Neelix (Ethan Phillips) and Kes (Jennifer Lien), mainly due to the peculiar dynamic of their relationship. Kes was a two-year-old Ocampa with a nine-year lifespan. She was romantically involved with middle-aged Neelix, raising eyebrows among fans. As the show progressed, writers struggled with both Lien's Kes and Garrett Wang's Lt. Kim, and by Season 3 both were on the chopping block . Kim was spared when Wang was named one of "People" magazine's " 50 Most Beautiful People in the World ." Kes was not so fortunate.

Lien's mental health was also a concern. As related in the book "Star Trek: Voyager — A Celebration" by Ben Robinson and Mark Wright, the cast and crew realized Lien was dealing with personal issues. "We knew that there was something going on," co-creator Jeri Taylor said, "but she wouldn't talk or let us offer to help."

Kes exited in the second episode of Season 4. Lien landed a few film roles and performed occasional voice acting work, but by 2002 made a decisive departure from acting. Sadly, her mental health appears to have suffered further, and, in the mid-2010s, she was arrested for several crimes. Many of those charges were later dropped.

Grace Lee Whitney was cut for cost... and worse

Even before "Star Trek" premiered in September 1966, Grace Lee Whitney's character, Yeoman Janice Rand, had been written out of the show.

Whitney addressed the topic in her memoir " The Longest Trek: My Tour of the Galaxy ," in which she candidly admitted having been a victim of sexual assault. The culprit was someone at Desilu Studios she identified only as "The Executive." Whitney believed she'd been let go because the perpetrator didn't want her around as a constant reminder of what he'd done. But it was budget considerations that led to the decision to drop her. In late August 1966, casting director Joe D'Agosta penned a memo discussing cast costs. Whitney was one of the highest-paid supporting cast members, but underutilized. D'Agosta recommended her deal be renegotiated, or the character dropped or recast. This was just before the assault.

Roddenberry always regretted cutting Rand from the show. Less than two months after her dismissal, Roddenberry issued a memo concerning the possibility of bringing Whitney back in a guest capacity. But Rand would remain MIA on "Trek" until the "Star Trek: The Motion Picture." She also cameoed in movies "III," "IV," and "VI" and, finally, in the "Voyager" episode "Flashback."

At the end of her life, Whitney (who died in 2015) had long since made peace with the events, and even said as much to this author over lunch in 2012. That's what you might call a grace note.

Diana Muldaur called Star Trek: The Next Generation “Off-Broadway”

By rachel carrington | jul 5, 2023.

LAS VEGAS, NV - AUGUST 10: Actress Diana Muldaur participates in the 11th Annual Official Star Trek Convention - day 2 held at the Rio Suites and Hotel on August 10, 2012 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images)

Diana Muldaur replaced Gates McFadden on the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Unfortunately, the fans didn’t take to the new character of Dr. Katherine Pulaski as she came across as abrasive and treated Data like a child. Though Pulaski was meant to resemble Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy’s character, it didn’t suit her or the other actors she was working with. And, apparently, that was just fine with Muldaur, as she told Mark A. Altman and Edward Gross, the writers of The Fifty-Year Mission—The Next 25 Years , [pp. 151-153] that, since her time on the show, she pretends she wasn’t in it and that she was just a guest person.

But that’s not all the former Star Trek: The Original Series actress had to say about her time as Dr. Pulaski. Not only did she tell the writers she was making more money and had better billing than the rest of the cast, but she had quite a few scathing words to say about that cast.

"“You just feel it from people who really hadn’t done anything else who were a little insecure. I did everything I could to make everyone feel secure and work well.”"

Diana Muldaur said the original Star Trek was like doing a nice Broadway play.

The Next Generation , on the other hand, was Off-Broadway to her. She said everyone was trying to be somebody rather than letting go and acting wonderfully, adding that if there was any tension, it had nothing to do with her, but them.

Though Muldaur said she wouldn’t have stayed beyond season two, there was a lot she loved about working on the series. And she does think the cast of L.A. Law, who she said offered a lot of snobbery about her time on the series, would be jealous if they knew the residuals Muldaur made from The Next Generation.

Still, the actress made it quite clear she wasn’t a big fan of the directors or much of the cast really.

"“The directors were all kids, who had just come over from the old country and didn’t know what they were doing. It was not a great creative mix of people and directors.”"

She further clarified that her time on the show wasn’t working out, but it had nothing to do with her. Then added that she “loved being part of it.”  Everything else she said certainly speaks to the contrary.

Next. Watch: 10 most hated Star Trek characters. dark

Star Trek: The Next Generation - Why Diana Muldaur's Katherine Pulaski Left After Season 2

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Season 2 of Star Trek: The Next Generation   brought a brand new doctor to the USS Enterprise. The first season said goodbye to two of the main women leads. Tasha Yar's death spelled the end of Denise Crosby's regular appearance on the show, but Dr. Beverly Crusher's transfer to head of Starfleet Medical meant there was room for a new doctor on board in Diana Muldaur's Katherine Pulaski.

Gates McFadden, who played the original Doctor Beverly Crusher, had left the show after the first season . The producers brought in Diana Muldaur to play a different type of doctor named Katherine Pulaski. Dr. Pulaski had previously served as chief medical officer on board the starship USS Repulse and held the rank of commander. Despite her rank and service record, she was not a bridge officer like her predecessor, Dr. Crusher.

Related:  Star Trek Theory: Picard Had a Secret Son - and People HATED Him

Pulaski brought a new vibe to the medical bay. While Dr. Crusher was often defined by her role as a mother and consulted for advice on social and emotional matters just as often as medical ones, Dr. Pulaski was calculating and detached. Creator Gene Roddenberry had wanted her to emulate some of the stand-out characteristics of Dr. McCoy from  The Original Series , including a fear of teleporters and a mistrust of the overly-logical members of the crew. In an interview for StarTrek.com , Muldaur says this is how she had wanted to play her  Star Trek doctor.

But Dr. Pulaski only stayed on  Star Trek: The Next Generation for a single season. The character was deemed a "failed experiment" -- not only did they never find the chemistry between Dr. Pulaski and the other crew members aboard the Enterprise , but the character herself never fully coalesced. Perhaps reaching backward for gimmicks that had worked in past eras led to a character defined by uncomfortable traits.

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Muldaur was not offered a renewal of her contract after the second season, but it turns out that she wasn't particularly interested in continuing on as Dr. Pulaski. She had never intended on staying on longer than one season, and this clinched the deal. Having previously acted on the character-based  The Original Series , Muldaur found  The Next Generation too reliant on technology and setting to hold much interest for her.

Muldaur had also landed a role on  L.A. Law , in part based upon her performance in the Pulaski-centric "Unnatural Selection" episode of  Star Trek: The Next Generation . This episode showcased Muldaur's acting chops as her character sought to find a cure for an illness that was causing her to rapidly age. Muldaur submitted this episode as part of her audition for  L.A. Law , suggesting that even if  The Next Generation wasn't exactly her taste, she was still giving it her all and reaping rewards from the series.

Diana Muldaur's Katherine Pulaski was a hard pivot from the previous  The Next Generation doctor Beverly Crusher. Despite referencing the style of the successful Dr. McCoy, her character's failure to mesh with the rest of the crew coupled with the actor's ambivalence about the show and other offers led to Pulaski's eventual departure . What few suspected, however, was that Pulaski would be replaced by Dr. Crusher, the character she had in turn replaced, ending her tenure on the show with a return to the original cast.

Keep Reading:  Star Trek: How Picard Could Redeem The Next Generation's Most-Hated Character

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Star Trek (TV Series)

Return to tomorrow (1968), diana muldaur: ann mulhall, thalassa, photos .

Leonard Nimoy, William Shatner, DeForest Kelley, and Diana Muldaur in Star Trek (1966)

Quotes 

Thalassa : Oblivion together does not frighten me, beloved.

Thalassa : [in Dr. Mulhall's body]  Can robot lips do this?

[Kisses Sargon in Captain Kirk's body] 

Thalassa : Doctor, would you like to save your Captain Kirk?

Dr. McCoy : But you said that was impossible.

Thalassa : We have many powers Sargon did not permit us to use. He thought them too tempting to us. This body pleases me; I intend to keep it.

Dr. McCoy : I see. And Henoch intends to keep Spock's body, of course.

Thalassa : Henoch's plans are his own affair. I wish only to exist in peace as a living woman.

Dr. McCoy : If you're asking my approval...

Thalassa : I require only your silence. Now only you and I will know that Dr. Mulhall has not returned to her body. Isn't that worth your captain's life? Doctor, we can take what we wish: Neither you nor this ship nor all your worlds have the power to stop us.

Dr. McCoy : Neither Jim nor I can trade a body we don't own. It happens to belong to a young woman...

Thalassa : Who you hardly know - almost a stranger to you.

Dr. McCoy : I will not peddle flesh. I'm a physician.

Thalassa : A physician? In contrast to what we are you are a prancing, savage medicine man. You dare defy one you should be on your knees worshiping? I could destroy you with a single thought.

[Painful energy field engulfs the doctor, then stops] 

Thalassa : Stop. Sargon was right, the temptations within a living body are too great. Forgive me.

Capt. Kirk : When Sargon and I exchanged, as we passed each other, for an instant, we were one. I know him now. I know what he is and what he wants, and I don't fear him.

Dr. McCoy : That's the most ridiculous statement I've ever heard. An alien practically hijacks your body and then corks you into a bottle, and you...

Ann Mulhall : [interrupting]  I'm afraid that I must agree with Dr. McCoy. You could be suffering from a form of... of false euphoria.

Capt. Kirk : That's twice you referred to us as "my children."

Sargon : Because it is possible you are our descendants, Captain Kirk. Six thousand centuries ago, our vessels were colonizing this galaxy, just as your own starships have now begun to explore that vastness. As you now leave your own seed on distant planets, so we left our seed behind us. Perhaps your own legends of an Adam and an Eve were two of our travelers.

Ann Mulhall : Our beliefs and our studies indicate that life on our planet Earth evolved independently.

Mr. Spock : That would tend, however, to explain certain elements of Vulcan prehistory.

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  • Star Trek Series | 2364 - 2378
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation

so THATS why some of the cast didn't like Diana Muldaur

  • Thread starter Borjis
  • Start date Oct 15, 2012

Borjis

  • Oct 15, 2012

she got paid more. (click on the next gen segment) http://emmytvlegends.org/interviews/people/diana-muldaur#  

  • Oct 16, 2012

Wonder why she said Gene died between 2nd and 3rd seasons when he in fact died a couple years afterwards? Honest mistake? Still a good interview though.  

Fleet Captain

dg1379 said: Wonder why she said Gene died between 2nd and 3rd seasons when he in fact died a couple years afterwards? Honest mistake? Still a good interview though. Click to expand...

ALF

Rear Admiral

Wasn't there some sort of Roddenberry clause in contracts for his actresses-turned-comfort-women?  

Dream

Diana Muldaur didn't want to sign a standard five seasons contract with TNG, so they let her leave her and brought back Gates McFadden. The producers REALLY didn't want three different CMDs for the first three seasons.  

Vanyel

The Imperious Leader

I also don't buy her "there was nothing creative about it" after Roddenberry died. Season 3 marked the beginning of TNG's best episodes.  

Seven of Five

Seven of Five

Stupid sexy flanders.

I wonder if she even watched the show, being as she was a little mixed up over when he died? It's a really nice interview on the whole though. I really appreciated Pulaski in season two, and have ever since read very little about Diane Muldaur's time on the show. Or before and after, for that matter. Well, whatever I have read or watched has only left positive vibes. It wasn't her fault she was paid more, or that she replaced Gates McFadden in the first place.  

  • Oct 17, 2012
Seven of Five said: It wasn't her fault she was paid more Click to expand...

T'Girl

T'Girl

Vice admiral.

Dream said: The producers REALLY didn't want three different CMDs for the first three seasons. Click to expand...
Dream said: Seven of Five said: It wasn't her fault she was paid more Click to expand...
Good point! I just meant that she didn't want to be tied down for several ears, hence the Guest Star contract. But the rest of the TNG cast ended up being paid more in the end after seven seasons (six for McFadden) and also four movies. Click to expand...
But the rest of the TNG cast ended up being paid more in the end after seven seasons (six for McFadden) and also four movies. Click to expand...

tomalak301

Fleet Admiral

One thing I really want to know is if she was ever asked to return later in the series' run. I just think what a missed opportunity it would have been to see Pulaski and Crusher match wits in Season 5's "Ethics". I know she didn't like her time with Season 2, but Crosby didn't like her time during Season 1 and she returned 6 times (Yesterday's Enterprise, The Minds Eye, the two Redemption Episodes, and the Unification 2 parter).  

I love Gates McFadden, but Diana Muldaur's Pulaski really clicked for me. I would have been happy having her around in some capacity for the entire series run.  

EmperorTiberius

EmperorTiberius

Rainbow Dash said: I love Gates McFadden, but Diana Muldaur's Pulaski really clicked for me. I would have been happy having her around in some capacity for the entire series run. Click to expand...

lurok

Glad there are other Muldaur/Pulaski fans. I find McFadden (infact most of TNG) dull.  

Maab of the Ten Tribes

Maab of the Ten Tribes

Pulaski was a kind of throw back to McCoy. I liked that about her character. Plus I liked the tie-in with having an actress who was tied to the original series. I would have liked her to have had another couple of seasons to grow.  

Worf's Beard

Worf's Beard

I actually liked Pulaski's character. There was something a bit grating about her character that I actually appreciated. I have no problem with Beverley Crusher in the show, but it was good to see Pulaski brought in because I did find season one's Crusher a bit bland (she improved in later seasons).  

Maab of the Ten Tribes said: Pulaski was a kind of throw back to McCoy. I liked that about her character. Plus I liked the tie-in with having an actress who was tied to the original series. I would have liked her to have had another couple of seasons to grow. Click to expand...

CorporalCaptain

CorporalCaptain

EmperorTiberius said: Maab of the Ten Tribes said: Pulaski was a kind of throw back to McCoy. I liked that about her character. Plus I liked the tie-in with having an actress who was tied to the original series. I would have liked her to have had another couple of seasons to grow. Click to expand...
Conscious Circuits said: EmperorTiberius said: Maab of the Ten Tribes said: Pulaski was a kind of throw back to McCoy. I liked that about her character. Plus I liked the tie-in with having an actress who was tied to the original series. I would have liked her to have had another couple of seasons to grow. Click to expand...

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Giant Freakin Robot

Giant Freakin Robot

The Most Beloved Classic Star Trek Story Is A Secret Mirror Universe Episode

Posted: July 9, 2024 | Last updated: July 9, 2024

diana muldaur star trek original series

For Star Trek fans, one of the most fascinating concepts is the Mirror Universe, an entire alternate reality where almost everything and everyone is twisted and evil. In a fun parallel of the classic nature versus nurture debate, many fans have wondered if this other universe has always been so immoral or if there might have been a single incident in the past that led to characters like Captain Kirk becoming so drastically different.

That has led to the enticing theory that the survival of Edith Keeler in The Original Series episode “City On the Edge of Forever” could have created the Mirror Universe.

diana muldaur star trek original series

City On The Edge Of Forever

It’s not a perfect theory (more on that later), but for us to explain it, we must first provide a brief recap of “City On the Edge of Forever.” This was the episode where Dr. McCoy was accidentally injected with drugs and went a bit crazy, hopping through the Guardian of Forever and ending up in the distant past. While there is no explicit mention of the Mirror Universe, his actions in the past create a different reality, one where the Enterprise no longer exists.

<p>Let’s cut right to it: what makes “City On the Edge of Forever” the best Star Trek episode for fans who appreciate great sci-fi? For one thing, this is one of the franchise’s first (and still its best) portrayals of an alternate history, making it a great episode for those who enjoy such novels as the Philip K. D***’s The Man In the High Castle. </p><p>That novel imagines a world where the Axis won World War II, and that’s the exact future that McCoy accidentally causes and that Kirk will do anything to prevent.</p>

Ignoring The Rules Of Back To The Future

Kirk and Spock end up heading through the Guardian to find their friend, and most of “City On the Edge of Forever” focuses on their misadventures in Great Depression-era New York City.

Kirk ends up falling in love with a soup kitchen worker named Edith Keeler, but Spock discovers something devastating: Keeler was supposed to die in a traffic accident, but in their altered future reality, she lived long enough to start a pacifist movement that delayed America from entering World War II, allowing the Germans to develop the atomic bomb first, win the war, and take over the world.

<p>I’m going to delve into some spoilers now, but another reason “City On the Edge of Forever” is great for sci-fi fans is that it never loses sight of its humanity. Some sci-fi can be colder than I’d like (looking at you here, Asimov), and I think the best sci-fi novels are ones with very human and relatable characters (The Handmaid’s Tale and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy are tonally very different but both exemplify this). </p><p>In this Star Trek episode, everything comes down to an awful decision Kirk must make, one that both humanizes and haunts this iconic character.</p>

Branching Paths

This culminates in the most horrific moment in “City On the Edge of Forever:” Dr. McCoy has recovered from the drugs and tries to save Edith Keeler from an oncoming truck. Kirk holds him back, allowing the love of his life to die in order to save the future as he knows it. He is successful, but some fans think that the Mirror Universe is an alternate timeline caused by Keeler living and the Nazis winning World War II.

Certainly, that would explain much of the aggression in the Mirror Universe, a reality where Zefram Cochrane initiated first contact by murdering Earth’s first Vulcan visitors and looting their technology.

An explicit Nazi backstory would also explain why the Terran Empire was obsessed with a kind of racial purity in which humans had to be superior to aliens. And the Nazis’ nasty history of experimenting on their enemies might explain why this alternate reality has perfected agonizer technology for so efficiently torturing enemies.

Evil Captain Kirk in the Star Trek: <a>TOS</a> episode “Mirror,mirror

The Start Of The Mirror Universe

With that being said, whether “City On the Edge of Forever” quietly explains how the Mirror Universe began has never been confirmed by the franchise. There is some strong circumstantial evidence: one interpretation of Captain Archer’s comment that the Empire had been around for “centuries” is that it began in 1955, which would be in line with the Nazis winning the war and beginning what would become an intergalactic empire.

But in Discovery, Terran Emperor Georgiou makes it sound like humans stopped being compassionate “a millennia ago,” and Enterprise highly implies that Terran traditions stretch all the way back to the other universe’s Roman Empire.

<p>Your mileage may vary, of course, but as a sci-fi nerd myself, I enjoy stories where characters must balance their personal morality with high-stakes decisions. In choosing to let Keeler (who, incidentally, he had fallen in love with) die in order to save the future, Kirk’s decision reminds me of other sci-fi icons and their own hard decisions. </p><p>In this moment, he is Winston Smith in 1984 betraying Julia–at the same time, he is John in Brave New World, choosing a life of unhappiness rather than everyone else’s vapid fantasies.</p><p>Obviously, taste is subjective, and there are probably some sci-fi fans who wouldn’t grok “City On the Edge of Forever” because it’s less about technology and more about history and humanity. </p><p>However, those are the episode’s greatest strengths, and focusing on these qualities has created some of the best sci-fi stories ever made. </p><p>In fact, I’ll go a step further: by watching this legendary Star Trek episode, you won’t just get a great story–you’ll get a narrative that has charmed and influenced some of your favorite sci-fi writers, inspiring them to create their own timeless tales. </p>

Expect A Future Series To Explain It All

Does that mean that “City On the Edge of Forever” definitively didn’t set up the Mirror Universe? Not exactly: after all, this is a franchise that is constantly retconning what we know about that other universe, with Discovery introducing the strange idea that everyone there hates bright lights. We might yet get a retcon linking the classic episode with this evil universe, but until that happens, this is one fan theory that needs a little more time in the oven–er, replicator.

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IMAGES

  1. Diana Muldaur Star Trek Original Series

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  2. Diana Muldaur Star Trek Original Series

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  3. Star Trek (1966)

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  4. Star Trek 2 x 20 "Return to Tomorrow " Diana Muldaur as Dr Ann Mulhall

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  5. Diana Muldaur Star Trek Original Series

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  6. Diana Muldaur Star Trek Original Series

    diana muldaur star trek original series

VIDEO

  1. Dr. Pulaski Loves Will Riker's Dad

  2. The Problem With Mudd's Women

  3. Sad😭News! Diana Muldaur Three Intriguing Star Trek Characters ! Heart Breaking 😭 News!Shocked!

  4. STAR TREK: Is There In Truth No Beauty?

  5. Why Does Everybody Hate Dr. Pulaski?

  6. La Vida y El Triste Final de Diana Muldaur

COMMENTS

  1. Diana Muldaur

    Diana Muldaur (born August 19, 1938) is an American film and television actress. Muldaur's television roles include Rosalind Shays on L.A. Law and Dr. Katherine Pulaski in the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation.She appeared in two episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series in the late 1960s, playing the roles (Dr. Miranda Jones and Ann Mulhall).

  2. Diana Muldaur

    Diana Muldaur (born 19 August 1938; age 85) is an actress, best known to Star Trek fans for her portrayal of Doctor Katherine Pulaski during the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. She appeared in all but two episodes of the season: "The Outrageous Okona" and "Q Who". Muldaur had previously appeared in two episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series ("Return to Tomorrow" and "Is ...

  3. "Star Trek" Return to Tomorrow (TV Episode 1968)

    Return to Tomorrow: Directed by Ralph Senensky. With William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Diana Muldaur. The Enterprise is guided to a distant, long-dead world where survivors of an extremely ancient race - existing only as disembodied energy - desiring the bodies of Kirk, Spock and astro-biologist Ann Mulhall so that they may live again.

  4. "Star Trek" Is There in Truth No Beauty? (TV Episode 1968)

    Is There in Truth No Beauty?: Directed by Ralph Senensky. With William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Diana Muldaur. Lovely telepath Miranda is aide to Ambassador Kollos, in a box to stop insanity when humans see Medusans. She rejects Larry, a designer of Enterprise, and senses murderous intent nearby.

  5. Looking Back at Her Star Trek Legacy with Diana Muldaur

    Diana Muldaur portrayed Dr. Katherine Pulaski during the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation, temporarily replacing Gates McFadden's Dr. Beverly Crusher (McFadden was let go at the end of the first season).This was not her first foray into Trek, having appeared on Star Trek: The Original Series as Dr. Ann Mulhall, in the second season episode "Return to Tomorrow," and as Dr ...

  6. Diana Muldaur

    Diana Muldaur. Series: TOS, TNG. Roles: Science Officer Dr. Ann Mulhall (TOS), Dr. Miranda Jones (TOS), Dr. Katherine Pulaski (TNG) In 1968, she appeared in the original Star Trek episodes "Return to Tomorrow" (as Science Officer Dr. Ann Mulhall), and in "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" as Dr. Miranda Jones.

  7. Diana Muldaur

    Diana Muldaur. Actress: McCloud. Diana Muldaur is known for L.A. Law (1986), Star Trek: The Next Generation, McCloud, Born Free, The Other and McQ. In the eighties, Diana became the president of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (the academy handing out the Emmy awards). Diana's L.A. Law character, Rosalind Shays, was a widely discussed character in the nineties.

  8. Diana Muldaur's 3 Star Trek TOS & TNG Characters Explained

    In Star Trek: The Original Series' "Return to Tomorrow," Diana Muldaur's Dr. Ann Mulhall joins Captain Kirk, Spock (Leonard Nimoy), and Dr. Leonard McCoy (DeForest Kelley) as part of an away team where they encounter a powerful, god-like being named Sargon (voiced by James Doohan). Sargon and his two companions, Henoch and Thalassa, had survived the destruction of their planet and had stored ...

  9. Catching Up With Diana Muldaur, Part 2

    Diana Muldaur is a most-formidable woman, and many of her best characters over the years have shared that same trait.Two, of course, immediately spring to mind: Dr. Katherine Pulaski on Star Trek: The Next Generation and Rosalind Shays on L.A. Law.Crafting those ladies, Muldaur brilliantly meshed an icy-cool demeanor, smarts, a certain sense of style and - more with Dr. Pulaski than Shays ...

  10. Is There in Truth No Beauty? (episode)

    When Jessica Walter, the original actress proposed for the role of Dr. Miranda Jones, became unavailable and a search for a replacement was fruitless, director Ralph Senensky recommended Diana Muldaur for the role, since they'd worked together the previous season in "Return to Tomorrow" and also in an episode of I, Spy. According to Senensky ...

  11. Return to Tomorrow

    "Return to Tomorrow" is the twentieth episode of the second season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek. Written by John T. Dugan (under the pen-name "John Kingsbridge") and directed by Ralph Senensky, it was first broadcast February 9, 1968.. In the episode, telepathic aliens take control of Captain Kirk, Dr. Ann Mulhall (Diana Muldaur), and First Officer Spock's bodies ...

  12. Is There in Truth No Beauty?

    "Is There in Truth No Beauty?" is the fifth episode of the third season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek. Written by Jean Lisette Aroeste and directed by Ralph Senensky, it was first broadcast on October 18, 1968.. In the episode, the Enterprise travels with an alien ambassador whose appearance induces madness.. This episode was the second appearance of Diana Muldaur ...

  13. Diana Muldaur World: Star Trek

    Long before she played Dr. Katherine Pulaski in Star Trek: The Next Generation, Diana Muldaur did two guest appearances in Star Trek: The Original Series.Her first role in Star Trek: TOS, Dr. Ann Mulhall, served as an astrobiologist aboard the USS Enterprise.Diana's second role in TOS, Dr. Miranda Jones, was a blind telepath.Miranda is regarded among the fans as one of Diana's best guest ...

  14. Whatever Happened to Diana Muldaur, Doctor Pulaski From Star Trek: The

    Star Trek fans will remember Diana Muldaur for her role as Dr. Katherine Pulaski on Star Trek: The Next Generation during the show's second season in 1988-1989. ... Muldaur's association with "Star Trek" began in the late 1960s when she appeared in two episodes of "Star Trek: The Original Series," portraying two distinct characters ...

  15. 5 Ways Dr. Crusher Deserved Better On Star Trek: TNG

    Despite being a popular character with Star Trek: The Next Generation fans, Dr. Beverly Crusher was replaced in TNG season 2 by Dr. Katherine Pulaski (Diana Muldaur).With a harsher bedside manner than Crusher, Pulaski was meant to channel the personality of Dr. Leonard McCoy (DeForest Kelley) from Star Trek: The Original Series.However, this dynamic didn't work as well on TNG, and Pulaski ...

  16. Diana Muldaur

    Diana Muldaur. Actress: McCloud. Diana Muldaur is known for L.A. Law (1986), Star Trek: The Next Generation, McCloud, Born Free, The Other and McQ. In the eighties, Diana became the president of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (the academy handing out the Emmy awards). Diana's L.A. Law character, Rosalind Shays, was a widely discussed character in the nineties.

  17. What is Diana Muldaur doing today? aka Katherine on Star Trek

    What is Diana Muldaur doing today? aka Katherine on Star Trek. • Diana Muldaur is an American actress from Brooklyn, New York born on 19 August 1938. • She has over 100 acting credits to her name, known best for her portrayal of Chris Coughlin in the action crime series "McCloud". • Her last TV series role before retiring from acting ...

  18. Why Did Diana Muldaur Leave 'Star Trek: The Next Generation'?

    Diana Muldaur appeared on two episodes of "The Original Series," and she played different roles. First, she guest-starred on the second season episode, " Return to Tomorrow ," as Ann Mulhall.

  19. This Actor Played More Star Trek Doctors On More Series Than Anyone Else

    Diana Muldaur as Dr. Jones. At first, you might think Star Trek having someone like Diana Muldaur play different roles so close together was just something they only did back in The Original Series, but this is a franchise tradition that is still alive and well to this day.

  20. Why These Star Trek Actors Really Left The Franchise

    How come Diana Muldaur, her replacement, endured only a single season? ... celebrated for their iconic portrayals of Sulu and Uhura in the original "Star Trek" series, triumphantly returned to ...

  21. Diana Muldaur called Star Trek: The Next Generation "Off-Broadway"

    Diana Muldaur said the original Star Trek was like doing a nice Broadway play. The Next Generation, on the other hand, was Off-Broadway to her. She said everyone was trying to be somebody rather than letting go and acting wonderfully, adding that if there was any tension, it had nothing to do with her, but them.

  22. Star Trek: Why Diana Muldaur's Katherine Pulaski Left After TNG ...

    Having previously acted on the character-based The Original Series, Muldaur found The Next Generation too reliant on technology and setting to hold much interest for her. Muldaur had also landed a role on L.A. Law, in part based upon her performance in the Pulaski-centric "Unnatural Selection" episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. This ...

  23. "Star Trek" Return to Tomorrow (TV Episode 1968)

    Six thousand centuries ago, our vessels were colonizing this galaxy, just as your own starships have now begun to explore that vastness. As you now leave your own seed on distant planets, so we left our seed behind us. Perhaps your own legends of an Adam and an Eve were two of our travelers.

  24. so THATS why some of the cast didn't like Diana Muldaur

    Admiral. Oct 16, 2012. #5. Diana Muldaur didn't want to sign a standard five seasons contract with TNG, so they let her leave her and brought back Gates McFadden. The producers REALLY didn't want three different CMDs for the first three seasons.

  25. The Most Beloved Classic Star Trek Story Is A Secret Mirror ...

    Kirk and Spock end up heading through the Guardian to find their friend, and most of "City On the Edge of Forever" focuses on their misadventures in Great Depression-era New York City.