The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ireland

  • Our Ministers

Please be advised that the Department of Foreign Affairs’ Travel Advice is now available at Ireland.ie/travel. Travel Advice on this webpage is no longer being updated. To ensure you receive the latest Travel Advice for Fiji , please see Ireland.ie .

If you’re travelling to Fiji, our travel advice and updates give you practical tips and useful information.

Security Status

  • Normal precautions
  • High degree of caution
  • Avoid non-essential travel
  • Do not travel

Safety and Security

Local laws and customs, natural disasters and climate, additional information, embassy contact, security status.

Normal Precautions

General Travel Advice

Irish citizens do not require a visa to enter Fiji for visits of up to 4 months. An onward or return ticket is required.

Business visitors will need to apply for a Business Visitors Permit  for a period of 21 days.

A valid passport is required for travel to Fiji. Irish passports should have a minimum validity of 6 months. Passport cards cannot be used.

For more information on visas and passports, please see the Additional Information tab.

Visitors to Fiji are advised to follow the guidance of national and local authorities and stay fully informed of what's going on by monitoring local news and social media.

Citizens can also follow the Embassy on social media (Twitter @ irlembaustralia and Facebook @ IrishEmbassyAustralia ) to ensure access to relevant updates and alerts.

Emergency Assistance

The best help is often close at hand so if you have problems, try talking to your local contacts, tour operator representative or hotel management.

You can contact the emergency services in Fiji by dialling 911. Specific emergency numbers are:

  • Police: 917
  • Fire brigade: 911
  • Ambulance: 911

Our tips for Safe Travels:

  • Get comprehensive travel insurance that covers all your planned activities.
  • Follow us on twitter  @dfatravelwise  for the latest travel updates.
  • Read our  ‘Know Before You Go’  guide.

As there is no Irish Embassy in Fiji, we are limited in the help we can offer you in an emergency. However, if you need assistance, you can contact the  Irish Embassy in Canberra, Australia .

Safety and security

Most Irish visitors to Fiji stay in resorts and these are generally very safe, however, petty crime, such as theft from hotel rooms is common.

If you intend to move outside resort areas, be aware of your surroundings and take additional precautions:

  • Don’t carry your credit card, travel tickets and money together - leave spare cash and valuables in a safe place. 
  • Don’t carry your passport unless absolutely necessary and leave a copy of your passport (and travel and insurance documents) with family or friends at home.
  • Lock your luggage as a sensible precaution against luggage tampering, including theft.
  • Significant numbers of foreign tourists are victims of violent robbery, particularly after dark in Suva and other towns. When you’re travelling, especially alone, take extra care, particularly if you’re visiting isolated locations.

Credit card fraud and ATM card skimming occur. Protect your PIN and be alert when using ATMs.

Lost or stolen passports

Given that the nearest Irish Embassy is a huge distance away in Canberra, Australia, dealing with a lost or stolen passport can be extremely inconvenient and can take time to resolve. In emergencies, you can get limited consular assistance from EU partners with Embassies in Suva.

Reporting crime

If you’re a victim of a crime while in Fiji, report it to the local police immediately. You can contact the  Irish Embassy in Canberra  if you need help.

If you’re planning to drive in Fiji, you should be extremely careful. Traffic discipline can be poor, roads are often badly lit and of poor quality and animals on the road are a hazard.  In particular, it’s dangerous to drive at night between Nadi and Suva. Severe weather can lead to roads becoming damaged, blocked or washed away. Seek local advice before you set out. If you want to drive, bring your full Irish driver’s licence and make sure you have adequate and appropriate insurance

Taxis/minibuses

When using taxis or mini buses, we advise you to use ones with yellow registration plates. This show that the vehicle recently complied with Land Transport Authority (LTA) regulations. Not all minibuses currently operating in Fiji are licensed by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) and unlicensed minibuses will probably not be insured.

Hiring a vehicle

If you’re hiring a vehicle, we advise you not to hand over your passport as a form of security. If you’re allowing your passport to be photocopied, keep it in your sight at all times.

Check that you have adequate insurance and read the small print of the vehicle hire contract (particularly any waiver that will come into effect if the vehicle is damaged).

Outdoor activities

Safety standards of tour operators in Fiji may not compare to Irish standards, especially for adventure sports (including diving) or on boats in coastal waters and between islands. There may not be enough life jackets for boats, rafts and kayaks. Check the operator’s credentials and safety equipment beforehand and make sure your travel insurance policy covers your planned activities.

Water sports

Be aware that there are dangerous riptides along many of Fiji’s reefs and river estuaries, so you should know what you’re dealing with before you get in the water. Always wear the appropriate safety equipment before going out to the reefs or engaging in water sports and take local advice on safety.

Local laws and customs

Remember, the local laws apply to you as a visitor and it is your responsibility to follow them. Be sensitive to local customs, traditions and practices as your behaviour may be seen as improper, hostile or may even be illegal.

Illegal drugs

Illegal drug use (no matter what the drug) carries stiff penalties, including fines and long prison terms. Possession of any amount of marijuana carries a mandatory three-month prison sentence.

You can be arrested for being drunk and disorderly. You can be fined and detained if you cause damage to property or assault police officers.

It’s illegal to be under the influence of alcohol while at an airport. Airline travellers who are intoxicated may be detained by police.

Local culture

You may be invited to take part in the local ceremony of drinking kava. Be aware that in rare cases, there are indications that this could have adverse effects on the liver.

Law enforcement

Topless bathing and nudity in public is forbidden.

Homosexuality in Fiji is legal. Nonetheless, discretion, and awareness of local sensitivities, is advised particularly when visiting rural communities.

Natural disasters and climate

The tropical cyclone season in Fiji normally runs from November to April, but cyclones can occur throughout the year. During this period there is a greater risk of strong winds, heavy rains, flooding, landslides and road closures.

Weather updates are available from  Fiji Meteorological Service  and can also be found in local newspapers and on Radio Fiji GOLD on 100.4 FM. The  National Disaster Management Office  has information on how to prepare. The direction and strength of tropical cyclones can change with little warning. The  Fiji Meteorological Service  provides up to date information about the weather conditions in Fiji and you can also get information from the  World Meteorological Organisation Severe Weather Information Centre   and Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System .

In the event of an approaching cyclone, you should identify your local shelter. Follow the instructions of local authorities and monitor the media for the latest developments. Carry your travel documents (ie passport, photo identification) or secure them in a safe, waterproof location. If possible, contact friends and family in Ireland with updates to let them know you’re safe.

Flights in and out of affected areas could be delayed or suspended and you should be aware that available flights may fill quickly. In some areas, adequate shelter from a severe cyclone may not be available to everyone who chooses to stay.

Earthquakes

Fiji is in an earthquake zone and suffers from tremors from time to time. These can trigger tsunami alerts. Familiarise yourself with safety procedures in the event of an earthquake, and take note of earthquake and tsunami-related instructions from your hotel or the local authorities.

Flash floods resulting in landslides and road blockages can happen throughout the year in the Fiji Islands. In periods of heavy rain, check with your tour operator or resort before travelling, particularly by road.

Additional information

Entry requirements (visa/passport).

Irish citizens can enter Fiji without a visa for up to 4 months but must:

  • Hold a passport valid at least six months on entry with one blank visa page
  • Hold proof of sufficient funds
  • Hold proof of onward/return airline tickets
  • Hold documents showing proof of purpose of trip
  • Hold all documents required for the next destination
  • Confirm with their airline that boarding will be permitted without a visa as these conditions are subject to change.

If you plan to stay for longer than 4 months, you will need to apply for a visa.

If you’re visiting Fiji on business you will be granted a  Business Visitors Permit  for a period of 21 days.

Yachts can only enter Fiji through Suva, Lautoka, Savusavu and Levuka. For other ports, such as Nadi/Denarau, prior arrangement with the Fijian Authorities is needed.

It’s advisable to take a number of photocopies of your passport with you. During your stay you should carry a photocopy of your passport at all times.

There are a high number of Leptospirosis cases nationwide. Stay away from flooded rivers or creeks, and wear footwear when outside. Monitor the Ministry of Health and Medical Services  website  and  Facebook page  for information and updates.

Cases of Typhoid, Zika and Dengue are current throughout Fiji. Protect yourself against mosquito bites.

Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary.

Meningococcal

According to the World Health Organisation, meningococcal can be highly fatal. Get vaccinated before you travel. Symptoms include high fever, sensitivity to light or nausea. Seek urgent medical advice if symptoms persist.  More information is available on the  Meningococcal meningitis fact sheet .

Medical facilities

Health care facilities in Fiji are adequate for routine medical treatment, but they are limited in range and may not be available in some regions. In the event of a medical emergency, evacuation could be a likely option for treatment, and you should make sure that your insurance policy covers this. Be aware that doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services.

Fiji is prone to dengue and Zika virus outbreaks. Infection with Zika virus has been increasingly linked with a serious birth condition called microcephaly where the baby is born with an abnormally small head and/or brain damage. An increase in cases of a neurological illness (called Guillan Barre Syndrome) have also been reported in areas where Zika virus outbreaks have occurred. Irish Citizens are advised to follow guidance available on the website of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) .

If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, and plan to travel to areas affected by the Zika Virus, you are advised to discuss your travel plans with your healthcare provider and to consider postponing your travel to affected areas.

Dengue fever

Outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses (including dengue fever and filariasis) are common, with more serious outbreaks occurring from time to time. Before travelling, get up-to-date medical advice as to whether you will need anti-malarial medication. When you arrive, avoid being bitten by mosquitoes by using bed nets and repellents, and wearing closed shoes, long sleeves and trousers.

Other illnesses

Water-borne, food-borne and other infectious diseases (including typhoid, hepatitis, leptospirosis, tuberculosis, measles and mumps) are common, with more serious outbreaks occurring from time to time. Fijian authorities have reported cases of typhoid in Suva and throughout the country.

We recommend that you boil all drinking water or drink bottled water, and avoid ice cubes, raw and undercooked food.

Before you go, organise a variety of ways to access your money overseas, such as credit cards, travellers' cheques, cash, debit cards or cash cards. Consult with your bank to find the most appropriate currency to carry and whether your ATM card will work.

Mobile phone coverage

The mobile phone network generally works well in cities and large towns but coverage in some rural areas and outlying islands can be limited or non-existent. This may result in you being out of contact with home for periods of time.

Embassy contact

If you require emergency assistance from the Embassy, please contact us on +61 2 62140000. If you call outside normal working hours, you will be given instructions to call another number to speak to a Duty Officer.

Embassy of Ireland 20 Arkana Street Yarralumla ACT 2600 Australia

Tel: +61 2 6214 0000 Fax: +61 2 6273 3741

Monday to Friday 9:30am – 12:30pm and 2pm – 4pm

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Get travel and medical insurance

Before travelling, the Department  strongly recommends  that you obtain comprehensive travel insurance which will cover all overseas medical costs, including medical repatriation/evacuation, repatriation of remains and legal costs. You should check any exclusions and, in particular, that your policy covers you for the activities you want to undertake.

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Latest update

Exercise a high degree of caution in Indonesia overall due to security risks.

Higher levels apply in some areas.

Indonesia

Indonesia (PDF 699.19 KB)

Asia (PDF 2.21 MB)

Local emergency contacts

Fire services, ambulance and rescue services, medical emergencies.

Call 110 or 112.

Tourist Police, Bali

Call (+0361) 759 687.

Tourist Police, Jakarta

Call (+201) 526 4073.

Advice levels

Exercise a high degree of caution in Indonesia overall.

Reconsider your need to travel to the provinces of Papua (Papua), Papua Highlands (Papua Pegunungan), Central Papua (Papua Tengah) and South Papua (Papua Selatan).

Reconsider your need to travel  to the provinces of Papua, Papua Pegunungan, Papua Tengah and Papua Selatan due to the risk of serious security incidents or demonstrations that may turn violent.

  • There's an ongoing risk of terrorist attack in Indonesia. Be alert to possible threats. Take official warnings seriously and follow the advice of local authorities. Popular tourist areas may be the target of terrorist attacks.
  • Public protests and events that draw large groups of people occur regularly and can turn violent with little notice. Expect traffic delays and restricted access to locations if there are protests. Avoid protests and demonstrations and monitor local media for the latest updates.
  • Many of Indonesia's volcanoes are active and can erupt without warning. Adhere to exclusion zones around volcanoes, which can change at short notice, and follow the advice of local authorities. Domestic and international flights can be disrupted. Monitor Indonesia's  Volcano Observatory Notice  for the latest volcanic activity (Bahasa Indonesia and English),  Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System  and the  Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre  for updates. 
  • There's been tension, including demonstrations and violence, in certain towns in the provinces of Papua,   Papua Pegunungan, Papua Tengah and Papua Selatan in recent years. Armed groups have stated that they're targeting foreigners, including Australians. Our ability to provide consular support in these provinces is limited. Armed groups have shot at aircraft, including commercial planes, in remote airports in Papua Pegunungan and Papua Tengah provinces.
  • Petty and violent crime occurs in Indonesia. Opportunistic crime, such as pickpocketing occurs. Drinks may be spiked or mixed with toxic substances. Crimes involving taxis and taxi drivers occur. Solo women are at higher risk. Be alert in taxis, public transport, crowds, bars and nightclubs.
  • Legal disputes over real estate are common, including in Bali. Before entering into an agreement or providing financial details, do your research and get legal advice.
  • Natural disasters such as severe weather, floods, landslides, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis occur regularly. Weather conditions can change quickly during the wet season (October – April). Regularly check weather reports, monitor media and speak to your travel provider before continuing with planned activities. Follow the advice of local authorities.
  • When undertaking adventure activities, ensure that functioning safety equipment is available, that you have travel insurance and that your policy covers you for these activities.

Full travel advice: Safety

  • The standard of medical facilities in Indonesia is generally lower than in Australia. Many regional hospitals only provide basic facilities.
  • Some medications, including prescription medications, drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all cannabis-based products including medicinal cannabis, cannabis-based oils and creams, hemp-based products, CBD, THC, hash and edibles, are illegal in Indonesia. Harsh penalties, such as arrest and jail time, can apply even if you have a prescription. Make sure your  medication is legal in Indonesia .
  • Purchasing prescription medication online or over the counter in Indonesia without an Indonesian prescription is illegal. Ensure you provide a valid prescription from an Indonesian doctor before purchasing prescription medication and confirm that it's accepted by the seller before your purchase.

Full travel advice: Health

  • Indonesia has revised its criminal code, which includes penalties for cohabitation and sex outside of marriage. These revisions will not come into force until January 2026.
  • Penalties for drug offences include heavy fines, long prison sentences and the death penalty. Police target tourist destinations. 
  • Some medications are illegal in Indonesia. Harsh penalties can apply even if you have a prescription. It is also illegal to purchase prescription medications online or over the counter without an Indonesian prescription. Ensure you have a valid Indonesian prescription. See ' Health '.

The death penalty exists for some crimes in Indonesia.

  • Standards of dress and behaviour are conservative in many parts of Indonesia. Learn about local customs. Take care not to offend.
  • Aceh province upholds aspects of sharia law. Sharia law applies to everyone, including travellers. Inform yourself about the laws, and be careful not to offend or break local laws. If in doubt, seek local advice.

Full travel advice: Local laws

  • The Bali Provincial Government has introduced a new tourist levy of IDR 150,000 per person to foreign tourists entering Bali. The tourist levy is separate from the e-Visa on Arrival or the Visa on Arrival. Cashless payments can be made online prior to travel or on arrival at designated payment counters at Bali's airport and seaport. See the  Bali Provincial Government's  official website and  FAQs  for further information.
  • If you're travelling to Indonesia for tourism, official government duties or business meetings, you can  apply for an e-Visa on Arrival (e-VOA)  online at least 48 hours before your travel to Indonesia. This also applies if you're transiting through Indonesia at international airports, seaports and land crossings. You can get a Visa on Arrival (VOA) at some international airports, seaports or land crossings.
  • To apply for the e-VOA or VOA, you must have an ordinary (non-emergency) passport with at least 6 months of validity from the date you plan to enter (we also recommend having at least 6 months of passport validity from the date you plan to leave Indonesia, to avoid any issues for your departure or onward travel) and a return or onward flight booking to another country.
  • You may need to apply for a visa in advance to enter Indonesia for purposes not covered by the e-VOA or VOA. Check the latest entry requirements with your travel provider or an  Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia  before travel. Entry, exit and transit conditions can change at short notice. Monitor media for the latest updates. 
  • You'll be required to complete an  e-customs declaration  for arrival. You can complete this within 3 days of departure to Indonesia.
  • Travel requirements may change at short notice, including travel to Bali and Jakarta by air, land or sea. Contact your travel provider and monitor media for up-to-date details.

Full travel advice: Travel

Local contacts

  • The Consular Services Charter tells you what the Australian Government can and can't do to help when you're overseas.
  • For consular help, contact the Australian Embassy, Jakarta , the Australian Consulate-General, Bali , the Australian Consulate-General, Makassar or the Australian Consulate-General, Surabaya .
  • To stay up to date with local information, follow the Embassy's social media accounts.

Full travel advice: Local contacts

Full advice

The terrorist threat in Indonesia is ongoing. Attacks could happen anywhere and anytime. This includes places that foreigners visit.

Be alert to possible threats. Take official warnings seriously and follow the advice of local authorities. Remain respectful of religious and local customs.

Indonesian authorities continue to investigate and disrupt terrorist groups in Indonesia, including Bali.

Terrorist attacks are motivated by extreme beliefs. Both local grievances as well as events in other parts of the world could motivate extremists in Indonesia towards violence.

Recent terrorist attacks

In December 2022, an explosion occurred at a police station in Bandung, Jawa Barat, killing 2 and injuring 11.

In March 2021, 2 suicide bombers attacked a church in Makassar, injuring dozens.

In the past, police have said that terrorist suspects remain at large and may seek Western targets.

Indonesian security agencies continue to conduct operations against terrorist groups.

Terrorists in Indonesia may carry out small-scale violent attacks with little or no warning.

Be alert in places of worship, especially during periods of religious significance.

Terrorists have targeted places of worship in:

As well as places of worship, other possible targets by terrorists include:

  • Indonesian government facilities, premises and symbols associated with the Indonesian Government
  • police stations and checkpoints
  • bars, nightclubs, cafes and restaurants
  • cinemas and theatres
  • shopping centres, public transport and transport hubs
  • airports and airlines
  • clubs, including sporting clubs
  • tourist areas and attractions, tour buses and tour groups
  • outdoor recreation events

Supporters have committed additional acts of violence in response to high-profile extremists being detained or killed.

To protect yourself during a terrorist attack:

  • leave the area as soon as it's safe
  • follow the advice of local authorities
  • don't gather in a group after an attack
  • don't gather in a group if you're evacuated from a building

Security remains at a high level at:

  • the Australian Embassy in Jakarta
  • the Consulates-General in Bali, Makassar and Surabaya

More information:

Civil unrest and political tension

Most events are announced before they happen; however, protests may occur with little or no notice.

Protests and events are often held near major government buildings and embassies in Jakarta, including the Australian Embassy.

Protests may also occur at any of Australia's Consulates-General in Surabaya, Bali and Makassar, at government buildings, or the offices of international organisations in Indonesia.

You can expect traffic delays and restricted access to locations if there are protests.

Phone or email ahead for an appointment before going to the Embassy or the Consulates-General (see  Local contacts ).

Demonstrations and acts of violence can happen when courts try and sentence extremists.

Conflict between different communities can sometimes occur, including in the provinces of Papua, Papua Pegunungan, Papua Tengah and Papua Selatan. Our ability to provide consular support in these provinces is limited.

Local violence can also be directed at minority groups in other parts of Indonesia, including in Java.

If you're found to endanger security or public order, you may be prosecuted under Indonesia's Immigration laws, which may result in imprisonment or deportation.

To protect yourself from possible violence:

  • avoid protests and demonstrations
  • monitor local media for the latest security updates
  • plan your activities to avoid potential unrest on significant dates
  • be prepared to change your travel plans
  • Demonstrations and civil unrest

Armed conflict

The provinces of Papua, Papua Pegunungan, Papua Tengah and Papua Selatan experience regular violent clashes involving armed groups, civilians, Indonesian police, and the military. Armed groups have stated that they are targeting foreigners, including Australians. Our ability to provide consular support in these provinces is limited.

Many people have been killed and injured in clashes. This includes members of security forces, armed groups and civilians. Violent attacks have occurred in several areas of these provinces, including in and around Jayapura. There's a risk of more attacks.

On 23 February 2023, a riot broke out in Wamena, Papua Pegunungan, when a crowd attacked Indonesian security personnel following the arrest of two people accused of child kidnapping. 12 civilians and rioters were killed.

Violent attacks have occurred around the Freeport Mine in Papua Tengah.

Armed groups have:

  • taken a New Zealand pilot hostage in Paro, Papua Pegunungan
  • shot at aircraft, including commercial planes, at Beoga airport in Pupua Tengah province and Nop Goliat Dekai airport in Papua Pegunungan province. 
  • killed people in attacks, including one Australian
  • attacked vehicles using the road between Grasberg and Timika
  • killed people in violent attacks in Puncak Jaya District, Papua Tengah
  • more attacks are possible and could target infrastructure and national institutions.

A range of crimes, including violent crime, occur in Indonesia. Crimes can happen in popular tourist locations in Bali.

To protect yourself from crime:

  • be aware of your surroundings
  • be alert in crowds
  • understand the potential crime risks

Theft, robbery  and bag and phone snatching have occurred. These crimes can sometimes involve violence. Opportunistic crime such as pickpocketing occurs.

Be careful of thieves:

  • on motorcycles targeting pedestrians
  • in upmarket shopping malls
  • in crowded public transport
  • at traffic lights targeting people in stopped cars
  • at bars and nightclubs
  • when entering accommodation, including villas in Bali

Keep bags and valuables out of sight in vehicles.

If you're travelling on foot, walk:

  • on footpaths
  • away from the curb
  • with your bag held away from traffic

Sexual assault

If you're a victim of sexual assault :

  • get immediate medical assistance. If you have any doubts about seeking medical assistance after a sexual assault, contact your nearest Australian Embassy or Consulate in Indonesia (see  Local contacts ) as quickly as possible.
  • make a full statement to local police, in person, so they can conduct a criminal investigation. You may wish to seek consular help before you visit the police station. Contact your nearest Australian Embassy or Consulate (see  Local contacts ).

Local police can only investigate a crime after you've left Indonesia if you've reported it.

Your sworn statement, or statements by witnesses, can be used as evidence in criminal court proceedings.

You don't always need to be in Indonesia for trial. Neither do witnesses who live outside of Indonesia.

Counselling support

Should you wish to speak to a counsellor, you can call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your nearest Australian Embassy or Consulate (see  Local contacts ). They can connect you to counselling hotlines and services.

  • Reducing the risk of sexual assault

Bars and nightclubs

Be alert in bars and nightclubs. Drink-spiking and snatching of valuables may occur if you're not alert.

Drinks may be contaminated with drugs or toxic substances. See  Health .

Don't leave your food or drinks unattended.

Never accept drinks, food, gum, cigarettes, vapes or e-cigarettes from people you've just met.

  • Partying safely

Credit card and ATM fraud

Credit card, online banking and ATM fraud occurs in Indonesia.

Check your bank statements.

Make sure your bank doesn't block your cards. Tell your bank you'll be visiting Indonesia.

Never let your card out of your sight. This includes when you pay in restaurants.

Shield your PIN from sight.

Some vendors install hidden cameras and use card skimmers.

Don’t click on unknown links in WhatsApp or mobile phone text messages, particularly if your phone is linked to mobile banking.

Use ATMs at controlled and secure places, such as:

  • shopping centres

Scams and confidence tricks

Beware of scams and confidence tricks.

Only exchange money at authorised money changers. Authorised money changers can also be found on the  Bali Foreign Exchange website . Unauthorised money changers have been known to scam foreign tourists in Bali and elsewhere.

All types of gambling are illegal in Indonesia.

Australians have lost large sums of money in card game scams run by organised gambling gangs, particularly in Bali. See Local laws

Some tourists have been robbed or planted with drugs after taking new acquaintances back to their hotel rooms. In some cases, their drinks were spiked.

Legal disputes over the purchase of real estate are common, including in Bali, involving:

  • holiday clubs and resorts
  • timeshare schemes

Before entering into an agreement or providing financial details:

  • thoroughly research the proposal
  • get legal advice and know your rights, especially before you sign any documents

Using taxis

Only use licensed official metered taxis. Crimes involving unregistered taxis include:

  • taxis departing before the passenger can take their baggage from the vehicle
  • taxi drivers robbing or temporarily holding passengers, including in urban areas
  • taxi drivers forcing passengers to withdraw money at ATMs before releasing them

Lone female travellers are at higher risk of crime.

If you're in an incident involving a taxi, leave the taxi and the immediate area if it's safe to do so.

To protect yourself from overcharging and scams:

  • only travel in licensed taxis with signage, a "taxi" roof sign and meters working
  • ensure the driver's identification card is visible
  • book via your phone, on an official taxi company mobile app, from inside an airport, or at stands at major hotels

See Travel .

Cyber security

You may be at risk of cyber-based threats during overseas travel to any country. Digital identity theft is a growing concern. Your devices and personal data can be compromised, especially if you're connecting to Wi-Fi, using or connecting to shared or public computers, or to Bluetooth.

Social media can also be risky in destinations where there are social or political tensions, or laws that may seem unreasonable by Australian standards. Travellers have been arrested for things they have said on social media. Don't comment on local or political events on your social media.

  • Cyber security when travelling overseas

Kidnapping occurs across the world with political, ideological and criminal motives. Foreigners, including Australians, have been kidnapped overseas while travelling. Kidnaps can happen anywhere, anytime, including destinations that are typically at lower risk. 

On 7 February 2023, a New Zealand pilot was taken hostage by an armed group in Paro, Papua Pegunungan.

The Australian Government's longstanding policy is that it doesn't make payments or concessions to kidnappers.

Adventure activities

Many businesses don't follow safety and maintenance standards. This includes transport and tour operators, water sports providers, hotels, restaurants and shops.

It may affect adventure activities, such as:

  • bungee jumping
  • scuba diving and snorkelling 
  • chairlift or gondola rides

In the past, Australians have been seriously injured or died while participating in adventure activities. If you require intensive care medical treatment, emergency surgery or medical evacuation. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs.

If you plan to do an adventure activity :

  • check if your travel insurance policy covers it
  • ask about safety, search and rescue procedures
  • ask about and insist on minimum safety requirements
  • always use available safety gear, such as life jackets or seatbelts
  • check with your travel provider on vessel capacity limits before embarking on sea, land or air travel
  • check weather and ocean conditions, and whether the vessel has had any mechanical issues, on the day and before continuing with water activities or sea travel
  • check where the nearest medical facilities are

If proper safety equipment isn't available or you're unsure of the provider's safety or maintenance procedures, use another provider.

Trekking and climbing

Some mountain treks suit only experienced climbers. Travel with a guide and check the level of difficulty beforehand.

Many trekking options may be on or around an active volcano. Many of Indonesia's volcanoes are active and can erupt without warning. Volcanic and seismic activity may continue for some time. Adhere to exclusion zones around volcanoes, which can change at short notice, and follow the advice of local authorities. If you're planning to travel to an area near an active volcano, check with local authorities before climbing and check:

  • Bureau of Meteorology  Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre  
  • MAGMA Indonesia  (Bahasa Indonesia) for daily updates on status and alert levels
  • National Disaster Management Authority (BNPB)  (Bahasa Indonesia)
  • Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System

Swimming safety

People have drowned in coastal areas, including in Bali, due to rough seas, strong currents, or from swimming, snorkelling or scuba diving in areas where there is frequent passage of boats, resulting in collisions.

Local beach rescue services may not be of the same standard as in Australia.

Saltwater crocodiles are in rivers throughout Indonesia. Avoid swimming around river estuaries and seek local advice in other locations. 

If you plan to spend time in or on the water:

  • regularly check weather reports as sea conditions can change rapidly
  • take warnings seriously
  • check media and local sources for information about potential dangers
  • speak to your travel provider about safety equipment and weather conditions before continuing with planned activities
  • take a friend or family member with you when you undertake swimming or water activities
  • be careful when swimming, snorkelling or scuba diving near motor-powered boats or where there is frequent passage of boats
  • ensure you have travel insurance and that your policy covers you for planned activities

Ensure you have travel insurance and that your policy covers you for planned activities.

Climate and natural disasters

Indonesia experiences natural disasters and severe weather , including:

  • landslides and mudslides
  • volcanic eruptions
  • earthquakes
  • storms resulting in turbulent sea conditions
  • tsunamis and high wave events

If there's a natural disaster or severe weather:

  • always carry your passport in a waterproof bag
  • keep in contact with family and friends
  • check the media and local sources for information
  • don't undertake sea, land or air travel if it's not safe to do so
  • Indonesian Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG)  (English and Bahasa Indonesia)
  • BMKG Multi-Hazard Early Warning System app  (English and Bahasa Indonesia) 

Floods and mudslides

Floods , landslides and mudslides occur regularly during the wet season from October to April, with some severe events resulting in injury, displacement, death or damaged infrastructure.

Heavy rains can cause significant flooding in urban areas, including the greater Jakarta region, causing disruption to transportation. Monitor the local media for updates.

Walking and driving in flooded areas can be dangerous. Flood waters may hide uncovered drainage ditches.

Volcanic activity may escalate with little or no notice, leading to flight disruptions and airport closures, including in surrounding provinces. Contact your airline for the latest flight information. 

There are 147 volcanoes in Indonesia. 76 of them are active volcanoes and could erupt at any time.

Volcanic alert levels and exclusion zones may rise quickly. You may be ordered to evacuate at short notice. Volcanic activity can disrupt domestic and international flights. There are 4 volcano alert levels in Indonesia; 1 - normal, 2 - advisory, 3 - watch, 4 - warning.

Before you travel to areas that are prone to volcanic activity, monitor media and ensure you read the Indonesian Government's latest advice on current volcanic activity, including:

  • Volcanic Activity Report  by Indonesia's Multiplatform Application for Geohazard Mitigation and Assessment (MAGMA) (Bahasa Indonesia)
  • Volcano Activity and Observatory Notices  (English and Bahasa Indonesia)
  • MAGMA Indonesia Map of Latest Volcano Levels and Climate Information  (Bahasa Indonesia)
  • Bureau of Meteorology's  Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre

If there's volcanic activity:

  • avoid the area
  • take official warnings seriously and adhere to exclusion zones
  • follow the instructions and advice of local authorities
  • follow evacuation orders
  • read our advice on Volcanic eruptions while travelling

Volcanic ash can cause breathing difficulties. The risk is higher for people with chronic respiratory illnesses, including:

Recent and frequent volcanic activity has included:

  • Mount Ile Lewetolok in East Nusa Tenggara (Nusa Tenggara Timur)
  • Mount Lewotobi Laki Laki in East Flores Regency, Nusa Tenggara Timur
  • Mount Marapi in West Sumatra
  • Mount Anak Krakatau, to the south of Sumatra
  • Mount Merapi, near Yogyakarta
  • Mt Dukono in North Sulawesi
  • Mount Semeru, near Malang, East Java
  • Mount Agung in Bali
  • Mount Sinabung in North Sumatra

Some trekking routes are on or near active volcanoes, including Mount Agung and Mount Batur in Bali, Mount Marapi in West Sumatra, Mount Merapi near Yogyakarta, Mount Rinjani in Lombok, Mount Bromo and Mount Ijen in East Java. See 'Trekking and climbing'.

If you're planning to travel to an area near an active volcano, make sure you have comprehensive travel insurance and check if any restrictions apply.

If a volcanic eruption occurs:

  • make a backup plan in case you're affected
  • contact your airline or travel insurer to confirm flight schedules and get help
  • keep in touch with family and friends
  • Learn more about  volcanic eruptions  (Geoscience Australia)
  • See practical advice and information about  volcanic eruptions  (US CDC)
  • See worldwide  volcanic activity reports  in real-time (GDACS)

Earthquakes

Indonesia is in an active earthquake region. It has a high level of earthquake activity, that sometimes triggers tsunamis.

There are approximately 4,000 earthquakes across Indonesia every year. Around 70 to 100 of these are over 5.5 magnitude.

Earthquakes can cause death, injury and significant damage to infrastructure.

Strong earthquakes can occur anywhere in Indonesia. They are less common in Kalimantan and south-west Sulawesi.

To stay safe during an earthquake:

  • know the emergency plans at your accommodation
  • take precautions to avoid exposure to debris and hazardous materials, including asbestos
  • MAGMA Indonesia  (Bahasa Indonesia)
  • Indonesia's Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency  (Bahasa Indonesia) or BMKG Multi-Hazard Early Warning System app (English and Indonesia)
  • Indonesia's Centre for Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation  (Bahasa Indonesia)
  • US Federal Emergency Management Agency advice on what to do before, during and after an earthquake  (English)

Forest fires and smoke haze

During the dry season in April to November, widespread forest fires can cause smoke haze resulting in poor air quality across parts of Indonesia, particularly the Riau Islands, central Sumatra and Kalimantan.

Smoke haze could affect your health and travel plans.

Keep up to date with local information and seek medical advice on appropriate precautions.

  • ASEAN Regional Haze Situation
  • Smartraveller advice on Bushfires

Tsunamis and high wave events

The Indian and Pacific Oceans experience more frequent, large and destructive tsunamis than other parts of the world.

There are many large earthquakes along major tectonic plate boundaries and ocean trenches.

High wave events can happen throughout coastal regions and between islands. They're caused by strong weather conditions and storms.

If you plan to surf, undertake water activities or travel by sea, check local conditions regularly.

If there’s a tsunami or high wave event: 

  • don't travel by sea if it's not safe to do so
  • Indonesia Tsunami Early Warning Centre  issues warnings when a potential tsunami with significant impact is expected
  • Indonesia's Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency  with the latest list of earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 5.0 on the Richter scale (Bahasa Indonesia) or  BMKG Multi-Hazard Early Warning System app  (English and Bahasa Indonesia)
  • US Federal Emergency Management Agency page  on what to do before, during and after an earthquake

Piracy occurs in the coastal areas of Indonesia.

The  International Maritime Bureau (IMB)  issues weekly piracy reports.

If you decide to travel by boat in these regions:

  • check  IMB piracy  reports
  • get local advice
  • arrange security measures
  • Travelling by boat
  • Going on a cruise
  • International Maritime Bureau

Travel insurance

Get comprehensive travel insurance before you leave. 

Your policy needs to cover all overseas medical costs, including emergency treatment and medical evacuation. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs.

If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. This applies to everyone, no matter how healthy and fit you are.

If you're not insured, you may have to pay many thousands of dollars up-front for medical care.

Before you travel, confirm:

  • what activities and care your policy covers
  • that your insurance covers you for the whole time you'll be away, including on all forms of transport you plan to take
  • whether it covers medical evacuation in the event of hospitalisation or injury
  • any exclusions to your policy

Physical and mental health

Consider your physical and mental health before you travel, especially if you have an existing medical condition. 

See your doctor or travel clinic to:

  • have a basic health check-up
  • ask if your travel plans may affect your health
  • plan any vaccinations you need

Do this at least 8 weeks before you leave.

If you have immediate concerns for your welfare or the welfare of another Australian, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your  nearest Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate  to discuss counselling hotlines and services available in your location.

  • General health advice
  • Healthy holiday tips  (Healthdirect Australia)

Not all medication available over the counter or by prescription in Australia is available in other countries. Some may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor.

Some drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are illegal in Indonesia.

If you plan to bring over-the-counter or prescription medication, check if it's legal in Indonesia by contacting the  Indonesian Embassy in Canberra  well in advance of your planned travel. Take enough legal medicine for your trip and carry it in its original packaging. Purchasing prescription medication online in Indonesia without an Indonesian prescription is illegal. Ensure you provide a valid prescription from an Indonesian doctor before purchasing prescription medication and confirm that it's accepted by the seller prior to your purchase.

Carry a copy of your prescription and a letter from your doctor stating:

  • what the medicine is
  • your required dosage
  • that it's for medical treatment or use

If you're caught with illegal medicine, you could face detention, fines or harsher penalties. You could face charges even if an Australian doctor prescribed the medication.

Ask the Indonesian Embassy in Canberra for advice before you travel.

Medicinal cannabis and cannabis-based products

Cannabis-based products such as cannabis oil and creams, hemp, CBD, THC, hash and edibles remain illegal in Indonesia, including for medicinal purposes. A medical prescription does not make it legal. If you take such products to Indonesia or purchase or use them in Indonesia, you can be arrested and face imprisonment, fines, deportation or the death penalty.

  • Medications

Health Risks

Critical care for Australians who become seriously ill, including in Bali, is significantly below the standard available in Australia. Medical evacuation may not be possible.

The Australian Government cannot guarantee your access to hospitals and other health services in Indonesia. 

Medical evacuation to Australia for medical conditions, is possible but is very expensive and may not be covered by travel insurance. Check your policy before you travel.

Ban on sale of liquid/syrup medication

The Indonesian Ministry of Health (MoH) has advised local health workers and pharmacists to stop selling liquid/syrup medication, including commonly used medications containing paracetamol and cough syrups. MoH and the Indonesian Paediatrician Association (IDAI) received reports of a sharp increase in cases of Atypical Progressive Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) in children , especially under the age of 5 years.

Insect-borne illnesses

Insect-borne illnesses are common throughout the year.

To protect yourself from disease:

  • research your destination
  • ask locals for advice
  • make sure your accommodation is mosquito-proof
  • use insect repellent
  • wear long, loose, light-coloured clothing

Dengue  occurs throughout Indonesia, including Bali, Jakarta and other major cities.

Dengue is common during the rainy season.

Australian health authorities have reported an increase in dengue infections in people returning from Bali in recent years.

Consult your travel doctor for further information on available vaccines and their suitability for your individual circumstances.

Zika virus  can occur in Indonesia.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites.

The  Australian Department of Health and Aged Care  advises pregnant women to:

  • discuss any travel plans with their doctor
  • consider deferring non-essential travel to affected areas

Malaria , including chloroquine-resistant strains, is widespread in rural areas, particularly in the provinces of Papua, Papua Pegunungan, Papua Tengah, Papua Selatan, Papua Barat Daya, Papua Barat, Maluku and Nusa Tenggara Timur. There is no malaria transmission in Jakarta.

  • Consider taking medicine to prevent malaria.

Japanese encephalitis and filariasis

Japanese encephalitis  and  filariasis  occur in Indonesia, especially in rural agricultural areas.

Japanese encephalitis has been present in Australian travellers returning from Indonesia, including Bali.

Vaccination is recommended for certain groups of travellers. 

  • Infectious diseases

Drink poisoning

People have been poisoned by alcoholic drinks contaminated with harmful substances, including methanol and arak (a traditional rice-based spirit). Locals and foreigners, including Australians, have died or become seriously ill from poisoned drinks.

Cases of drink poisoning have been reported in Bali and Lombok.

Contaminated drinks have included:

  • local spirits
  • spirit-based drinks, such as cocktails
  • brand name alcohol

To protect yourself from drink poisoning:

  • consider the risks when drinking alcoholic beverages
  • be careful drinking cocktails and drinks made with spirits
  • drink only at reputable licensed premises
  • avoid home-made alcoholic drinks

Labels on bottles aren't always accurate.

Symptoms of methanol poisoning can be similar to drinking too much. However, they are usually stronger.

Symptoms of methanol poisoning include:

  • vision problems

Vision problems may include:

  • blindness, blurred or snowfield vision
  • changes in colour perception
  • difficulty looking at bright lights
  • dilated pupils
  • flashes of light
  • tunnel vision

If you suspect that you or someone you're travelling with may have been poisoned, act quickly. Urgent medical attention could save your life or save you from permanent disability.

Report suspected cases of methanol poisoning to the Indonesian police.

Magic mushrooms

Don't consume magic mushrooms. They're illegal.

Australians have become sick or injured after taking magic mushrooms.

Australians have been in trouble with local police after taking magic mushrooms, particularly in Bali.

Magic mushrooms can cause major health problems, including:

  • erratic behaviour
  • severe hallucinations

Rabies is a risk throughout Indonesia, especially in:

  • Nusa Tenggara Timur, including Labuan Bajo
  • South Sulawesi
  • West Kalimantan
  • Nias, off the west coast of Sumatra

To protect yourself from rabies:

  • avoid direct contact with dogs
  • don't feed or pat animals
  • avoid contact with other animals, including bats and monkeys.

Talk to your doctor about getting a pre-exposure rabies vaccination. 

If bitten or scratched by an animal:

  • immediately use soap and water to wash the wound thoroughly for 15 minutes
  • seek urgent medical attention.

Rabies treatment in Indonesia may be limited, including the rabies vaccine and immunoglobulin availability. If you're bitten, you may need to return to Australia or travel to another country for immediate treatment.

You're at risk of contracting rabies if you visit a market where live animals and fresh food are sold because:

  • live rabies-positive dogs may be present
  • rabies-positive dog meat may be sold as food

Selling dog meat for human consumption is a breach of government disease control regulations.

Avoid contact with monkeys, even in places where you're encouraged to interact with them. This includes:

  • popular markets
  • tourist destinations
  • sanctuaries

Legionnaires' disease

Cases of Legionnaires' disease have been reported in people who have travelled to Bali. Travellers who are unwell with flu-like symptoms within 10 days of returning from Bali are advised to consult their GPs.

  • Legionnaires' disease warning for Bali travellers  (Western Australian Government Department of Health) 
  • Legionnaires’ disease  (Better Health Channel, Victorian Government Department of Health)
  • Legionnaires' disease  (World Health Organization)

Cases of poliovirus (type 1) have been reported in the provinces of Papua, Papua Pegunungan, Papua Tengah and Papua Selatan. Poliovirus (type 2) cases have been reported in the provinces of Aceh, East, West and Central Java. There may be unreported cases in other provinces in Indonesia.

Ensure that you're vaccinated against polio.

  • Factsheet on poliovirus types  (World Health Organization)
  • Health emergencies information for Indonesia  (World Health Organization)

Periodic outbreaks of measles continue to be reported in Indonesia, including Bali.

You need 2 doses of vaccine 4 weeks apart to be fully vaccinated against measles.

If you have symptoms of measles, seek medical attention.

Measles is highly infectious. Call before attending a healthcare facility.

Nipah Virus and Yellow Fever

There are no cases of  Nipah virus  or  Yellow Fever  in Indonesia. You may be temperature checked on arrival at international and domestic airports. If you have fever symptoms, you may be referred to the airport clinic for further tests and asked to seek medical treatment. See your doctor or travel clinic before you travel to plan any vaccinations you need.

HIV/AIDS is a risk for travellers. Take steps to reduce your risk of exposure to the virus.

Other health risks

Waterborne, foodborne, parasitic and other infectious diseases are widespread. These include:

  • tuberculosis

Serious outbreaks sometimes occur.

To protect yourself from illness:

  • boil drinking water or drink bottled water
  • avoid ice cubes
  • avoid raw food, such as salads

To minimise the risk of food poisoning, only eat meat from reputable suppliers.

Seek urgent medical attention if you suspect food poisoning or have a fever or diarrhoea.

Seafood toxins

You can become sick from naturally occurring seafood toxins, including:

  • ciguatera fish poisoning
  • scombroid (histamine fish poisoning)
  • toxins in shellfish

Avoid temporary black henna tattoos. The dye often causes serious skin reactions.

Before you get any tattoo, check the hygiene and safety of your tattoo provider.

Medical care

Medical facilities.

The standard of medical facilities in Indonesia is generally lower than Australia. Many regional hospitals only provide basic facilities.

Hospitals expect families to provide support to patients, including all financial support.

Psychiatric and psychological services are limited in Indonesia. Hospital staff may use physical restraints on patients.

When diving in Indonesia, there is a risk that you may experience decompression illness. An illness may occur when a diver ascends to the water surface too quickly and may have severe consequences. Understand the risks before you dive. 

Decompression chambers are available in various areas, including the following locations:

  • Bali's Sanglah General Hospital
  • Siloam Hospital in Labuan Bajo
  • Hospitals in Jakarta, Balikpapan, Bintan, Medan, Makassar, Raja Ampat (Waisai), Maluku, Tual and Manado near popular dive sites 

Before admitting patients, hospitals usually need:

  • guarantee of payment from the patient or their next of kin (family or friend)
  • confirmation of medical insurance
  • deposit payment 

There's no reciprocal healthcare agreement between Australia and Indonesia. 

The Australian Government cannot provide guarantee of payment, confirmation of medical insurance or a deposit payment for services.

If you become seriously ill or injured, you may need to be evacuated to a place with better care. Medical evacuation can be very expensive. Check your insurance policy before you travel. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs. It's best to check with your travel provider on the location and functionality of decompression chambers and other medical facilities available in the area before undertaking remote travel.

You're subject to all local laws and penalties, including those that may appear harsh by Australian standards. Research local laws before travelling.

Indonesian Parliament has passed revisions to its criminal code, which includes penalties for cohabitation and sex outside of marriage. These revisions will not come into force until January 2026.

Indonesia has signed into law revisions to the Electronic and Information Transactions Law (ITE Law). Tough penalties apply for defamation, hate speech, spreading hoaxes and uploading immoral content to the Internet. The law applies both within and outside Indonesia.

If you're arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you under our Consular Services Charter . But we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail.

  • Arrested or jailed

Penalties for drug offences are severe. They include the death penalty.

You may face heavy fines or jail for consuming or possessing even small amounts of drugs, including marijuana. Cannabis-based products such as cannabis oil and cream, hemp, CBD, THC, hash and edibles remain illegal in Indonesia, including for medicinal purposes. A medical prescription does not make it legal. If you take such products to Indonesia or purchase or use them in Indonesia, you can be arrested and face imprisonment, fines, deportation or the death penalty.

Some prescription medications that are available in Australia are illegal in Indonesia. Purchasing prescription medication online or over the counter in Indonesia without an Indonesian prescription is illegal. Ensure you provide a valid prescription from an Indonesian doctor before purchasing prescription medication and confirm that it's accepted by the seller before your purchase.

Magic mushrooms are illegal. Indonesian police work to prevent their distribution.

Police target illegal drug use and possession across Indonesia. Police often target popular places and venues in Bali, Lombok and Jakarta.

  • Carrying or using drugs

Local labour laws can change at short notice. This can affect expatriate workers.

Under Indonesian law, you must always carry identification. For example, your:

  • Australian passport; and
  • Resident's Stay Permit (if applicable)

Gambling is illegal.

Property laws are strict, seek legal advice before acquiring property in Indonesia.

It's sometimes illegal to take photographs in Indonesia. Obey signs banning photography. If in doubt, get advice from local officials. See Safety .

Australian laws

Some Australian criminal laws still apply when you're overseas. If you break these laws, you may face prosecution in Australia.

  • Staying within the law and respecting customs

Local customs

Standards of dress and behaviour are conservative in many parts of Indonesia. Take care not to offend.

Find out what customs apply at your destination.

If in doubt, seek local advice.

LGBTQIA+ information

Same-sex relationships are legal in Indonesia, except in the province of Aceh. Same-sex relationships in Aceh may attract corporal punishment. Visible displays of same sex relationships could draw unwanted attention.

Some laws and regulations can be applied in a way that discriminates against the LGBTI community, including for pornography and prostitution.

  • Advice for LGBTI travellers

The Islamic holiday month of Ramadan  is observed in Indonesia. Respect religious and cultural customs and laws at this time.

During Ramadan, eating, drinking and smoking may be illegal in public during this time. If you're not fasting, avoid these activities around people who are. Seek local advice to avoid offence and follow the advice of local authorities.

Explore our Ramadan page to learn more, including dates for Ramadan.

Aceh is governed as a special territory, not a province, and has a degree of special autonomy.

Some aspects of sharia law are upheld. This includes regulations and punishments that don't apply in other parts of Indonesia.

Local sharia police enforce sharia law.

Sharia law applies to anyone in Aceh, including:

  • foreigners (expats and travellers)
  • non-Muslims

Sharia law doesn't allow:

  • drinking alcohol
  • prostitution
  • same-sex relationships
  • extra-marital sex
  • co-habitation before marriage

It also requires a conservative standard of dress.

Learn about the laws in Aceh. If in doubt, seek local advice.

Dual citizenship

Indonesia doesn't allow dual nationality for adults, and you may be prosecuted by Immigration authorities should you be found to hold valid passports of two nationalities. If you entered Indonesia on your non-Australian citizenship passport, Indonesian Immigration will require you to exit Indonesia on that nationality's passport.

A child of Indonesian and Australian parents can maintain citizenship of both countries until the age of 18 years. Before a dual Australian-Indonesian citizen minor travels from Indonesia, additional identity documentation may be required from Indonesian Immigration. Check with Indonesian Immigration or the  Indonesian Embassy in Canberra  well in advance of your planned travel.

  • Embassy and Consulate of Indonesia
  • Information on limited dual citizenship
  • Dual nationals

Visas and border measures

Every country or territory decides who can enter or leave through its borders. For specific information about the evidence you'll need to enter a foreign destination, check with the nearest embassy, consulate or immigration department of the destination you're entering. 

Bali Tourism Levy

The Bali Provincial Government has introduced a new tourist levy of IDR 150,000 per person to foreign tourists entering Bali. The tourist levy is separate from the e-Visa on Arrival or the Visa on Arrival. Cashless payments can be made online prior to travel or on arrival at designated payment counters at Bali's airport and seaport. Exemption from payment of the levy applies to transit passengers and certain visa holders. See the Bali Provincial Government's  official website and FAQs for further information.

e-Visa on Arrival and Visa on Arrival

You can  apply for an e-Visa on Arrival (e-VOA)  no later than 48 hours prior to travelling to Indonesia if you are travelling for tourism, business meetings, purchasing goods or transiting only. Check the e-VOA requirements from Indonesian Immigration before applying.

You can still apply for a regular Visa on Arrival (VOA) at certain international airports, seaports and land crossings, including Jakarta, Bali, Surabaya, Makassar, Lombok, Batam, Medan, Manado, Aceh, Padang, Tanjung Pinang and Yogyakarta, if you do not apply for an e-VOA at least 48 hours in advance of your travel to Indonesia.

The e-VOA or VOA can be used for tourism, official government duties, business meetings, or to transit through Indonesia. You cannot transit in Indonesia without an e-VOA or VOA.

Additional requirements apply if you are travelling on government duties.

For the latest list of entry points for the e-VOA or VOA, refer to the  Directorate General of Immigration's list of land border crossings, international airports, and international seaports .

The e-VOA and VOA cost IDR 500,000 (approximately $A 50), with the e-VOA charging a small online processing fee.

For the VOA, some airports, including Jakarta's international airport, are only accepting cash payment. Card payment facilities are available at Bali's international airport. ATM facilities may be in high demand. Be prepared to pay in cash if required. 

The visa is valid for a 30 day stay and can be extended once (for a maximum of 30 days) by applying at an immigration office within Indonesia. Ensure you extend your visa within the initial 30 days to avoid an overstay fine and deportation.

To apply for a regular VOA, you must show:

  • your ordinary (non-emergency) passport with at least 6 months of validity from the date you plan to enter (we also recommend having at least 6 months passport validity from the date you plan to leave Indonesia, to avoid any issues for your departure or onward travel) 
  • a return flight booking to Australia or onward flight booking to another country

Contact your travel agent, airline, or your nearest  Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia  for details.

Other visas

If you're entering Indonesia from a port or airport that does not issue a visa on arrival, or you're visiting Indonesia for a purpose not allowed under the e-VOA or VOA conditions, you must apply for a visa in advance of travel. Check the  Indonesian Immigration  website for further information, or contact your nearest  Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia .

Overstaying your permit may result in fines, detention and/or deportation.

  • check your visa and permit, and contact the Directorate General of Immigration (DGI) for advice specific to your needs
  • if you use an agent to extend your visa or stay permit, use only reputable companies
  • if you have specific enquiries on visas or stay permits, contact DGI's Customer Service team via WhatsApp on +62 821 1295 3298

Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact the nearest Embassy or Consulate for details about visas, currency, customs and entry rules.

You can't work or conduct research in Indonesia unless you have the appropriate visa. Fines of IDR1,000,000 (approx. $A 100) per day apply for the maximum 60 day overstay period.

If you breach Indonesian immigration regulations, you may face:

  • deportation
  • re-entry bans

You may not be allowed to enter Indonesia if you have a criminal record. This is regardless of how long ago the offence took place. If you're concerned, contact an Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia before you travel.

Indonesian Immigration and visa decisions are final. The Australian Government can't help you.

  • Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia

Border measures

You'll be required to complete an  e-customs declaration for arrival . You can complete this within 3 days of departure to Indonesia.

Check entry requirements with your travel provider or the nearest  Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia  before you travel.

You may be temperature checked on arrival at international and domestic airports. If you have fever symptoms, you may be referred to the airport clinic for further tests and asked to seek medical treatment. See your doctor or travel clinic before you travel to plan any vaccinations you need.

Other formalities

If you're staying in a private residence, not a hotel, register when you arrive with both:

  • the local Rukun Tetangga Office
  • local police

If you plan to be in Indonesia for more than 30 days:

  • register with the local immigration office
  • make sure you have the right visa
  • Embassy of Indonesia in Canberra

Indonesia won't let you enter unless your passport is valid for 6 months after you plan to leave Indonesia. This can apply even if you're just transiting or stopping over. You can end up stranded or returned back to your previous port overseas at your own cost, if your passport is not valid for more than 6 months from the date you enter and the date you plan to leave Indonesia.

Indonesia does not accept entry with an emergency passport, even if it is valid for more than 6 months. Ensure you enter Indonesia on a valid ordinary, official, or diplomatic passport.

Some foreign governments and airlines apply these rules inconsistently. Travellers can receive conflicting advice from different sources.

The Australian Government does not set these rules. Check your passport's expiry date before you travel. If you're not sure it'll be valid for long enough, consider getting a new passport .

Lost or stolen passport

Your passport is a valuable document. It's attractive to people who may try to use your identity to commit crimes.

Some people may try to trick you into giving them your passport. Always keep it in a safe place.

If your passport is lost or stolen, tell the Australian Government as soon as possible:

  • In Australia, contact the Australian Passport Information Service .
  • If you're overseas, contact the nearest Australian Embassy, Consulate or High Commission.

Damaged Passports

Indonesian authorities have strict standards for damaged passports, and travellers have been refused entry into Indonesia with a damaged passport. Normal wear and tear, including water damage, minor tears or rips to the pages, can be considered damaged. 

It's important that:

  • there are no tears or cuts in the passport pages, especially the photo page
  • everything on the photo page is legible and clear
  • there are no marks across your photo or in the Machine Readable Zone (MRZ) on the photo page
  • no pages have been removed
  • there is no alteration or tampering

If you're not sure about the condition of your passport, call the Australian Passport Office on 131 232 or contact your nearest  Australian embassy or consulate overseas . We may need to see your passport to assess it.

  • Passport Services  
  • Damaged and faulty passports  
  • Using and protecting your passport  

Passport with ‘X’ gender identifier

Although Australian passports comply with international standards for sex and gender, we can’t guarantee that a passport showing 'X' in the sex field will be accepted for entry or transit by another country. Contact the nearest embassy, high commission or consulate of your destination  before you arrive at the border to confirm if authorities will accept passports with 'X' gender markers.

More information: 

  • LGBTQIA+ travellers

The local currency is the Indonesian Rupiah (IDR).

Declare cash in excess of IDR100,000,000 or equivalent when you arrive and leave. This covers all forms of currency, not only cash.

IDR100,000,000 is worth about $A10,000.

Local travel

Travel permits.

You may need a travel permit or Surat Keterangan Jalan to travel to some areas of the Papua provinces.

Check if you need a permit with the nearest  Embassy or Consulate of Indonesia  or with your travel provider.

Mobile Phone Reception and Wi-Fi

Mobile phone reception and Wi-Fi are not always available, including in remote areas and some resort islands. 

If you plan to stay in Indonesia for more than 90 days and would like to use your mobile phone purchased overseas, you'll need to register your mobile phone IMEI number with  Indonesian Customs  within the first 60 days of your stay. 

If you plan to stay in Indonesia for less than 90 days, you can visit the local cellular operator/provider booth at the airport to get an access period to use the Indonesian cellular network, which is only valid for 90 days and includes data roaming.

A customs payment may be required, or a tourist SIM card can be purchased for short-term stays. You can use Wi-Fi networks without registration.

To stay in communication and avoid mobile service interruptions: 

  • check mobile coverage with your service provider
  • register your mobile device with  Indonesian Customs  on arrival if you plan to connect to the mobile network 

Driving permit

To drive in Indonesia, you need either:

  • an Indonesian licence
  • an International Driving Permit (IDP)

Check that your licence or permit is appropriate for the type of vehicle you're driving.

Your Australian licence isn't enough.

Your travel insurer will deny any claims you make if:

  • you're unlicensed
  • you don't hold the correct class of licence

Road travel

Traffic can be extremely congested.

Road users are often unpredictable or undisciplined.

You're more likely to be killed in a motor vehicle accident in Indonesia than in Australia. Drive defensively. Some traffic incidents can escalate into violent disputes quickly.

Consider hiring a taxi or a driver who is familiar with local roads and traffic conditions.

  • Driving or riding

Motorcycles

Motorcycle accidents have killed and injured foreigners, including Australians. This includes in tourist areas, particularly Bali, Lombok and the Gili Islands.

If you're riding a motorbike and there's an accident, you'll often be assumed to be at fault. You may be expected to compensate all parties.

If you hire a motorbike:

  • make sure your insurance policy covers you
  • check if any policy restrictions apply, for example if you're not licensed to ride a motorcycle in Australia

Always wear a helmet.

Public transport

Buses, trains and the metro rail can be crowded, particularly:

  • around public holidays
  • during peak commute times

Safety standards may not be observed.

  • Transport and getting around safely

Only use licensed official metered taxis. 

  • only travel in licensed taxis with signage, a "taxi" roof sign and meters
  • book via phone or an official taxi company mobile app

You can book licensed official metered taxis

  • on the taxi company's official mobile app
  • from inside airports
  • at stands at major hotels

Unofficial operators can have taxis that look similar to those run by reputable companies. Make sure the taxi meter is working before you get into the taxi. 

See  Safety .

Rail travel

Inter-city rail networks operate on the islands of Java, Sumatra and Sulawesi.

Commuter trains operate in Java, including Jakarta.

Trains can be crowded, particularly:

  • during peak commuter times

Travel between islands

Travel by ferry or boat can be dangerous.

Passenger and luggage limits aren't always observed.

Equipment may not be properly maintained, and they may not have GPS or emergency communications equipment.

There may not be enough life jackets. It's unlikely that the crew will have life jackets for children.

In March 2024, a ferry sank in the Thousand Islands off the coast of Jakarta, resulting in one death, and a liveaboard boat caught fire and sank in Raja Ampat, Papua Barat Daya, requiring several passengers to be rescued.

In August 2023, two crew died after a boat carrying passengers sank in the Banyak Islands, Aceh, and three people went missing after a ship sank in the Thousand Islands off the coast of Jakarta.

In July 2023, 15 people died after a ferry sank off Sulawesi Island.

In January 2023, 23 passengers and 6 crew were rescued after an inter-island ferry sank while returning from Nusa Penida to Sanur Beach, Bali.

In May 2022, 19 people died after a ferry sank in the Makassar Strait.

In June 2018, a ferry sank on Lake Toba in Sumatra and 100s of people died.

If you plan to travel by sea between islands:

  • make sure any ferry or boat you board has appropriate safety equipment, GPS and communication equipment, and life jackets
  • wear a life jacket at all times
  • take enough life jackets for all children travelling with you
  • ask your tour operator or crew about safety standards before you travel
  • check sea, weather conditions and forecasts before embarking on boat or ferry travel, and delay travel if conditions are not safe

If appropriate safety equipment isn't available, use another provider.

Avoid travelling by water after dark unless the vessel is properly equipped. Avoid travel during wet weather or storms.

DFAT doesn't provide information on the safety of individual commercial airlines or flight paths.

Check Indonesia's air safety profile with the Aviation Safety Network.

The European Union (EU) has published a list of airlines that have operating bans or restrictions within the EU. See the  EU list of banned airlines .

Australian travellers should make their own decisions on which airlines to travel with.

Emergencies

Depending on what you need, contact your:

  • family and friends
  • travel agent
  • insurance provider

Search and rescue services

Medical emergencies and ambulance.

SMS 1717 for Jakarta Police

Police Stations in Bali

Refer to the Bali Tourism Board’s list of  police stations in Bali

Always get a police report when you report a crime.

Your insurer should have a 24-hour emergency number.

Consular contacts

Read the Consular Services Charter for what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.

Australian Embassy, Jakarta 

Jalan Patra Kuningan Raya Kav. 1-4 Jakarta Selatan 12950

Phone: (+62 21) 2550 5555 Email: [email protected] Website: indonesia.embassy.gov.au Facebook: Australian Embassy Jakarta, Indonesia X: @DubesAustralia Instagram: @KeDubesAustralia

Make an appointment online or call (+62 21) 2550 5500 or (+62 21) 2550 5555.

Australian Consulate-General, Bali

Jalan Tantular 32 Renon Denpasar Bali 80234

Phone: (+62 361) 2000 100 Email: [email protected] Website: bali.indonesia.embassy.gov.au X: @KonJenBali Instagram:  @konjenbali

Australian Consulate-General, Makassar

Wisma Kalla Lt. 7 Jalan Dr Sam Ratulangi No. 8 Makassar South Sulawesi 90125

Phone: (+62 411) 366 4100 Email: [email protected] Website: makassar.consulate.gov.au Facebook: Australian Consulate-General, Makassar, Sulawesi X: @KonJenMakassar Instagram:  @konjenmakassar

Australian Consulate-General, Surabaya

Level 3 ESA Sampoerna Center Jl. Dokter.Ir. H. Soekarno No. 198 Klampis Ngasem, Sukolilo, Surabaya

Phone: (+62 31) 9920 3200 Email: [email protected] Website: surabaya.consulate.gov.au Instagram: @KonJenSurabaya

Check the websites for details about opening hours and any temporary closures.

24-hour Consular Emergency Centre

In a consular emergency, if you can't contact an embassy, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on:

  • +61 2 6261 3305 from overseas
  • 1300 555 135 in Australia

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Home » News » DFAT to give Smartraveller a major facelift

DFAT to give Smartraveller a major facelift

dfat smart traveller fiji

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) has announced it will launch a new and improved Smartraveller website next month, which will include an improved system for receiving travel advice updates and a new approach to registration.

Smartraveller, which is operated by DFAT, is the Australian government’s travel advice and consular information service. The service maintains travel advisories for more than 170 destinations around the world and allows users to subscribe for free travel updates at any time.

Along with making travel advisories easier to read and navigate, travellers will soon be able to receive all travel advice updates simply by using their email address to subscribe.

DFAT will also offer a new option to receive SMS ‘critical alerts’ in a crisis.

“The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is committed to helping Australians in difficulty overseas, including those impacted by a crisis,” a spokesperson for the department told Travel Weekly.

Smartraveller’s registration service is also changing.

From November, registration will only be activated when there is an overseas crisis, which DFAT believes will allow it to respond more quickly to those who need help.

DFAT has also advised registration will be easier, through a simplified online form. This will appear on the Smartraveller website if there’s an overseas crisis.

Travellers will no longer need to register their travel with DFAT before leaving Australia, but for those travelling before November, they can still register their details.

Travellers can still call DFAT if they are need of urgent help on 1300 555 135 (in Australia) or on 02 6261 3305 (from overseas).

Current subscribers will need to resubscribe when DFAT launches its new Smartraveller website.

Email the Travel Weekly team at [email protected]

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dfat smart traveller fiji

Useful travel tips for Fiji travellers: transport edition

Travelling in a new country can be as thrilling as it is frustrating. The latter often leaves people feeling sour about their entire trip. For this article, we’ll share tips about transports in Fiji, tips that will help you navigate your way better, including knowing a few key rules or etiquettes about transports in Fiji.

dfat smart traveller fiji

The Suva bus stand.

Difference in number plates

A difference in number plates has various meanings in Fiji, from its colour, to the numbering and the certain letters on the plates. Registered vehicles have a two-letter printing, along with a three or four number printing after it. The difference lies in the plates colouring and certain letters used. A white number plate with black printing refers to privately owned vehicles and blue plates that begin with the letter G such as, ‘GP’, ‘GS’ or ‘GN’ refer to any registered government vehicles.

dfat smart traveller fiji

There are three types of yellow plates in Fiji. For registered taxis, their plates will have something like, ‘LT 3452’, ‘LT’ refers to licensed taxis. However, taxis in Nadi and Lautoka do not have LT on their number plates but ‘ND’ and ‘LTK’ on their blue number plates instead. This was a result of a zoning initiative that started back in April of 2019. Minibuses have ‘LM’ at the start of their plate for licensed minibus and rental vehicles will have ‘LR’ on their plates for licensed rental.

Available public transportations in Fiji

Fiji has three types of public transportation operating on its roads, these are buses, minibuses and taxis. Knowing the difference should at least provide you some comfort-buses are the cheapest form of travel while minibuses are the swiftest and taxis are expensive but yet comfortable. There aren’t any trams in Fiji and the nation’s only trains are reserved for the easy conveyance of canes to its various sugar mills located in the western towns of Viti Levu.

Buses operate only on the larger islands of Viti Levu, Vanua Levu and Taveuni. Village carrier trucks and private vehicles operate on islands that have roads, and taxis in all three of the above-mentioned islands, including Ovalau, home of Fiji’s old capital, Levuka.

Travelling in public transports

Minibuses but especially buses are preferred by locals and therefore will be crowded. With a narrow aisle and congested seating, it’s easy to feel out of place in such a vehicle but when you board and decide to get off at your destination, here’s what to do. Look toward the side of the window for either a button to push or a small string to pull- the string runs straight to the front where a small bell will be attached. Travelling in a minibus is likely the same but if there isn’t a button to push, you can simply knock twice on the side of the window, which will be in coach.

Fares A lot of transactions in Fiji are cash transactions with limited options for card use. However, local buses operate on an electronic card system and you can get electronic disposable cards at any Vodafone outlets near you. Fines are heavily imposed on those that use cash for bus services, including the bus drivers that encourage such activity.

dfat smart traveller fiji

A state/government vehicle. Driving Kind reminder for those getting a rental, motorists drive on the left-side of the road and roads in the rural outback can be quite rough, narrow and unkempt. Also take precaution when driving in rural areas, in the case of an unlikely breakdown you could be stranded for a while. Try and take a local driver with you if you can.

Fiji roads Roads in the city and urban areas are well-kept but roads in rural areas can be quite unduly for foreigners. Perhaps the biggest grievance will be potholes, a problem that Fiji can’t seem to get rid of. Street lights are also heavily concentrated in the urban areas, thus driving at night can be dangerous as livestock will be loose and many of Fiji’s coastal roads have sharp bends.

Any related land transport registration and queries are dealt with the Land Transport Authority (LTA).

dfat smart traveller fiji

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Heading overseas? You won’t need to do this anymore

From November, DFAT has announced that Smartraveller will launch an all-new website that will change how Australians register their overseas travel.

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade announce a change to it’s Smartraveller.

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Jetstar’s urgent plea to passengers

Qantas announces exciting new flight route

Qantas announces exciting new flight route

The Australian government has always recommended for Aussie travellers heading overseas on holiday to register their details. But gone are the days of having to log on and provide every little detail – Smartraveller has today announced a game changer of an update to their system.

The old process of having to log in and allocate time to filling out forms is no longer required. Instead, Aussies travelling overseas will soon just have to register their email address and phone number to receive all relevant travel information to their trip – but there’s one big change.

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Australians will now only need to register their email address.

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) has revealed that Smartraveller will open up registration for Australians only when there’s a crisis. Meaning, it will be quicker to respond and assist to those in need of help.

There will also be an SMS option for ‘critical alerts’ when required.

For example, if you find yourself stranded in a city where there’s violent riots or protests, the website will activate registration and you will be provided help and information from travel advisories from DFAT.

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Take note, if you’re already a current subscriber with Smartraveller, you’ll need to resubscribe when the new website is launched.

There’s no word on when exactly these changes will be implemented, but it’s said to take place in November.

Additionally, if you find yourself in need of urgent help you can call DFAT on 1300 555 135 (in Australia) or on +612 6261 3305 (from overseas).

For more details and information visit smartraveller.gov.au

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Qantas reveals fancy new in-flight menu

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General Travel Information

The dfat smart traveller website located at  www.smarttraveller.gov.au can give you valuable information when you’re travelling overseas..

It is recommended that you register your travel details prior to travelling. This information is treated with confidentiality and can make it easier for your friends and family to contact you overseas.

Organise your travel money:

Before you go:.

Find out what currency is used at your destination and check ATM availability.

Arrange a selection of methods for carrying your money overseas: Cash, traveller’s cheques, credit card, cash and travel money card.

Tell the bank the dates you are travelling.

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Smartraveller Warnings Explained

Smartraveller Travel Warnings Explained

The australian department of foreign affairs and trade (dfat) provides travel advices for more than 170 countries on their smartraveller website., did you know that the level of the smartraveller advice may affect the cover provided by your travel insurance policy.

The smartraveller website is a great resource for travellers.  The travel advisories identify risks you might encounter at your destination and provide useful information about local laws and travel, health, safety, natural disasters and entry/exit requirements.  The advisories also provide contact information for emergency services and the local embassy.

These travel advisories are updated from time to time, usually if something happens which affects Australians travelling in the area.  Although the advisories aren’t updated for every incident that occurs, it is a good idea to sign up to receive updates by email.  This will help keep you informed in addition to information you can obtain locally via the media etc.

What are the levels?

There are four smartraveller advisory levels:

Level 1 – Exercise normal safety precautions

Level 2 – Exercise a high degree of caution

Level 3 – Reconsider your need to travel

Level 4 – Do not travel

The level selected by DFAT for a destination is based on its assessment of risks posed to Australians travelling to and in the destination country.

Level 1 generally means that overall, DFAT assesses the destination as similar to being located in a large Australian city.  This usually means the destination has a functioning law and order system and stable government.  DFAT recommends travellers exercise common sense, be alert to suspicious behavior and monitor local media etc.  Essentially, just like you would do if you were in a large Australian city.

Level 2 is higher than Level 1 and means the risk to travellers is greater than what you would encounter in a large Australian city.  This may be due to deficiencies in public services (eg law enforcement), a high level of violent crime or security threats such as civil unrest or terrorism potential.  It could also be due to a short term issue such as a passing cyclone, natural disaster or local election.

Level 2 smartraveller warnings usually recommend you research specific threats and take extra precautions for your personal safety while at the destination.

Level 3 means there are serious threats and potentially life threatening risks at the destination which make it unsafe for tourist and non-essential travel.  Reasons for a Level 3 advisory could include terrorism and kidnapping threat, violent crime, ongoing civil rest or disease.

When an advisory is at Level 3, the Australian government is recommending you reconsider your need to travel to the destination.  You should consider whether you need to go – perhaps you can defer your travel or choose another destination.  If you are at the destination and the warning level is lifted to “Reconsider your need to travel”, it’s a good idea to see if you can leave.

Level 4 is the highest warning level and in this case, the Australian government is advising travellers not to travel to the destination.  This means the destination is extremely dangerous.  According to DFAT, reasons for this warning level include ”a high threat of terrorist attack, ongoing armed conflict, violent social unrest or critical levels of violent crime”.   It could also be that more than one of these factors is at play.  If you are in a country and the warning level is lifted to “Do not travel”, consider leaving immediately if safe to do so.

Bear in mind too that sometimes the advisory for a country overall may be Level 1 or 2 but specific areas or regions within the country may be at Level 3 or 4.

What about travel insurance?

Most travel insurance policies carry an exclusion that says the insurer wont be liable for any claim that arises from you exposing yourself to needless danger.  More specifically though, many policies have an exclusion that says the insurer wont pay any claim which results from you travelling to an area or country that the Australian Government recommends you don’t visit.  Some policies specifically state that no claim will be payable if you travel to a country where the smartraveller warning level is Level 4 – Do not travel.  Others are more general in that they don’t specify the warning level but just reference travelling to countries where the Australian government recommends against travel.  In this case, the policy may not respond if you travel to a country where the smartraveller advisory level is Level 3 – Reconsider your need to travel or Level 4 – Do not travel.

If you are looking to cancel a pre-booked trip because the travel advisory level has been raised, this will usually need to have occurred after the trip and policy were purchased and remain in force within a set period prior to your planned travel to the destination.  If you purchase a policy to cover you for travel to a destination and the advisory at that time is Level 3 – Reconsider your need to travel and it is raised to Level 4 – Do not travel, it is unlikely the insurer will pay the claim.  This is because the government was already recommending you reconsider your need to travel at the time you booked your trip and/or purchased the policy.  For a claim to be payable in this circumstance, the warning level at the time of booking the trip and/or purchasing the policy would need to be Level 1 or Level 2.

Also, the warning advising against travel must remain in force at the time you were pre-booked to travel.  That is, the warning must apply at the time you were planning to be at the destination.  A warning level increase advising against travel many months in advance of your scheduled travel to the destination may not entitle you to make a claim.  This is because the reason for the warning against travel may resolve prior to your scheduled travel date.  The reason for the warning must still be valid at the time you plan to travel to the destination to entitle you to cancel the trip and make a claim against the policy.

As the Australian government slogan says – “be a smart traveller”.  Keep up to date with the advisory level for your chosen destination and check with your travel provider to make sure you understand how the government advice level may affect your travel plans and entitlement to claim.

Got questions?  Why not call us on  1300 819 888  or send an email to  [email protected]

dfat smart traveller fiji

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Australian high commission, fiji, head of mission.

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37 Princes Rd (Tamavua) Suva Fiji

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Australian High Commission in Fiji website

IMAGES

  1. DFAT Launch TravelWise Smartphone App

    dfat smart traveller fiji

  2. 다운로드 Smart Traveller 모두 무료

    dfat smart traveller fiji

  3. JWT to lead Department of Foreign Affairs' Smartraveller rebrand

    dfat smart traveller fiji

  4. Stay safe in emergencies abroad: how to register with DFAT's

    dfat smart traveller fiji

  5. DFAT Smart Traveller

    dfat smart traveller fiji

  6. Smart Traveller warnings and travel insurance: How changes in DFAT

    dfat smart traveller fiji

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COMMENTS

  1. Fiji Travel Advice & Safety

    Safety. Crime in Fiji includes robbery, theft, violent assault, sexual assault and home invasions. Most crime is opportunistic. The highest risk is in urban areas and at night. Be careful in downtown Suva after dark. Credit card fraud and ATM card skimming occur. Protect your PIN and be alert when using ATMs. Regularly check your card and bank ...

  2. Fiji

    Development assistance in Fiji ; Travel information. Before you travel, visit smartraveller.gov.au. Read the travel advice for Fiji; Subscribe to updates; ... Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. R.G. Casey Building John McEwen Crescent Barton ACT 0221 Australia. Phone: +61 2 6261 1111 Fax: +61 2 6261 3111 ABN: 47 065 634 525. Contact us.

  3. Homepage

    The Consular Services Charter outlines the consular services and assistance provided by the Australian Government to travellers overseas. Read the Charter to understand how we can and can't help. View details. Download Consular Services Charter (PDF 195.79 KB)

  4. Destinations

    03 Jun 2024. Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa. Reconsider your need to travel. 03 Jun 2024. Peru. Americas. Exercise a high degree of caution. 03 Jun 2024.

  5. Travel Advice

    The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is committed to helping Australians in difficulty overseas, including those impacted by a crisis. The Smartraveller website was updated in November 2019 and now provides a simpler system for getting travel advice updates and a new approach to registration. As part of the update we no longer ask ...

  6. Travel advice explained

    Travel advice explained. Tuesday, 28/05/2024. When travelling overseas, it's your responsibility to take care of your safety and wellbeing. Our travel advice will help you understand the risks and what you can do to avoid or handle difficulties. This page explains: what each advice level means in travel advisories.

  7. Pacific Travel Advice & Safety

    The Australian Government provides 24-hour consular emergency assistance. +61 2 6261 3305 from overseas. 1300 555 135 from within Australia. For how we can help you overseas see the Consular Services Charter.

  8. Fiji

    If you're travelling to Fiji, our up-to-date travel advice gives you practical tips on emergency contacts, security, climate and other essential information. ... Travel Advice on this webpage is no longer being updated. To ensure you receive the latest Travel Advice for Fiji, please see Ireland.ie.

  9. Bula! Fiji Travel Requirements

    When planning your trip to Fiji, it's essential to be aware of the travel requirements in place. This guide provides information on visas, COVID-19 guidelines, and the Care Fiji Commitment, ensuring you have a smooth and enjoyable experience during your visit. ... Travel Requirements for Fiji: Visas, COVID Guidelines, and Care Fiji Commitment.

  10. Indonesia Travel Advice & Safety

    Petty and violent crime occurs in Indonesia. Opportunistic crime, such as pickpocketing occurs. Drinks may be spiked or mixed with toxic substances. Crimes involving taxis and taxi drivers occur. Solo women are at higher risk. Be alert in taxis, public transport, crowds, bars and nightclubs.

  11. Smart Traveller Advise

    Save. The Australian Government via the Smart Traveller advise-line are sending out these warnings for Australian Citizens. Whilst each government will have their own one of these I think it is important enough to share: [email protected]. I think everyone should be aware that more and more countries are closing their borders.

  12. Stay safe in emergencies abroad: how to register with DFAT's

    If you prefer, you can avoid web registration entirely, and leave all the details in a voicemail on 1300 555 135 (option 3). Top tip: note down the location and telephone number of the nearest Australian Consulate, Embassy or High Commission to your destination. In an emergency, DFAT is a useful source of information.

  13. Travel

    If you're an Australian citizen and you have serious concerns about your welfare or that of another Australian overseas, contact your local Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate, or call our 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on. 1300 555 135 within Australia. +61 2 6261 3305 from anywhere in the world.

  14. Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)

    Travel Advisories: We re-evaluate the situation in each country every 6-12 months. Advisories include a simple 1-4 rating system, details about specific risks in the country, and clear steps U.S. citizens should take to stay safe. ... Become a Smart Traveler Now! STEP is an easy first step to being a smart traveler. You should also always ...

  15. DFAT to give Smartraveller a major facelift

    Travellers can still call DFAT if they are need of urgent help on 1300 555 135 (in Australia) or on 02 6261 3305 (from overseas). Current subscribers will need to resubscribe when DFAT launches ...

  16. Smart Traveller warnings and travel insurance: How changes in DFAT

    Smart Traveller warnings and travel insurance: How changes in DFAT advisory can affect you By Michael Gebicki Updated January 18, 2018 — 9.58am first published at 12.15am

  17. Travel Smart in Fiji: Essential Transport Tips for Every Traveler

    Get ready for your Fiji journey with expert transportation tips featured in our latest blog on GoFiji.net. Learn about navigating the islands, local transport options, and scenic routes. Make the most of your Fijian adventure by ensuring a seamless travel experience. Explore Fiji confidently with our transportation insights!

  18. Fiji Program Support Platform

    DFAT anticipates tendering for the Fiji Program Support Platform (the Platform) to replace the current Fiji Program Support Facility (The Facility) in early 2024.The Facility runs from 23 January 2017 to 31 December 2024, with a contract end date of 22 January 2025. It has implemented around 50% of Australia's Fiji bilateral development assistance.

  19. DFAT Smartraveller update 2019: Should you register your ...

    Additionally, if you find yourself in need of urgent help you can call DFAT on 1300 555 135 (in Australia) or on +612 6261 3305 (from overseas). For more details and information visit smartraveller.gov.au. The Australian government has always recommended for Aussie travellers heading overseas on holiday to register their details.

  20. General Travel Information

    The DFAT Smart Traveller Website located at www.smarttraveller.gov.au. can give you valuable information when you're travelling overseas. The site can provide you with useful information on local laws, entry and departure procedures, health information and up to date information on the security status of a particular country.

  21. Smartraveller Travel Warnings Explained

    There are four smartraveller advisory levels: Level 1 - Exercise normal safety precautions. Level 2 - Exercise a high degree of caution. Level 3 - Reconsider your need to travel. Level 4 - Do not travel. The level selected by DFAT for a destination is based on its assessment of risks posed to Australians travelling to and in the ...

  22. Australian High Commission, Fiji

    Travel advice. To help Australians avoid difficulties overseas, we maintain travel advisories for more than 170 destinations. ... Australian High Commission in Fiji website. Site map + Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. R.G. Casey Building John McEwen Crescent Barton ACT 0221 Australia. Phone: +61 2 6261 1111 Fax: +61 2 6261 3111 ABN: 47 ...